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Old 15-10-2009, 07:40   #1
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Strip Planking

Does anyone know where to get bronze finish nail? I've looked at some of the links posted in wooden boat forum and the only bronze nails I've found is the boat nails with the flat heads.

Looks like several suppliers have finish nails in copper, can they be used for strip planking?
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Old 15-10-2009, 12:47   #2
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Originally Posted by weedeater64 View Post
Does anyone know where to get bronze finish nail? I've looked at some of the links posted in wooden boat forum and the only bronze nails I've found is the boat nails with the flat heads.

Looks like several suppliers have finish nails in copper, can they be used for strip planking?

You mean like this?
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Old 15-10-2009, 13:06   #3
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Why would you want to use finishing nails (essentially “headless”) on strip planking?

Maren has linked to “Common Flat” nail heads; whereas a finishing nail is designed to conceal the installed nail, but has limited holding power (see below).
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Old 15-10-2009, 14:25   #4
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-- or are you looking for clenches (normally used with roves).

Try Jamestown Distributors.
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Old 15-10-2009, 14:57   #5
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Check out the fastenings section in chapters 3.3 & 3.5 of
USCG Guidance on Inspection, Repair, and Maintenance of Wooden Hulls (NVIC 7-95)
http://www.uscg.mil/hq/cg5/nvic/pdf/1995/n7-95.pdf

"Clenching" occurs on the inside of the fastening, and still uses a common/flat head nail.
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Old 15-10-2009, 15:25   #6
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Gord,

Your correct in the context of the process of "clenching".

In an attempt to help the OP, I was guiding him in the direction of the square section, pyramid headed,copper boat nail, which is why I referred to the rove.
In this area, we call them a clench nail.

Have driven and clenched thousands of them in the Royal Navy 52ft pinnaces, double diagonal, 3/4" teak hull.
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Old 15-10-2009, 15:37   #7
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I think if your strip planking your not clenching or using roves. I have not stripplanked but I have seen brnze boat nails used. Terminology as I understand is a clench nail is a nail usually square cut copper nail that is curled back like a hook as it comes through plank and frame or 2 planks as in lapstrake contruction. Usually smaller boats and canoes. No roves are used with clench nailing.
Riveting a copper nail uses a rove the nail is set through the plank and frame the rove/washer is set on the inside around the nail. the nail is cut near the rove and peined over like a rivet using a ball and pein hammer. On larger boats one guy stood outside holding a dead weight against the head while inside another tapped away.
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Old 15-10-2009, 15:41   #8
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Quote:
Why would you want to use finishing nails (essentially “headless”) on strip planking?
Because, Rabl, Buehler, and Chapelle all agree that, that's how it's done.

None of them explain why, but in my thinking it's so the next strip will lay flat.


Quote:
Maren has linked to “Common Flat” nail heads; whereas a finishing nail is designed to conceal the installed nail, but has limited holding power (see below).
Rabl explains (which I learned from my brother when I was a kid) that to gain holding power you toe nails at varied angles.
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Old 15-10-2009, 15:47   #9
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Yep

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Because, Rabl, Buehler, and Chapelle all agree that, that's how it's done.





Rabl explains (which I learned from my brother when I was a kid) that to gain holding power you toe nails at varied angles.
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Old 16-10-2009, 04:31   #10
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My memory may be faulty but...

My memory may be faulty but I seem to remember something about strip planking being fastened to the frames. This may have been done with screws but if the planks were narrow and the screws large it resulted in unacceptable weakening of the planks.

I seem to remember recommended practice being to stagger screws so that only every third or fourth frame (check with designer) was screwed to.

Nails may be driven between strip planks to fasten one strip plank to another strip plan. In this case the Finishing nails discussed may be appropriate.

Can't find my old copy but memory suggest that the Gougeon Bros. recommended gluing the strip planks together with an epoxy glue.

There could be some confusion with cold moulding where the veneers are stapled, or with clinker (memory may be faulty) where the planks are held on with copper rivets driven through the plank (drill first?) then peened over a copper washer on the inside (forget correct names).

Clinker boats are normally quite small.

We are talking about cruising yachts here?
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Old 16-10-2009, 10:43   #11
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This may have been done with screws but if the planks were narrow and the screws large it resulted in unacceptable weakening of the planks.
I'll keep that in mind.
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Old 16-10-2009, 11:57   #12
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What shape of strip planks are you using? "Cove and Bead" or just a square or rectangular plank section. You gonna edge glue them or use a modern flexible adhesive between the planks.
During the sixties I was on a building crew for a few 42ft Carolina type sport fisherman. Sawn long leaf pine frames and white cedar 1 1/8" x 2" planks. Fastened the 1 1/8" thickness to the frames with 2 1/2" Anchorfast ring nails. Edge nailed (and Weldwood glued) with 3" Anchorfast ring nails, holes predrilled. Belt-sanded on the tumblehome and disc-faired up under the bow flare. Finished like glass with oil based enamels back then.
Hope this helps.
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Old 16-10-2009, 12:07   #13
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What shape of strip planks are you using? "Cove and Bead" or just a square or rectangular plank section. You gonna edge glue them or use a modern flexible adhesive between the planks.
During the sixties I was on a building crew for a few 42ft Carolina type sport fisherman. Sawn long leaf pine frames and white cedar 1 1/8" x 2" planks. Fastened the 1 1/8" thickness to the frames with 2 1/2" Anchorfast ring nails. Edge nailed (and Weldwood glued) with 3" Anchorfast ring nails, holes predrilled. Belt-sanded on the tumblehome and disc-faired up under the bow flare. Finished like glass with oil based enamels back then.
Hope this helps.
Cove and bead sounds like the way to go for ease, but if it adds considerably to cost it'll be out. Don't know what size strips yet. I've ordered the study plans for Wharrams Child of the Sea, but I think I'd like a similar design of around 30 feet. Not sure I'd put any glue/adhesive between the planks. Not sure why anyone does that.
Don't know which wood either yet, but I know it'll be grown in the US probably eastern US.
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Old 16-10-2009, 15:10   #14
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In my experience the shape of the strip plank, and whether or not you use something between the planks, has an effect on the strength and rigidity of the complete assembly. For instance, the male/female configuration of cove and bead eliminates the gaps on the exterior when used on a compound surface of hull shape, and contributes to a monocoque type of skin, and might not need edge nailing.
Rectangular planks, not having the advantage of the locking effect of cove and bead, might tend to separate under impact if not glued and edge nailed. Especially on lightly framed mboats with large unsupported areas of skin, or flat surfaced hulls.
I admit to not being construction familiar with Wharam designed, but aren't they designed for sheet material construction?
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Old 16-10-2009, 16:49   #15
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Have a look through my threads on my build and pics in my gallery and do some more searches on strip planking.

You don't use nails for strip planking, it adds unnecessary weight, expense and stuffs up the planer blades.

I have built and been involved in more than a few large strip plank boats.................never a nail was used. Temporary screws and staples to hold planks to temporary frames while glue /resin cured, always removed but never any permanent metal.

Square edged planks have mostly been used, far more cost effective than profiled edges.
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