Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 13-02-2009, 22:47   #1
Registered User
 
Extemporaneous's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Canada
Boat: Corbin 39 Special Edition
Posts: 909
Sloping the Bilge?

I want to buildup my bilge a bit so the slope is a little more aggresive toward the sump. It is vinyl ester fiberglass and I figure that at one end the buildup would be about 1.5 inches. To do this with epoxy would be expensive. Is there any other product or maybe the question should be what is the right product to do this.

Any Ideas?

Thanks,
Extemp.
__________________

__________________
Extemporaneous is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13-02-2009, 23:52   #2
Registered User
 
James S's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Yemen & Lebanon... the sailboat is in Lebenon, the dhow is in Yemen
Boat: 1978 CT48 & 65ft Cargo Dhow
Posts: 5,816
Images: 139
How wide...how long?

My first thought would be to use a core filler like a pieces of HD foam shaped to give the tapper you're looking for, Or maybe that "Starboard" stuff I here some members talk about....even wood!
Then a couple layers of glass on top.

This is probably going to mean grinding into the sides of the existing bilge finish and will be messy to say the least.

I did a similar build up but only needed about half the height you’re looking at and was about 2ft square…I just used filler from resin/micro-balloons with no glass on top…it’s a lot easier if you can reduce your volume.
__________________

__________________
James
S/V Arctic Lady
I love my boat, I can't afford not to!
James S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-02-2009, 01:38   #3
Registered User
 
Viking Sailor's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: Fantasia 35 - s/v Feeling Good
Posts: 1,074
Extemp,

Are you sure the boat needs a sloping bilge? Rarely does a boat sit level in the water. They also rock and roll when the winds blow, power boats go by at high speed, and the crew moves about - even when tied to the dock. The trick is to use this natural sloshing about of the bilge water to catch it in a sump and then to pump it out.

__________________
Viking Sailor is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 14-02-2009, 09:30   #4
Registered User
 
Extemporaneous's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Canada
Boat: Corbin 39 Special Edition
Posts: 909
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viking Sailor View Post
Extemp,
Are you sure the boat needs a sloping bilge? Rarely does a boat sit level in the water. They also rock and roll when the winds blow, power boats go by at high speed, and the crew moves about - even when tied to the dock. The trick is to use this natural sloshing about of the bilge water to catch it in a sump and then to pump it out.
Actually, you make a good point. However, I think I do need to slope a bit more than it is and will have to fill some small pits and low spots.
Glad you said that though.

Thanks,
Extemp.
__________________
Extemporaneous is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-02-2009, 09:49   #5
Moderator Emeritus
 
David M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: research vessel
Posts: 10,152
How about building a well the bilge pump sits in? As water gets sloshed around it accumulates in the well where it is captured and contained. It is then an easy matter for the bilge pump to empty the well.
__________________
David

Life begins where land ends.
David M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-02-2009, 10:15   #6
Registered User
 
Extemporaneous's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Canada
Boat: Corbin 39 Special Edition
Posts: 909
Quote:
Originally Posted by David M View Post
How about building a well the bilge pump sits in? As water gets sloshed around it accumulates in the well where it is captured and contained. It is then an easy matter for the bilge pump to empty the well.
Thanks David.
I indeed have a well or sump, I'm just not happy with some of the standing water (not that much really) on the bilge bottom along the path to the well.
I think Viking Sailor had a good point about the sloshing and now I just want to make it all smooth (with some slight buildup) and be sure what I install to smooth/sloop/buildup that path will not delaminate or get water trapped between the old and new. If I use epoxy it could get expensive (path approx 12" x 7') and was wondering if there was an alternate material that would be acceptable and less expensive?
I may be stuck with epoxy from what I've read.

Extemp.
__________________
Extemporaneous is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-02-2009, 10:17   #7
sitting on the dock of the bay

Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 1,513
Images: 6
Send a message via Yahoo to gonesail
couldn't you use some kind of foam core covered with epoxy? seems easy enough if you need to do it.
__________________
gonesail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-02-2009, 10:28   #8
Registered User
 
Extemporaneous's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Canada
Boat: Corbin 39 Special Edition
Posts: 909
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonesail View Post
couldn't you use some kind of foam core covered with epoxy? seems easy enough if you need to do it.
You may be right but that would still mean that the low spots below any flat material (foam core) would have to be filled.
My question is a little preemptive as I only have about half of the bilge in question opened up. I still need to remove 100 gals of diesel from my main tank and remove the tank.
We'll see.

Thanks,
Extemp.
__________________
Extemporaneous is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-02-2009, 10:34   #9
Moderator Emeritus
 
David M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: research vessel
Posts: 10,152
I think epoxy is your best bet with its strength, ability to adhere and water tight properties. Instead of using pure epoxy, which would run, mix the epoxy with microballoon until you get the paste or filler like viscosity that you prefer. Adding microballoon also makes it lighter and easier to sand smooth. You could then paint or roll on a layer of epoxy over that to make it easier to clean. I would use something like Interlux 3000 which is a white colored epoxy meant to be a water barrier and is a very tough epoxy when cured.

I think that if you were to use foam that you may be opening yourself up to possible delamination or water absorption problems later.
__________________
David

Life begins where land ends.
David M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-02-2009, 11:29   #10
Registered User
 
Extemporaneous's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Canada
Boat: Corbin 39 Special Edition
Posts: 909
Thanks David.
Quote:
Originally Posted by David M View Post
I think epoxy is your best bet with its strength, ability to adhere and water tight properties. Instead of using pure epoxy, which would run, mix the epoxy with microballoon until you get the paste or filler like viscosity that you prefer. Adding microballoon also makes it lighter and easier to sand smooth. You could then paint or roll on a layer of epoxy over that to make it easier to clean. I would use something like Interlux 3000 which is a white colored epoxy meant to be a water barrier and is a very tough epoxy when cured.
I think this is right for my situation.
Regarding the paint, I am currently preping the interior of my hull (parts at a time) and was planning to use AwlGard. It is less offensive (water based) for interior work. "Like all urethanes, is not to be subjected to extended water immersion" however I'm hoping to have no standing water when I'm done. "This two component urethane has excellent solvent resistance to denatured alcohol and acetone as well as diesel fuel and anti-freeze."
Will this paint work or do you maintain that I should use the Interlux 3000 for the actual bilge portion of the painting project?

Quote:
Originally Posted by David M View Post
I think that if you were to use foam that you may be opening yourself up to possible delamination or water absorption problems later.
This is what my farmer sense was telling me also.

Thanks all,
Extemp.
__________________
Extemporaneous is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-02-2009, 20:16   #11
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Corpus Christi Texas
Boat: boatless atm
Posts: 723
Send a message via MSN to bobfnbw
Extemp I today coated my bilge with bilgekote.

Interlux Bilgekote Paint

Went on easy. Nice white color. Cost was reasonable.
Far are pumping out your 100 gal. of diesel, I used a electric pump thru my twin racor 500's and into a racor baja filter into a 19 gal. moller poly day tank and 6 secpter 5 gal tanks. There was only a bit left after that. I had planned to sell my fuel to the local shrimpers if there was more but just squeaked by.
The crap that I found at the bottom of my aluminum tank was increadible. So glad I pulled it out.
__________________
bobfnbw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-02-2009, 20:22   #12
Senior Cruiser
 
DeepFrz's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Winnipeg
Boat: None at this time
Posts: 7,930
Bob, did you take pictures of the gunk in your tank? It would be great if you could post pictures of the stuff here or the "Fuel Polishing" thread. Thanks
__________________
The Blue Dot Campaign. This Changes Everything.
DeepFrz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-02-2009, 13:10   #13
Registered User
 
Extemporaneous's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Canada
Boat: Corbin 39 Special Edition
Posts: 909
Interlux Bilgekote Paint vs AwlGard in the Bilge

This project is a BIG deal due to the removal of most of my Interior and the extensive preparation required. I ONLY want to do this ONCE as I'm sure you can all appreciate.
Does anyone have an opinion of which of the two paints above is the BEST?
I am already compromising due to this being done within an enclosed area and therefore I believe that picking the RIGHT paint is even more important. A lot of these areas will be covered and NOT accessible again.
Below are links to the two different paints for those that may be able to interpret the data better than myself.

yachtpaint.com - the official site of International and Interlux paints (it's java based? so you have to go to Bilgekote once you get there)
Awl-Gard

Anyone?

Thanks,
Extemp.
__________________
Extemporaneous is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-02-2009, 13:16   #14
Registered User
 
Extemporaneous's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Canada
Boat: Corbin 39 Special Edition
Posts: 909
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobfnbw View Post
Extemp I today coated my bilge with bilgekote.

Interlux Bilgekote Paint

Went on easy. Nice white color. Cost was reasonable.
Far are pumping out your 100 gal. of diesel, I used a electric pump thru my twin racor 500's and into a racor baja filter into a 19 gal. moller poly day tank and 6 secpter 5 gal tanks. There was only a bit left after that. I had planned to sell my fuel to the local shrimpers if there was more but just squeaked by.
The crap that I found at the bottom of my aluminum tank was increadible. So glad I pulled it out.
Thanks Bob,
I'm just getting my polishing system setup and will likely use it to empty my tanks. Now I just have to find someone who wants it (and is willing to pay something for it).

Did you look into the AwlGard?

Extemp.
__________________
Extemporaneous is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-02-2009, 16:07   #15
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Buena Vista Colorado
Boat: S/V Pooka Com-Pac 27
Posts: 212
I just did this on a much smaller scale. My boat is a Com-pac 27. The ballast is concrete. The bilge is made by placing a plywood form in the keel and the concrete is poured around it. The whole thing is then glassed over. Over the years water made it's way into the plywood and it was rotting out. I tore out the old bilge and plywood form which left me with an issue, rebuilding the bilge with the proper slope. Since the surface I was working on was laready concrete I used grout, sand/cement mix and built a very smooth and well sloped bilge. Then the whole thing got reglassed with epoxy resin. The majority of the shape was very cheap and easy to work. If it should encounter water intrusion it wont rot, rust or delaminate. It'll just be damp concrete. On top of the e-glass it got two coats of bilgekote.

For your project why wouldn't something like that work? You can even get admixs for the grout that make it bind to most anything, however a little flex might be a good thing.

check out this resource, they have some pretty exotic material.
http://www.foxind.com/
__________________

__________________
S/V Pooka
Com-Pac 27
bmiller is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
bilge

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Water in the Bilge Charlie Construction, Maintenance & Refit 11 05-12-2008 08:10
BILGE KEELS joeysranger Monohull Sailboats 3 12-09-2008 10:49
Stinky bilge mestrezat Construction, Maintenance & Refit 2 09-05-2008 14:16
So what do you store in your bilge? Colorado Dreamer General Sailing Forum 15 04-05-2008 06:30
Bilge pumps bcguy Plumbing Systems and Fixtures 15 22-07-2006 13:46



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:01.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.