Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 09-08-2009, 07:21   #1
Registered User
 
Beausoleil's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Potomac Shores, VA USA
Boat: Formosa 51 Aft Cockpit Ketch - "Beausoleil"
Posts: 565
Images: 1
Stripping Varnish from Teak Wheel

I know I probably won't like the answer, but I'll ask anyway: other than paying service someone a few hundred to strip varnish off of a teak wheel, is there any method other than varnish remover and elbow grease?



This isn't Beausoleil's wheel, but it's identical...
__________________

__________________
Cap'n Jon (KB1HTW)
S/V Beausoleil -1979 Formosa 51 Ketch
"If it's gonna happen, it's gonna happen out there." - Captain Ron
Beausoleil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2009, 07:24   #2
Registered User
 
anjou's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Malvernshire, on the sunny side of the hill.
Boat: 50' steel canal and river cruiser
Posts: 1,905
Sand blast or plastic bead blast
__________________

__________________
www.amy-artimis.blogspot.com
anjou is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2009, 07:32   #3
Registered User
 
rcmpegasus's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: San Diego & Port Townsend
Boat: Formosa 51 Ketch
Posts: 143
Images: 1
Send a message via Skype™ to rcmpegasus
Hot air gun and a scraper, a couple hours of work. A contour sander tool for touching up helps.
__________________
Bob Mathews
S/V Pegasus
rcmpegasus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2009, 08:37   #4
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 1,848
Probably a combo of chemical stripper and sanding. I fear blasting would be a bit to harsh
__________________
motion30 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2009, 11:05   #5
Moderator Emeritus
 
David M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: research vessel
Posts: 10,150
Blasting will remove wood. Heat guns can burn the wood. Scrapers can gouge the wood. What works best in my experience is a chemical stripper. The environmentally safe ones do not work very well at all. I prefer the Jasco stripper.
__________________
David

Life begins where land ends.
David M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2009, 11:09   #6
Registered User
 
anjou's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Malvernshire, on the sunny side of the hill.
Boat: 50' steel canal and river cruiser
Posts: 1,905
Blasting can be as harsh or gentle as you need it to be. Variations in air pressure and choice of the right medium ensure only the right amount of material is removed.I blast clean the Meonite compressor blades in turbos, and they have to be ballanced to within 100,000s of a gram. Spinning at over 250,000 rpm leaves no room for error.
__________________
www.amy-artimis.blogspot.com
anjou is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-04-2010, 22:14   #7
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 153
I used good old methylene chloride professional stripper. The nasty stuff. Instructions said you could scrape it off or rinse it off with hot water. Surprisingly, the hot water worked better.......had the wheel in the bathtub, with a green Scotchbrite pad.

I repeated the stripping several times. Then oxalic acid and TSP.

What are you planning to put on it? I went for Bristol Finish which is more like an epoxy than varnish. I do not recommend it. Yes, I could go wet on wet and build coats up fast, but now I am sanding prior to the finish coat and I fear I may never be done.
__________________
SailPenelope is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-04-2010, 23:21   #8
Registered User
 
Butler's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Los Angeles
Boat: Pearson 281
Posts: 678
Images: 18
I normaly use a heat gun and scraper which as others have indicated can be tricky.
In order to keep from gouging you have to risk scorching... a fine line for sure and something I would not want to try to do with a wheel like that.

I had a job chemicaly stripping fine furniture once during college and that experience taught me that as long as you rinse in a timely and thorough way with clean water you will avoid staining the wood or messing up the varnishes ability to stick.
I think that would be the way to go with this wheel.

I don't like oxalic acid...too much, IMHO but I know plenty of people who use it and are happy and I am less fussy than most about an even color to the wood.

TSP (the real powder not the fakey stuff in the jug) and warm water is a great way dry the wood out, cutting the oil in the teak so the varnish has an even better chance to stick. Be sure to thoroughly wet the wood and then apply it evenly/thoroughly.. I use a soft brown nylon scrubbie don't dwaddle over the piece and make sure it is thoroughly rinsed... just to be thorough ya wanna do a thorough job and I am thoroughly freaked by my continued use of this word...

Anyway.. it'll definately take a bit of patience but how freakin pretty. The results make varnishing worth it still for me though I get impatient sometimes with the prep. Some guy once motored by me while I was putting down a first coat yelling "you sucker, you'll just have to do it again next year" he was pretty hostile...must have been an advanced case of brightwork aversion stemming from a bad experience as a child on his parent's boat.
__________________
Butler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2010, 00:40   #9
Senior Cruiser
 
rebel heart's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 6,190
Images: 3
I do everything with heatguns and scrapers. The chemical stuff has always been more difficult for me to work with. You won't burn the wood if you put it on a lower setting and keep it several inches back. The real pain in the butt parts will be the tiny nooks and crannies. I think you could knock it out in a day. Honestly it's a good spot to do it, because you can sit in your cockpit comfy, spin the wheel to eye level, lock the wheel, and do your thing. Adjust when you have that section done.

The harder the varnish and removal would be, the more likely it is to get a cover on our boat.

Also, I use Flagship. Easy to put on. I use foam brushes, and for the last coat cut with the 222 (or whatever that product is) thinner.
__________________
rebel heart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2010, 00:54   #10
Registered User
 
tager's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Vashon, WA
Boat: Haida 26', 18' Sea Kayak, 15' kayak, 6.5' skiff, shorts
Posts: 837
Heat gun. Just bought one today for this very purpose. Best 19.99 ever spent by anyone.
__________________
tager is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2010, 01:04   #11
Senior Cruiser
 
rebel heart's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 6,190
Images: 3
As far as a heatgun, I would highly recommend the Milwaukee 8975-6. I've (literally) burned through a few other models, and this is the only one that can keep up with me. Really been happy with it.

Amazon.com: Milwaukee 8975-6 11.6 Amp 570/1000-Degree Fahrenheit Dual Temperature Heat Gun: Home Improvement

On the lower setting you can also use it for flexing up sanitary hoses before putting them on fittings and de-icing a fridge. Heat guns are super handy onboard.
__________________
rebel heart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2010, 05:20   #12
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 647
My wheel is exactly like yours with the exception that mine has a stainless steel rim. This winter I bought it home and removed 10 years worth of the standard Cetrol using a heat gun, a scrapper and sandpaper(80 grit and then 220). I don't remember how long it took since I like to forget tedious items, but it went well. I redid the wheel with 3 coats of cetrol natural and then 2 coats of the gloss. Looks great.
__________________
lancelot9898 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2010, 14:33   #13
Registered User
 
anglooff's Avatar

Join Date: May 2007
Location: Boat in Panama
Boat: Vandestadt ketch 42
Posts: 357
Whichever method you chose...use patience... two years ago I decided to clean off some twenty years of previous owners annual varnishes. I became impatient and used a hand sander and scraped a few gouges. Noone else sees them but everytime I pass the wheel my eyes are drawn to them and I whisper a silent apology. The last part of my refit will be to buy a new one.

Regards

Alan
__________________

__________________
anglooff is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
stripping, varnish

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:36.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.