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Old 31-08-2008, 19:00   #1
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Teredo worms

Does anyone know if terdeo worms(shipworms) will eat pressure treated wood. any comments would be greatful...
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Old 31-08-2008, 22:35   #2
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What is the use you intend for pressure treated wood?
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Old 02-09-2008, 14:20   #3
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thank you.but does any body has any comments
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Old 02-09-2008, 14:31   #4
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As far as I know tanalith treated wood is impervious to teredo worm. In NZ most modern wooden boats used treated timber and are glassed over so for all intents and purposes they are the same as GRP to the worms.
All the harbour structures use heavily treated Tanalised piles, they used to be untreated Australian hardwood but once they found out pine piles when treated were protected they switched to the local product.
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Old 02-09-2008, 14:33   #5
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Any knots in the wood are very vulnerable since they don't treat well at all. That becomes the first place they attack.

If you are considering using conventional lumber yard treated wood the worms will have their way with it and it is unsuitable for continued exposure to water.
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Old 02-09-2008, 14:47   #6
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The dock pilings here have that green 'pressure treated' look to them.
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Old 02-09-2008, 15:04   #7
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The dock pilings here have that green 'pressure treated' look to them.
Looking green isn't the same thing. There still are a lot of arsenic treated posts out there and still legal in many places. Creosote pilings are petty much history. Pilings are treated to a much higher concentration than anything else.

We just did some repair work on our community dock of about 600 feet. It uses pilings and X braces. Many of the braces were like swiss cheese after only 12 years. Every knot was eaten out and from there they start munching more. Even these were treated heavier than just the basic treated lumber you use on your deck.

If it is submerged in the water it has to have a heavier marine treatment. Pilings tend to last about 25 years before the treatment gives out and the rot takes out much of the strength.
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Old 02-09-2008, 23:08   #8
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What is the use you intend for pressure treated wood?
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thank you.but does any body has any comments
Why won't you answer the question?
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Old 07-09-2008, 11:41   #9
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i wanted to build a wooden boat out of it.
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Old 07-09-2008, 12:06   #10
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i wanted to build a wooden boat out of it.
Well, it's your dime but the first question that comes to my mind is, "If pressure treated lumber was a suitable choice for boat building, why don't we ever see any boats built of it?"
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Old 07-09-2008, 14:03   #11
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Then you'd have the added problem that treated woods are all to some extent toxic to humans, you'd have to totally line/cover the wood so that you weren't in contact with it while aboard the boat. Might not want to sleep below decks, in case some of it gets in the air. All sorts of complications.

The sawdust from treated wood cutting is usually classed as Hazmat, too.

You'd be better off going to a wooden boat forum and asking them what they do about teredoes. Hauling, copper lining, keeping the boat in uninfested waters all seem to come to mind. Using treated wood? Uhuh.
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Old 07-09-2008, 14:11   #12
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i wanted to build a wooden boat out of it.
The watermen around here use pine lumber to patch up their old wooden deadrise boats. They don't have much money so they make do. It's not that it works so great but it is cheap. I suppose it could be argued that not evrything in this world is worth doing well, but if they could use something cheaper I am sure they already would.

You really don't have to use pressure treated wood. It won't last any longer and paint does not stick as well. If you are not really trying to build a seaworthy boat why spend the extra money?
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Old 07-09-2008, 14:31   #13
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Any pressure treated timber used in NZ boatbuilding is also coated with a dilute resin mix using metholated spirits (Alcohol) at around 50% which gives good penetration and seals the grain.
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Old 07-09-2008, 14:56   #14
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A few things not mentioned yet are that pressure treated wood is usually not boat quality lumber. It is also very wet and will shrink considerably as it dries. If you would use this stuff it would need to be air dried for a considerable amount of time before use. What type of boat? How big. What is the intended use?
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Old 07-09-2008, 17:02   #15
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Why not start at the beginning? Apparently you are choosing to build a traditional wooden planked boat out of treated lumber. Is that correct? If so, why? Traditional wooden boat construction is as rational today as using clay tablets for mass media. It's cost intensive, it's practically an art form practiced by very few craftsmen, and keeping the boat intact is a constant hassle.

Or, are you considering using it beneath a sheathing of epoxy, fiberglass or other composite materials? Again, why? It doesnt have the structural strength of most other wood materials, getting adhesives to bond to it can be tricky, and it's expensive. It makes no sense from a boat construction perspective.

It doesn't even make any sense from a "green" point of view. It costs more, it releases toxins into the air and water, and it doesn't hold up, requiring the use of more materials to repair it. Worst, if you choose to go adventuring off into the boonies, you won't find any similar materials you can use to repair it.
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