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Old 16-08-2018, 10:51   #1
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Teak Decks on Newer Boats

I've read a great deal about the woes of older teak decks. Has anything changed with the construction of newer teak decks (say 2000-ish and on) that makes them less of a pain as the boat ages or will they eventually have the same issues as say a 1980's boat with teak decks?

For example - a nice Oyster like this - https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/200...g#.W3W5PoJG018

Is a boat like that likely to have expensive issues with its teak deck now or in the future? The ad mentions they were "re-caulked in 2017," so obviously some maintenance is required.
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Old 16-08-2018, 11:42   #2
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Re: Teak Decks on Newer Boats

Philos was splashed in 2001.
This winter, we're hauling her out and begin the fun job of restoring her teak deck ...

ALL the caulk has to be redone and some of the teak itself needs to be replaced.

Fun times ahead this winter

If anything, I think they use less (as in thinner) teak these days, which can become an issue with future maintenance.

IMHO ... Teak is lovely ... on other boats.
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Old 16-08-2018, 12:00   #3
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Re: Teak Decks on Newer Boats

Hah thank you syPhilos. That definitely clears it up some.
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Old 16-08-2018, 12:06   #4
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Re: Teak Decks on Newer Boats

Are those teak decks screwed or epoxied in place? I can't see any plugs for screws in the pics. They may be there, I simply can't see them.
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Old 16-08-2018, 12:14   #5
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Re: Teak Decks on Newer Boats

Two boats in my marina have been working all summer fixing up their plugged teak decks. One, a 42 foot trawler has replaced it completely. Looks lovely. The other, pulled it all up, rebedded and screwed down again.

I think screwing that many fasteners to the deck of a boat is nuts. If the teak is glued, as I have seen in some larger boats, that's presumably a lot better, apart from the sheer weight.
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Old 16-08-2018, 12:34   #6
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Re: Teak Decks on Newer Boats

The thought of putting a few thousand holes in a perfectly good deck makes my skin crawl. Our original teak deck was replaced by the PO, badly. We had to have the whole thing done again last year in Trinidad.
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Old 16-08-2018, 12:43   #7
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Re: Teak Decks on Newer Boats

Thanks for the replies all. I'm now going to ask what may be a dumb question:

Assuming the teak is glued on, and not nailed into the fiberglass (I assume is under it), why such issues with moisture?

Is it simply because the teak absorbs water and the water eventually permeates into the "under deck" causing that fiberglass to delaminate?
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Old 16-08-2018, 12:45   #8
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Re: Teak Decks on Newer Boats

We passed on buying a different Alden for that one reason - screwed teak. The boat we chose has glued teak and other than periodic cleaning, it's been problem free. And the appearance can't be beat.
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Old 16-08-2018, 12:55   #9
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Re: Teak Decks on Newer Boats

Quote:
Originally Posted by S/V Illusion View Post
We passed on buying a different Alden for that one reason - screwed teak. The boat we chose has glued teak and other than periodic cleaning, it's been problem free. And the appearance can't be beat.
Thanks. That's good to know. Any idea whether these modern (2000-ish) Oysters are screwed on or glued?
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Old 16-08-2018, 13:02   #10
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Re: Teak Decks on Newer Boats

Our 2001 Oyster 53 definitely has glued down decks with no possibilty of water intrusion. We refinished and recaulked the entire deck 2 years ago which required over 400 hours, now they look great.

BTW: Ours is presently for sale for not much more than the 47 you’re looking at and located in a much better location for cruising. Please check it out.

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/200...dard%20listing
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Old 16-08-2018, 13:16   #11
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Re: Teak Decks on Newer Boats

Funny. That's actually the boat I was going to include in this thread. Small world. Beautiful boat. Wish I could say I was a serious buyer, but at this point just researching. Thanks though.
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Old 20-08-2018, 22:32   #12
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Re: Teak Decks on Newer Boats

I'm not sure when it first started, but teak decks today are mostly "bonded' to the fibreglass sub deck, as opposed to screwing it down. Done properly, & using the right equipment, it is not a job for the amateur or weekend Mr. Fixit.
I did not do this work myself, but here's what I observed from a safe vantage point.
Depending on whether you want the planking to lie straight fore & aft, or (as I did), bent to the same curvature as the gunn'ls … if the latter, it may be better to lay up panels on the workshop floor, epoxied to fibreglass cloth, & caulked between the strips with Boatlife caulk product. You can then take the pre-formed panels & apply them directly onto the boat as follows:
First, you need to have a scrupulously clean f/g sub deck, with all signs of gelcoat gloss sanded off, to provide a 'keyed' surface that the Boatlife product can aggressively adhere to.
Apply a coat of Boatlife caulk (being sure to leave no 'holidays'), using a plastic putty knife with a medium serrated edge. Coat both deck area & the underside of the teak panel. Then, lay the panel on the appropriate deck area, making sure it is properly aligned. Apply a continuous strip of Butyl surrounding the area you are working on, to enable you to seal off the entire area with 6mil plastic sheeting. Install the quick connect adaptor in the plastic sheet & attach the hose from your industrial Vacuum machine & switch it on to evacuate all air, thus allowing atmospheric pressure to be applied over the whole teak panel. Be sure to leave the pump to run for about 12 hours.

Next day:
Check a test spot of the Boatlife caulk to see if it has cured, or 'kicked off' … if it has, remove the plastic sheet, prepare & continue to the next section. If not, leave the vacuum machine running until the goop has cured or kicked off.
After you are satisfied the entire deck is done, take an orbital sander (not random orbital) with a medium grit, & sand the surface to an even finish. Do not sand heavily, you're basically only 'cleaning' the teak surface; you're not "sanding it down".

And, if you can get through this operation without becoming covered almost entirely from head to toe in Boatlife caulk, I'll buy the drinks.
In actual fact, you'd be far better off leaving it to the professionals … it's so much easier.
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Old 20-08-2018, 22:51   #13
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Re: Teak Decks on Newer Boats

Newer glued on teak is far better in that you don't have the holes and you can sand back without risking the plugs. Even fairly thin teak can be sanded back eventually. Ours is 14 years old and starting to look tired (extreme uv down here in nz). Lightly sanding to refinish brings it up like new. Measuring an inconspicuous area leads me to think this could be done at least another two times, so if that's every 10 years or so that will be a significant lifespan. Fortunately (and planned) we only have teak around the cockpit area -the entire deck would be a much bigger job.
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