Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 04-03-2013, 08:30   #16
rlg
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 58
Re: So how do you think they did this?

For sure they made a mistake...
I replaced shaft and cutlass bearing at playboy marine in fla. The guy who pressed off the old one was Dani, took him 15 minutes. Im pretty sure your boat and mine are the same and its possible if yours is a sloop. I would seek out a pro, its much easier , faster...
good luck
__________________

__________________
rlg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 08:32   #17
Moderator
 
Hudson Force's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Lived aboard & cruised for 45 years,- now on a chair in my walk-in closet.
Boat: Morgan OI 413 1973 - Aythya
Posts: 7,894
Images: 1
Re: So how do you think they did this?

Quote:
Originally Posted by rlg View Post
On my boat, you press out the cutlass bearing to give enough wiggle room to pull the shaft without removing the rudder.
'seems like this would do for putting the new shaft in,- I assume you wouldn't want to attempt any salvaging of this shaft. I certainly would not. Your photo doesn't show the configuration around your prop area. Is there a strut or skeg?
__________________

__________________
Take care and joy, Aythya crew
Hudson Force is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 08:37   #18
rlg
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 58
Re: So how do you think they did this?

Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptForce View Post
'seems like this would do for putting the new shaft in,- I assume you wouldn't want to attempt any salvaging of this shaft. I certainly would not. Your photo doesn't show the configuration around your prop area. Is there a strut or skeg?
This is correct. I was mistaken, I had to cut off my old,bent bronze shaft and slid in a new stainless one.
I also assumed you would install a new shaft
If you are not replacing your shaft, you will have to drop the rudder.
__________________
rlg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 08:44   #19
tsl
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Lake Mills, WI
Boat: O'Day 39
Posts: 159
Re: So how do you think they did this?

Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptForce View Post
'seems like this would do for putting the new shaft in,- I assume you wouldn't want to attempt any salvaging of this shaft. I certainly would not. Your photo doesn't show the configuration around your prop area. Is there a strut or skeg?
I think I'll return the favor and give the Marina the shaft. The boat has a strut. I hope they did not bend it.
__________________
tsl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2013, 10:52   #20
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 134
Re: So how do you think they did this?

I have seen something similiar several years ago. Don't know if this was the situation.

To remove the cutlass bearing out of the strut with the shaft left in place, the prop needs to be removed as someone stated before. This will allow removing and installing the cutlass bearing over the end where the prop was. If using a puller to remove the prop, the forces are applied between the back side of the prop hub and the end of the shaft with a protective nut on the threads used. Usally with a little strain on the puller and a little heat on the prop hub, the prop "pops" off the tappered shaft. The forces (compression) are only applied between the fit of the prop and shaft end.

If for some reason someone tried to outright yank or hammering the prop off, the high impact forces are from the back side of the prop down to and where it is connected, transmission? (not where you want it) The normal weakest point on the total shaft in tension will be at a high stress point or threads.

Where I seen this before the owner tried hammering the prop off hitting on the back side of the prop hub. He thought by using a 2x4 between the prop and hammer would help. The result is very similiar to your picture.

You may want to find out how they tried to remove the prop. If hammering the prop off you may want to consider someone look at your output bearings in the transmission if coupled directly. If there was enough force to crack the shaft there may be enough force to damage the bearings causing future issues.

Good Luck!
__________________
gulfstar37 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2013, 13:09   #21
tsl
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Lake Mills, WI
Boat: O'Day 39
Posts: 159
Re: So how do you think they did this?

Quote:
Originally Posted by gulfstar37 View Post
I have seen something similiar several years ago. Don't know if this was the situation.

To remove the cutlass bearing out of the strut with the shaft left in place, the prop needs to be removed as someone stated before. This will allow removing and installing the cutlass bearing over the end where the prop was. If using a puller to remove the prop, the forces are applied between the back side of the prop hub and the end of the shaft with a protective nut on the threads used. Usally with a little strain on the puller and a little heat on the prop hub, the prop "pops" off the tappered shaft. The forces (compression) are only applied between the fit of the prop and shaft end.

If for some reason someone tried to outright yank or hammering the prop off, the high impact forces are from the back side of the prop down to and where it is connected, transmission? (not where you want it) The normal weakest point on the total shaft in tension will be at a high stress point or threads.

Where I seen this before the owner tried hammering the prop off hitting on the back side of the prop hub. He thought by using a 2x4 between the prop and hammer would help. The result is very similiar to your picture.

You may want to find out how they tried to remove the prop. If hammering the prop off you may want to consider someone look at your output bearings in the transmission if coupled directly. If there was enough force to crack the shaft there may be enough force to damage the bearings causing future issues.

Good Luck!
Gulfstar37,
You are right on the money. I just got through talking to the marina. They came clean. It was exactly as you said .They were trying to get the prop off.
Since they had hardly begun the repair, the manager decided it was over his crew's head. They will take the mast down haul the boat 30 miles north to a full service yard where they will drop the rudder and replace the bronze shaft with a stainless. I'll pay to have the cutlass bearing replaced and the dripless seal installed and miss a few weeks of sailing on Lake Michigan in MAY which I am fine with.
I'm now a fan of this marina.

Thanks all for the help.

Happy sailing!!!
__________________
tsl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-03-2013, 13:22   #22
suz
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1
Re: So how do you think they did this?

Hi, I know nothing about the problem, but wonder what you think about the ODay 39. There is one here for sale on a lake and I am wondering if it would be suitable for the Gulf or even the ocean at some point.
__________________
suz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-03-2013, 13:42   #23
tsl
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Lake Mills, WI
Boat: O'Day 39
Posts: 159
Re: So how do you think they did this?

Quote:
Originally Posted by suz View Post
Hi, I know nothing about the problem, but wonder what you think about the ODay 39. There is one here for sale on a lake and I am wondering if it would be suitable for the Gulf or even the ocean at some point.
I consider them equal to Hunters, Catalinas, and of course Jeanneau who designed it, I consider them all coastal cruisers but plenty have crossed the ocean. Mine has made many trips to/from MD and the Caribbean via the outside.

It's a very cost effective boat. $60,000 for mint with electronics galore. $30,000 for a project. Be careful with the O'day 40. It has a cored hull.
__________________
tsl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-03-2013, 14:18   #24
Registered User
 
Group9's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,599
Images: 7
Re: So how do you think they did this?

I had a yard pick up my 32 foot inboard cruiser, and accidently put the straps across both shafts, bending both of them. And, then they tried like hell to tell me they were like when they got there (you couldn't even put them in gear for more than a minute, they would shake the whole boat so badly).

There are three kinds of liars. Liars, damn liars, and boatyards.
__________________
Group9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-03-2013, 08:59   #25
tsl
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Lake Mills, WI
Boat: O'Day 39
Posts: 159
Re: So how do you think they did this?

Quote:
Originally Posted by tsl View Post
I consider them equal to Hunters, Catalinas, and of course Jeanneau who designed it, I consider them all coastal cruisers but plenty have crossed the ocean. Mine has made many trips to/from MD and the Caribbean via the outside.

It's a very cost effective boat. $60,000 for mint with electronics galore. $30,000 for a project. Be careful with the O'day 40. It has a cored hull.
I need to rephrase this. It did not read as I intended it to.
I did not mean to imply that the O'day 40 was inferior to the 39. Most feel the 40 has a better interior and the extra foot allows for a sugar scoop transom. 40's sell for 10 to 20% more than 39's . My warning is about the 40's cored hull. Buyers should check the hull for delamination. Most all of them have some. Not the end of the world if the boat has some, it's just something particular to this model that must be considered.
__________________

__________________
tsl is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 14:20.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.