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Old 08-12-2014, 19:04   #706
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Re: The Yard Guys

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Where i can found that topic? just puting moody in the search tab?
I think this may be it: S/V Primrose grounds and sinks on ICW near Ponce
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Old 08-12-2014, 19:10   #707
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Re: The Yard Guys

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You mean that boat with a huge windage, a cage window and 28% of D/B ratio on an old keel with a low draft?
This one?





The one you say it has a lateral not watertight door and is not able to pass the Class A relatively small minimum demanded in what regards safety and seaworthiness?




That is easy to know. People do what they desire to do. If you see that most cruisers have boats with the ability to cross oceans and see only a small portion of them crossing the Atlantic it is because they don't want to. Or do you really think that crossing the Atlantic, besides being boring to most, is something special or dificult?

There will be very few that will enjoy 20 days at sea without seeing land or having a nice meal on a restaurant, a beer at the bar, or changing from time to time from one nice anchorage to another. Sure, it will be nice to know the Caribbean, but like most Americans do regarding the Med, it is a lot less boring and time consuming to charter a boat there. I don't know if I ever cross the Atlantic but you can be sure that if I cross it will not be for the pleasure of crossing it (boring stuff) but for the pleasure to sail on the Caribbean with my own boat. It is worth it? I did not decide yet, but for most it isn't.


If you think offshore passages are boring, that explains a lot.
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Old 08-12-2014, 19:23   #708
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Re: The Yard Guys

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If you think offshore passages are boring, that explains a lot.
Don't they say that sailing is hours/days of boredom broken up by occasional seconds or minutes of sheer fright and near death experiences?

BTW my twice circumnav friend says a passage is supposed be boring otherwise you did not prepare for it well. And he tells me in his 25 years of world cruising and many tens of thousands of miles only twice did he consider his life to be in danger. Once in a misforecast Pacific typhoon and another time on a delivery where he was misled by the owner as to something or other on the boat (I forget what).
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Old 08-12-2014, 19:28   #709
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Re: The Yard Guys

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Many insurance companies do just that in practice. If one is in the hurricane box, there is no coverage - unless at sea. Our present insurance has a higher deductible for a named storm - unless at sea.

Mark
Maybe it's because when a hurricane is approaching those who opt to head out to sea rather than heading for safe harbor are never heard from again??? Insurance cos. do rely on the amount of claims filed to set their premiums. They're pretty heartless that way.
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Old 08-12-2014, 19:30   #710
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Re: The Yard Guys

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Don't they say that sailing is hours/days of boredom broken up by occasional seconds or minutes of sheer fright and near death experiences?

BTW my twice circumnav friend says a passage is supposed be boring otherwise you did not prepare for it well.
My lifelong dream is to have a chance to be "bored" like that one day!
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Old 08-12-2014, 19:39   #711
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Re: The Yard Guys

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My lifelong dream is to have a chance to be "bored" like that one day!
It's all relative. On one of my two trips up from FL to New England we were in some unsettled weather. But the boat was set up in a way that it handled it beatifully and later on we heard of other boats which started about the same time having to duck into safe harbors for various reasons. They certainly were not bored but we were.

By set up I mean the guy took a fierce flat deck early 80s racer w/o even a dodger (Dubois 46) and built a hard top from scratch with all the lines leading to the now snug and dry cockpit so that we never even had to come out on deck to do anything for most of the passage. Now that was boring to be sure but quite safe. There is no reason these days to be masochistic about long passages if you set your boat up correctly.
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Old 08-12-2014, 19:55   #712
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Re: The Yard Guys

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It's all relative. On one of my two trips up from FL to New England we were in some unsettled weather. But the boat was set up in a way that it handled it beatifully and later on we heard of other boats which started about the same time having to duck into safe harbors for various reasons. They certainly were not bored but we were.

By set up I mean the guy took a fierce flat deck early 80s racer w/o even a dodger (Dubois 46) and built a hard top from scratch with all the lines leading to the now snug and dry cockpit so that we never even had to come out on deck to do anything for most of the passage. Now that was boring to be sure but quite safe. There is no reason these days to be masochistic about long passages if you set your boat up correctly.
Interesting story. I always appreciate hearing stories about long passages.

I never have to leave the cockpit to deal with my headsail & mainsail (incl. reefing) on my sloop rig, but I have a detachable inner forestay that I can fly a staysail or storm jib on which are strictly hank-on. I always set it up ahead of time when heading offshore, but it still requires a trip to the mast in less than idyllic conditions to raise the halyard, etc. It's the ol' trade-off b'twn dead-bang reliability vs. comfort & potential safety. I prefer the detachable stay over a typical twin-headsail cutter arrangement, but I know that roller furling is available for this application as well. More sea-time on my part will probably resolve it one way or the other for me.
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Old 08-12-2014, 20:20   #713
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Re: The Yard Guys

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Interesting story. I always appreciate hearing stories about long passages.

I never have to leave the cockpit to deal with my headsail & mainsail (incl. reefing) on my sloop rig, but I have a detachable inner forestay that I can fly a staysail or storm jib on which are strictly hank-on. I always set it up ahead of time when heading offshore, but it still requires a trip to the mast in less than idyllic conditions to raise the halyard, etc. It's the ol' trade-off b'twn dead-bang reliability vs. comfort & potential safety. I prefer the detachable stay over a typical twin-headsail cutter arrangement, but I know that roller furling is available for this application as well. More sea-time on my part will probably resolve it one way or the other for me.
I personally think that the time to solve long passage safety issues is not during the passage but way before, when still in port. Just as one would not start a trip in the Mojave desert in a convertible w/o a top so one should not go offshore in a less than an overall offshore-ready vessel (whatever it means). Not just obvious tankage and storage but issues of exposure to hazards while on deck, ease of handling sails, safety while in the cockpit, etc, etc. I'm always surpised to see people set off for a more than a daysail voyage without giving much thought to many of those issues.
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Old 08-12-2014, 21:01   #714
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Re: The Yard Guys

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Are Moodys still losing their rudders? I recall a spate of skeg failures on Moodys in the mid 1980s.... One bloke lost skeg, rudder, and boat between Capetown and Australia... made a lot of noise in yachting press... took Moody to court over it.... settled out of court so I assume he was given a large slab of cash to shut his gob and say no more about it.....
Woah! I had no idea about the other Moody's losing their rudders. I only came across that one instance in the ICW.

A spate of them? Sounds like Moodys are now in the same class as Hunters! Heh-heh.
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Old 08-12-2014, 21:05   #715
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Re: The Yard Guys

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There will be very few that will enjoy 20 days at sea without seeing land or having a nice meal on a restaurant, a beer at the bar, or changing from time to time from one nice anchorage to another. Sure, it will be nice to know the Caribbean, but like most Americans do regarding the Med, it is a lot less boring and time consuming to charter a boat there. I don't know if I ever cross the Atlantic but you can be sure that if I cross it will not be for the pleasure of crossing it (boring stuff) but for the pleasure to sail on the Caribbean with my own boat. It is worth it? I did not decide yet, but for most it isn't.
Bingo. That's exactly our plan at this point. Cruise the Carib with our own boat for a few years - then charter in the Med and other bikini-type places. That plan could always change, but I doubt it.

I don't mind longer off-shores, but I do like the destinations at the end of that journey more than the journey itself most of the time. Different strokes I suppose.
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Old 08-12-2014, 21:10   #716
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Re: The Yard Guys

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I personally think that the time to solve long passage safety issues is not during the passage but way before, when still in port. Just as one would not start a trip in the Mojave desert in a convertible w/o a top so one should not go offshore in a less than an overall offshore-ready vessel (whatever it means). Not just obvious tankage and storage but issues of exposure to hazards while on deck, ease of handling sails, safety while in the cockpit, etc, etc. I'm always surpised to see people set off for a more than a daysail voyage without giving much thought to many of those issues.
+1.

This is a great point.
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Old 08-12-2014, 21:27   #717
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Re: The Yard Guys

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Do a bit of digging and you will find that this particular Moody suffered severe skeg failure due to an extremely poor repair which failed when a tow boat dragged them off a bank in the usual idiotic fashion. They posted here, with pics, and I tried to help them out a bit. Just a bit more fact bending to match the agenda....
Fact bending to match an agenda?

Where exactly did you get the "idiotic tow-boat thing" causing the damage? Here is Mike's own account:

Quote:
Primrose went aground in the channel at day marker red 18 then while backing off hit her rudder. The result: skeg torn off leaving a hole in the boat. She took on water till her decks were awash. Crews with pumps and a diver stopped the water enough to tow her to a nearby boat yard.
The "idiotic towing" doesn't seem to happen until after she's on the bottom. Which means, she lost her skeg while backing off a relatively soft grounding.

So who's bending facts again?

I'm just interested in these other Moodys that have had failures.
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Old 08-12-2014, 21:29   #718
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Re: The Yard Guys

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I personally think that the time to solve long passage safety issues is not during the passage but way before, when still in port. Just as one would not start a trip in the Mojave desert in a convertible w/o a top so one should not go offshore in a less than an overall offshore-ready vessel (whatever it means). Not just obvious tankage and storage but issues of exposure to hazards while on deck, ease of handling sails, safety while in the cockpit, etc, etc. I'm always surpised to see people set off for a more than a daysail voyage without giving much thought to many of those issues.
You mean when the engine dies approaching the narrow inlet bordered by rock jetties, but the sail covers are back on, and the stopper to secure the anchor has already been set? Some people seem to forget that their diesel is only their AUX engine.

With electric furling on both my headsail & main, some would argue that having hank-on heavy weather sails is the safest way to undertake a passage. On my boat, they are only deployed in 30+ kt. conditions, so my current set-up would minimize the possibility of fouling. At the same time, who wants to leave the cockpit when it's blowing 30+ kts.?!
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Old 08-12-2014, 22:18   #719
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Re: The Yard Guys

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So who's bending facts again?
You are. By once again trying to demonstrate that certain brands of inexpensively manufactured boats are "unfairly maligned" because more reputable brands also suffer failures. It frankly makes about as much sense as "coastal" boats being built stronger than bluewater boats because . . . uhhhhh . . . they spend more time sailing the more dangerous coast??
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Old 08-12-2014, 22:27   #720
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Re: The Yard Guys

Uh-Oh . . .

Hunter 356 Bluewater Capable? - Cruisers & Sailing Forums
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