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Old 23-04-2007, 08:48   #1
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teak handrail frustration

hi,

Hey, I thought I'd bounce this question to all here. I have teak handrails on top of the cabin and also inside the cabin. They are typical Marinco/AFI type teak handrails. Topside handrails have an eight bolt set up (something like that), and the interior hand rails which affix to the cabin top are 5 loops. The five looped handrails in the cabin overhead use the same holes as the topside handrails, so in essence, five bolts connect both topside and interior hand rails together through the cabin top.

My problem is this, they use 3/16" x 4" SS bolts philips or straight head and nuts. But given that even with the teak plugs out, once can't get a socket set in between to hold the nut in place, while the admiral is topsides trying to tighten up the bolt. I was thinking trying to find longer bolts, but no suppliers sell 3/16" philips/straight headed screws in lengths of 5-6". (I've checked West marine, boat us, Defender , home depot etc). Does anyone else have ways they've solved this problem? Where it'll provide a secure hold, and still be serviceable later (if needs be).
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Old 23-04-2007, 09:12   #2
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It's probably too late for your situation, but I'm planning to use hanger bolts screwed into the handrails and secured in the cabin with barrel nuts. These bolts are available in lengths up to 5" from Jamestown. This will do away with the need to use plugs from the top. I have a plywood headliner so installed wood spacers where the bolts go through. Jamestown Distributors does have 5/16 screws to 6 inches long.
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Old 23-04-2007, 11:53   #3
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Would it be impractical to enlarge the holes from 3/16" to accept 1/4" bolts? You'll find it much easier to obtain 5" SS bolts in 1/4" than in 3/16", I think. Jamestown Distributors (marine supplies) has them, online.
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Old 23-04-2007, 14:10   #4
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Old 23-04-2007, 15:28   #5
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You can buy stainless threaded rod in 3/16ths - cut to the right length, file the ends a bit for a smooth starter thread, use a cap nut with lock tite for the top and a regular nut for the bottom Use a thin walled socket on each side and you should be able to keep the same 1/2" bungs as there is now.

Good luck
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Old 23-04-2007, 15:54   #6
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Is the problem that you can't get a socket over the nut inside the small diameter counter bored hole... the diameter of the bung? The threaded rod solves the length problem.. but not the socket diamter problem... unless you use very small diameter rod/nut and socket. You'll need washers and double nuts... or use locktite on the nut...
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Old 23-04-2007, 16:39   #7
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Here's a concept. The idea is to get a nut jammmed into one of your rails. This could be done by carefully drilling a hole which is close to the diameter of the nut. You would then use tighten a long bolt which will draw the nut into the hole... you can also use a claw hammer to lift the bolt head pulling the nutdeeper into the counter bored hole on the other rail. You can use a bit of epoxy to glye the nut to the wood. Once it is lodged in there you then withdraw the long screw/bolt and user the correct length screw/blot to tighten into the nut drawing both rails tight to the deck and head liner

You can also get threaded hex shapped connectors which are like supper thick nuts... or use a threaded insert which you screw into the hole and these accept a slotted or philips head bolt. Be careful to get the correct diameter so that you can put a bung on top. McMasterCarr has many different threaded inserts to choose from.

With a lodged in nut, you don't need a socket wrench on one side to tighten the bolt.
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Old 23-04-2007, 23:38   #8
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You could also use threaded inserts - these are metal things with a 3/16 thread on the inside, and a larger wood thread on the outside. Screw them into the bottom of the inside handrails and you could screw the old bolts through the outside handrails into the inserts.
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Old 24-04-2007, 05:18   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by defjef
Here's a concept. The idea is to get a nut jammmed into one of your rails. This could be done by carefully drilling a hole which is close to the diameter of the nut. You would then use tighten a long bolt which will draw the nut into the hole... you can also use a claw hammer to lift the bolt head pulling the nutdeeper into the counter bored hole on the other rail. You can use a bit of epoxy to glye the nut to the wood. Once it is lodged in there you then withdraw the long screw/bolt and user the correct length screw/blot to tighten into the nut drawing both rails tight to the deck and head liner

You can also get threaded hex shapped connectors which are like supper thick nuts... or use a threaded insert which you screw into the hole and these accept a slotted or philips head bolt. Be careful to get the correct diameter so that you can put a bung on top. McMasterCarr has many different threaded inserts to choose from.

With a lodged in nut, you don't need a socket wrench on one side to tighten the bolt.
Done some woodwork have ya.I think defjef solved that problem.I did something the same on a suspended table on a post on my back deck.But I fluked it.I know it works.Mudnut.
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Old 24-04-2007, 05:25   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thermal
You could also use threaded inserts - these are metal things with a 3/16 thread on the inside, and a larger wood thread on the outside. Screw them into the bottom of the inside handrails and you could screw the old bolts through the outside handrails into the inserts.
If the inserts are round on their OD,they might have a tendancy to slip loose over time without a lock nut.It sounds clean anyway.Mudnut.
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Old 24-04-2007, 05:31   #11
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Sorry Thermal,didn't read ya post right.Threads on the OD.That sounds even better now.Very Ikea.Mudnut.
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Old 24-04-2007, 07:36   #12
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teak handrail

Quote:
Originally Posted by defjef
Is the problem that you can't get a socket over the nut inside the small diameter counter bored hole... the diameter of the bung? The threaded rod solves the length problem.. but not the socket diamter problem... unless you use very small diameter rod/nut and socket. You'll need washers and double nuts... or use locktite on the nut...

Yes, can't get the socket over the nut given the tight diameter hole in the teak handrail.
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Old 24-04-2007, 08:20   #13
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teak handrail issue

I think I'll follow the KISS theory here. The ideas were great! But I think I'll expand the holes in the interior handrails , so it'll allow a deep socket to get good access to the nut on the machine screw.

Appreciate all the great ideas though! Will see how it works. It's awesome to hear some of the refit ideas people have..fuels the mind into what's possible!

Mark
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