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Old 11-06-2010, 09:31   #1
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Stuff About Diesels and Crossover Parts

The following was gathered from a variety of sources over the last several years. The first article by Blais of DIY explains about VP engines and gives some cross over parts listings as well.

Some things to share.....while I'm still hooked up to the net.

blaismarine@aol.com
to me
More options Jun 14
Hi Michael,

I just got in from teaching another class, this one at the wooden boat school in Port Townsend. Strange, but I was thinking about you earlier today, then here comes your email.

Those filters are getting easier to find, if you know where to look, and this is why:

Your engine is what Perkins calls a 103-10. Perkins started importing these 100 series engines from a Japanese company called Ishikawajima Shibaura Machinery, Ltd. nearly twenty years ago. ISM is part of Ishikawajima Harima Industries, one of Japan’s largest industrial companies. Perkins marketed this engine in a marinized version as the Perama M30. They sold the engine to Volvo Penta who marketed it as their MD2030. They also sold the engine to Massey Ferguson, McCormick, Terramite, Textron, Jacobsen, Cushman, Vermeer, Leech Lewis, JCB, Kobelco, and Northern Lights to name just a few. In the US, the engine was distributed thru Detroit Diesel – Allison which is closely tied to the MTU conglomerate. By 1996, Perkins had become so successful at marketing these engines to other equipment manufacturers that they formed a joint venture with ISM called Perkins Shibaura Engines, Ltd. and began assembling the engines at the Perkins facility in Peterborough, UK from parts shipped from Japan. In 1997, Perkins was acquired by Caterpillar. With an added boost from Caterpillar, this little engine has become one of the most popular engines in the world. It’s used in turf equipment, tractors, mini-excavators, brush choppers, compressors, welders, pumps, generators, etc. etc. etc. Even Caterpillar uses it in some of their smaller equipment. The “Perkins” name was highlighted on the engine ID plate which is located on a distinctive boss just forward of the injection pump. The 2006 model year’s production of the engine has “Shibaura” highlighted on the ID plate. In 2001, the larger Shibaura 400 series engine was introduced with assembling at Peterborough, UK from parts mostly from Japan, and in June, 2004 assembling of the 400 series engine began at a Caterpillar facility in Griffin, Georgia, USA with production exceeding 100,000 units per year.

Perkins’ current part number for the oil filter is 140517050 and sells here in Kent, WA at Perkins Pacific for $6.85. At least that was the price a couple of months ago. All the earlier Perkins oil filter part numbers for this series of engine have superseded to this number. And all the engines in this series (two, three, and four cylinder 100 series) are supposed to take the same filter. I believe that Volvo’s part number is or was 834337. The filter should be readily available from any of the other equipment manufacturer’s using the engine including Caterpillar, and from many of the major filter manufacturers.

I think the numbers you had were:

Oil Filter = Fleetguard LF3826 or LF3376, Wix 51335, Fram PH3512, NAPA FIL1335.
Diesel Filter = Fleetguard LF5114, Wix 33386, Fram P3627, NAPA FIL3386, Volvo 861477-8?.

Disclaimer: Before using any parts suggested here, check them out for yourself, I could be mistook.


NEXT

Forgive the long post but I can't help myself, someone may enjoy it, and I'm a nut (of the diesel variety) that just loves this stuff. I might mention that I use "Ode De diesel #2" cologne.
The are many many factors at play here and "base" timing is just one. It's actually a minor one that is fairly easy to control when we're talking about alt fuels and fuel additives. Ernie is right Micheal that the BOI "beginning of injection" on a diesel engine is the controlling factor for "base timing", not the heat in the cylinder, where moment of ignition (spark) controls this in a SI engine. Of course if we want to get deep enough into theory and discuss the actual "ignition lag period" which IS affected by cylinder temps (therefore water temp, air temp, etc.) but these change all the time and over the life of the engine and only vary the actual BOI little.
Although the heat for ignition is provided via the temperature of the compressed air in the cylinder at BOI, on both SI (spark ignition) engines (I.e. gasoline) and CI (compression ignition) engines (I.e. diesel due to it's credited inventor, Rudolf Diesel) much more is happening than just "when the flame front starts" which is what you're talking about. The real complications come when you begin to look at the ignition event on a millisecond time line after combustion begins. Diesel fuel, as well as carrying much more BTU value, is a much more stable fuel, from the point of flame propagation, than the fuels used in SI engines, including gasoline, methanol, blends thereof, etc. The main destructive factor re: fuel in a SI engine is detonation... you know that "knock sound" or what has been called many things including, "the valves knocking" which is totally misleading. Well it's actually the meeting of two (or possibly more) flame fronts in the cylinder.
*One is created via the spark plug. (This is the one we want, hopefully at the time we wanted it.)
*The second one is crated via compression ignition shortly thereafter (remember milliseconds time line here), due to the pressure wave produced by the first flame front. This has A LOT to do with cylinder temps as well as many other factors including combustion chamber design, and most important in this conversation is: the fuel! I.e. low octane/low lead fuels in high temp/ high compression engines. When these two flame fronts meet the resulting "knock" you hear is produced but a pressure spike that can literally destroy the engine. I.e. broken rings, broken ring lands, melted pistons, scored cylinder walls, etc.
NOW: Your "expensive diesel engine" is for one, a damn site tougher than your "expensive gas engine" and it is much much more tolerant to alternate fuels use than a gas engine. Take a look into the military's multi-fuel diesels. A diesel will actually burn damn near anything very well if you can get it injected into the cylinders. (Look into the heavy fuel diesel engines that burn "bunker-C" and the use of coal/fuel slurry in diesels. You see the lower you get in the crude oil frack, the more BTUs are in the fuel. The problem is getting them to burn and release this energy in the time allotted. This is why a diesel produces much more torque (what actually turns the shaft) that can a gas engine. However, since it takes more time for diesel fuel to burn and release this energy, the combustion event must occur at a slower pace I.e. lower RPM. This also adds to it's efficiency as it gets more time to actually shove on the piston while the crank throw is at an angle where you can actually "use" the energy. Think about it... a 4cycle engine must turn 720 degrees for one power event of each cylinder. Of this 720, the power stroke is only 180 degrees of it. Of this 180 degrees that we can have a 'fire in er', no matter how much pressure we put on the piston at the actual top or the bottom of the stroke, it won't produce ANY turning force since the crank throw is either straight up or straight down. At only 90 degrees will it produce maximum turning force and at all other points of the stroke the energy will be sacrificed in relation to the angle of the crank throw. I.e. at 45 degrees you will only extract 1/2 of what ever energy is possible. Think about it... A diesel turning at low speeds has much more time to actually shove on the piston and much more energy available in the fuel.
You know I sure would have enjoyed this more over a few beers...
BTW: "tetraethyl lead" did have some cushioning effects on the valve seat surfaces, (not really a lubricant at all) but was used more as a controlling additive in all this process. Other additives have helped replace it now but they didn't help out the valve seats much. See:
Lead TetraEthyl and MTBE
BTW: "sulfur" damn sure was not a good thing in diesel fuel and sure as hell wasn't a lubricant. The process used to remove it however, did result in a diesel fuel that had lubricity problems. See:
Stanadyne White Paper on Diesel Fuel
In the category of helpful tips I post this every once in a while. Primarily cause we V-P owners grouse about the high cost of V-P parts. The source is Larry Blais, diesel guru, instructor, surveyor and author. At the bottom is the filter cross reference numbers that will make your budget smile! This engine is made/sold by 20 or so manufacturers you may have one and not know it...Read on.

" blaismarine@aol.com
to me
More options Jun 14
Hi Michael,
I just got in from teaching another class, this one at the wooden boat school in Port Townsend. Strange, but I was thinking about you earlier today, then here comes your email.
Those filters are getting easier to find, if you know where to look, and this is why:
Your engine is what Perkins calls a 103-10. Perkins started importing these 100 series engines from a Japanese company called Ishikawajima Shibaura Machinery, Ltd. nearly twenty years ago. ISM is part of Ishikawajima Harima Industries, one of Japan’s largest industrial companies. Perkins marketed this engine in a marinized version as the Perama M30. They sold the engine to Volvo Penta who marketed it as their MD2030. They also sold the engine to Massey Ferguson, McCormick, Terramite, Textron, Jacobsen, Cushman, Vermeer, Leech Lewis, JCB, Kobelco, and Northern Lights to name just a few. In the US, the engine was distributed thru Detroit Diesel – Allison which is closely tied to the MTU conglomerate. By 1996, Perkins had become so successful at marketing these engines to other equipment manufacturers that they formed a joint venture with ISM called Perkins Shibaura Engines, Ltd. and began assembling the engines at the Perkins facility in Peterborough, UK from parts shipped from Japan. In 1997, Perkins was acquired by Caterpillar. With an added boost from Caterpillar, this little engine has become one of the most popular engines in the world. It’s used in turf equipment, tractors, mini-excavators, brush choppers, compressors, welders, pumps, generators, etc. etc. etc. Even Caterpillar uses it in some of their smaller equipment. The “Perkins” name was highlighted on the engine ID plate which is located on a distinctive boss just forward of the injection pump. The 2006 model year’s production of the engine has “Shibaura” highlighted on the ID plate. In 2001, the larger Shibaura 400 series engine was introduced with assembling at Peterborough, UK from parts mostly from Japan, and in June, 2004 assembling of the 400 series engine began at a Caterpillar facility in Griffin, Georgia, USA with production exceeding 100,000 units per year.
Perkins’ current part number for the oil filter is 140517050 and sells here in Kent, WA at Perkins Pacific for $6.85. At least that was the price a couple of months ago. All the earlier Perkins oil filter part numbers for this series of engine have superseded to this number. And all the engines in this series (two, three, and four cylinder 100 series) are supposed to take the same filter. I believe that Volvo’s part number is or was 834337. The filter should be readily available from any of the other equipment manufacturer’s using the engine including Caterpillar, and from many of the major filter manufacturers.
Oil Filter = Fleetguard LF3826 or LF3376, Wix 51335, Fram PH3512, NAPA FIL1335.
Diesel Filter = Fleetguard LF5114, Wix 33386, Fram P3627, NAPA FIL3386, Volvo 861477-8?.
Disclaimer: Before using any parts suggested here, check them out for yourself."
Larry teaches a lot of classes for UDUB in Seattle and the Wooden Boat School at Port Townsend. Also writes for DIY.
_________________

THIRD

Because of the recent post on a hard starting westerbeke and my previous training against the use of anything that might unduly influence the combustion point of the engine unless you know what it is and how it will act I found out about WD40. Posted a notice for more information in the marine diesel BBS and received the following. The first is from powertech down in the Florida Keys. The second is the sticky note from the BBS administrators. The spelling is entirely not mine but to the education (and thanks for telling me about WD40) I'll lay claim.
This should provide some help to all with diesels.
1. posted in the diesel BBS by powertech
"WD40 is a good diesel starting fluid.
you can use it to help diagnose starting troubles. you just take the air filter or scilencer of and spray it in full blast. you have to use the arisol can type. the liquid in the gallon jug you put in a hand squiter dont work.
i have found that it only works good in non after cooled engines. i only use it in small natural engines.
on larger turbo and especialy aftercooled engines ,teh WD40 falls out of the air and don't make it into the cylinders . .
with wd40 you can squirt the can in there full blast,and run the engine off of it,and cause teh engine no harm.

WD40 will start a diesel engine ,but teh diesel has to have some fuel being injected. it can be a weak amount of only a few injectors but it needs something to run and stay running.
say you have a motor with some crusty valve seats that will not start couse teh compresion is low. you just crank and crank teh motor over while spraying WD40 into it and after a while it just might start. if it does not,well then you know it is sick.
say you have a motor that just don't want to blead well you can spray wd40 down it's throat and get it to run ,to clear it out or whatever.
it is a good way to easyly and quickly see if a motor is sick and tired or just internaly #$%#ed ...if the damn thing is getting fuel and it wont even run on WD40 you know she is sick.

2. The following is a sticky post in the diesel starting forum of the diesel BBS
"Quoted material begins
Nearly every week customers ask us about how to overcome starting
difficulties with their diesel engine. Nearly as often, the
subject of starting fluids and ether accompanies the
conversation. It appears that we all want a quick fix. Instead
of getting to the root of the problem we look for a magic potion
that will solve the problem in a spray form.
Not only does the use of ether not solve the problem, it also is
liable to shorten the life of the engine by causing serious
damage. The damage could include cracked piston ring grooves or
the rings and pistons themselves. When a cylinder fires from
normal injection, the fuel burns for the entire stroke of the
piston. Ether explodes when the compression gets it hot enough
and that could be well before the piston is at the top of its
compression stroke and the forces exerted are well beyond the
design of the engine.
Our recommendation is simple. Stay away from ether.
There are a number of things that must be right to start any
engine, especially on the first try of the day. Here is a
summary list you should consider (not in any specific order):
1 - Valves should be properly adjusted
2 - Starter motor must be in good condition - after years of
service, it is not unlikely that there is wear in the starter
motor that slows its speed. Slow speed can be critical to cold
starts.
3 - Battery - if it is nearing the end of its life or wasn't
rated properly to begin with, it could be the cause of slower
starter motor speed. Batteries must be of good quality and
fully charged.
4 - Battery cables must be properly sized and in good condition.
All connectors should be clean. Tight connection does not always
mean a good connection. Failing wires and/or the connections
could result in reduced power to the starter motor
5 - Lubricating oil should be to specification.
6 - Fuel octane level should be 45 or higher. A good quality
fuel is an important part of running your diesel engine.
7 - The end of the fuel return line should be submerged in fuel.
8 - Injection timing - very critical and the most difficult to
correct. This should be the last thing to evaluate and correct.
If evaluation and correction of the above doesn't give the
results you want, the symptoms are those of lowered compression.
A compression test, made with the proper tester, can confirm
this. You may even want to do this before trying to set the
injection timing.
In the mean time - if you have access to electrical power, try
putting the output of a hair dryer into the air inlet on the
engine for a few minutes before the first start of the day. It
can work wonders, but it won't correct your problems.
Hard starting can be attributed to a number of reasons, including
compression, HP fuel pump, fuel, air intake, injector, injection
timing, etc.
If you have used ether, there is a good chance that you have
broken a piston or possibly a piston ring. Try taking the
compression with your rubber nosed compression tester. If you can
hold it in the hole, your compression is too low. You are looking
for pressures that approach 400PSIG and it takes a pretty
sophisticated set-up to read it. "
URL for the diesel forum is: Torresen Marine, Inc. - Sailing and Boating Forums • Index page

FOURTH

VOLVO ENGINE MANUALS
MD1B, MD2B, MD3B Workshop Manual (10 MB)
MD5A Workshop Manual (2.3 MB)
MD6A Owners Manual (4.1MB)
MD6A & MD7A Workshop Manual (1.6 MB)
MD11C&D & MD17C&D Workshop Manual (3.1 MB)
2002 Owners Manual (3.8 MB)
2002 Workshop Manual (5.5 MB)
2010-20-30-40 Workshop Manual (2.3 MB)
OTHER ENGINE MANUALS
Perkins-4.107,_4.108 and 4.99 (14.8MB)
Bukh DV10 Owners Manual (2.6MB)
Yanmar GM Series Owners Manual (0.2MB)

http://www.bluemoment.com/manuals/Vo...0-20-30-40.pdf

FIFTH SIXTH and SEVENTH in the next thread.

Cheers

Michael D
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Old 11-06-2010, 09:46   #2
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OMG Michael

Thats the sexiest post ive ever read here. I realy wish we could discuss it more over a few beers. There is so much more to talk about including bio blends and SVO and their use in both DI and indirect heads plus the potential damage to cooler running engines and the polymerisation of lube and ring gumming dont you think?
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Old 11-06-2010, 10:37   #3
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I had to go re-read it to see what I missed. But you're right. It wants more discussion so have at it. I'm going to be on sporadically for some weeks then intermittently then rarely as I'm getting Se Langt ready for a test sail series then down the coast to California and finally.....lots of long passages..cause you see there's this island.....

Cheers

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