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Old 03-11-2005, 07:23   #1
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Standing Rigging

New (old) boat just acquired. Planning Atlantic crossing next summer...

One of the numerous things on the list is to review all the standing rigging.

My plan is to shimmie up the mast (no small feat for a fat bugger like me!) and have a good review of the rigging. If I find serious flaws, I will have the mast taken off for the winter to facilitate repairs/upgrades. However, if there's not much that needs doing, is it possible to leave the mast up and attend to the deficiencies while the boat's on the hard?

What can and can't be done with the mast in place?
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Old 03-11-2005, 09:07   #2
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Bill,

First what did the surveyor do and report?

Before going aloft how good is the running rigging? Use two halyards. If the mast has not been pulled in a while it might be very useful to do so. Besides rigging you'll have a chance to inspect the sheaves, wiring, the shoe etc. Also you'll be assured that all the turnbuckles are ok. And if it's a furling jib a chance to check that out too. I think you'll do a much better job of inspecting on the ground rather than in a bosun's chair.

We pull our masts (belong to a DIY club) every fall up here. Mine has double spreaders so it's a bit trickier. I've been aloft many times but never on the hard, for some reason that scares me.
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Old 03-11-2005, 09:27   #3
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i have a new (used) boat this year. i pulled the stick. next year i won't, but i wanted to inspect mast step and associated drain hole, plus shieves and all fasteners on mast. i am anal on this stuff, and will swap out stuff even if it looks okay. fatigue and cracks in cotter pins, clevis, insulation on wiring where it enters mast, etc. is not always easy to spot. it is easier with the stick out because i can go to yard several times, and the items i am swapping out are easy for me to work on standing on the ground with all tools available. i also find my slow brain gets a better chance to understand what i have up there and i can snap photos as needed. my yard charges more to pull stick, but then less to shrink, so it is not a big dif - maybe $300.- if that keeps me from having to up when offshore - i'll take that deal.
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Old 03-11-2005, 09:56   #4
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Bill,

My 2 cents here, If you really are planning on crossing the Atlantic, pull the stick - it's cheap insurance, and replace your standing rigging. It's not that expensive and you won't have to worry about it for a long time and increases your chances to make it across the pond.
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Old 03-11-2005, 11:23   #5
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I agree with the others who suggest pulling the stick.

Located in Massachusetts, your rig will experience freezing temperatures. Water can wick into the strands of wire, then expand when it freezes, causing the swage terminals to crack. Remove the wire rigging, and store in a dry (warm, if possible) environment.

Once the rig is down, check the Deck Step, and the Mast Butt. The step and mast extrusion should be provided with water drain slots.

I believe that Pacific Seacraft uses 304 Stainless rigging. Many riggers advise that 316 grade stainless (higher nickel content) is the right choice for the marine environment. While 304 actually has a higher breaking strength when new (less nickel), it will be significantly weaker after a few years of salt water service.*

* See “Chain Plates 316 or 304":
http://www.cruisersforum.com/showthr...&threadid=1745

See Also “Rig Maintenance & Tuning”:
http://www.cruisersforum.com/showthr...&threadid=1290

And “In the Event of Rig Failure”: http://www.cruisersforum.com/showthr...&threadid=1108

FWIW,
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Old 03-11-2005, 13:39   #6
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Thanks

Fantastic advise guys, thanks. 'Stick' will be pulled.
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Old 03-11-2005, 14:01   #7
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and while you are at it, i am adding a spare halyard specifically for hoisting up mast and as a spare in case i screw up. shieves are already there so it is an easy and cheap upgrade. if you are going far, you should take the opportunity to add back-up. there are others here who know much more about what to put on the list. you may want to take advantage of their ideas.

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Old 03-11-2005, 16:05   #8
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If you're planning on a distance passage, definitely pull the stick AND the chainplates AND the chainplate attachment bolts. Replace ANYTHING thats older than 5-6 years of age and do a dye penetrant (magnaflux) exam of all newer components. Dye penetrant will help to uncover any fatigue cracks that are developing.

Versus fatigue failure, rigging terminals and base components only last 'about 1 million load cycles' or about the distance of ONE circumnavigation. .... then fatigue (rather than ductile) failure is the usual 'end of service life'. These are approximate values for boats of intended 'blue water' capability, if a 'coastal design' then the accumulated load cycles before failure is about 30% less.

If you replace chainplates, be sure that they are SMOOTH (no sharp edges, no welding) and are then polished to a 'brilliant mirror surface quality'. Also consider to 'beef up' any chainplate replacement for extra factor of safety. Ditto cranse collars, stem attachment fittings, etc. .... anything that attaches the standing rigging.
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Old 25-11-2005, 05:37   #9
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Yes pulling the stick is important before a big voyage. Halyards, all hardware, mast wiring and of course standing rigging should be inspected, changed as needed. BE brutal, if there is ANY doubt replace worn stuff.
We replaced all our standing rigging this year, including turnbuckles. That is count em 12 turnbuckles, also replaced lifelines. This is job we were able to do ourselves, which saved us some money, but is not for the faint of heart, it takes careful measuring, fitting etc and of course time. Also the correct tools, we are lucky there is someone who will loan us the appropriate tools. This is the second boat we have done this with.
Running rigging, beware, we bought some line from a manufacturer who lays up special twisted rigging line once a year. We will not ever purchase from this supplier again, fair better to pay more, and get a superior product. We use twisted because we have a traditional style boat and prefer line that is in keeping with that. Having said that, it is made from modern materials, not hemp. we are not interested in repairing line every few days.
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