Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 3 votes, 5.00 average. Display Modes
Old 28-03-2009, 07:28   #16
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Cruising
Boat: Jeanneau 38 Gin Fizz- Rhosyn Mor
Posts: 331
well... I had heard that ABS had no UV protection. This was my thinking.
1. at the cost and time (117 and 2-3 hours) if it lasts 5 years, I am a happy guy
2. Can always paint the stuff, Automotive paint works well on ABS, ( Perhaps a spray painted Madonna and Child, of course then I would have to have a stainless chain link steering wheel, and a hula girl on the transom)
__________________

__________________
Rhosyn Mor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-03-2009, 07:43   #17
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Nevada City. CA
Boat: Sceptre 41
Posts: 3,745
Images: 9
Sounds like a good idea RM:

If you paint the ABS it should laast a good long time. I don't know where you will hang your fuzzy dice as most boats don't have rearview mirrors.
__________________

__________________
Fair Winds,

Charlie

Between us there was, as I have already said somewhere, the bond of the sea. Besides holding our hearts together through long periods of separation, it had the effect of making us tolerant of each other's yarns -- and even convictions. Heart of Darkness
Joseph Conrad
Charlie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-03-2009, 07:49   #18
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,573
Images: 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhosyn Mor View Post
well... I had heard that ABS had no UV protection. This was my thinking.
1. at the cost and time (117 and 2-3 hours) if it lasts 5 years, I am a happy guy
2. Can always paint the stuff, Automotive paint works well on ABS, ( Perhaps a spray painted Madonna and Child, of course then I would have to have a stainless chain link steering wheel, and a hula girl on the transom)
Or use PVC pipe.
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-03-2009, 08:41   #19
Registered User
 
neelie's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: On the boat
Boat: Valiant 50
Posts: 514
I guess at $117 and only 3 hours to fabricate, if it only lasts a couple of years it probably still makes economic sense. The only question remaining is the rate of deterioration due to UV.
__________________
The light at the end of the tunnel are no longer the headlights of the oncoming train......yippee
neelie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-03-2009, 09:45   #20
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,156
Hey RM.... interesting solution, especially given your cost and time invested.

How strong do you expect it to be... Will you be able to stand on it? A hard dodger for me will have to be strong enough to take my (substantial) weight in order to allow me to get to the boom to put my mainsail away.
__________________
speedoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-03-2009, 13:19   #21
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Nevada City. CA
Boat: Sceptre 41
Posts: 3,745
Images: 9
Here is a link to the tap plastic site. The offer a product called ultra white PVC. I called them and they quoted me a cost of $242. To me this seemed like a good deal since I would want to get quite a few years.

The question of strength to stand on whatever you put up there is going to depend on the support posts and the span between rafters. I have a cloth dodger now and I can't stand on it but I can lean over it to get to my mainsail.
__________________
Fair Winds,

Charlie

Between us there was, as I have already said somewhere, the bond of the sea. Besides holding our hearts together through long periods of separation, it had the effect of making us tolerant of each other's yarns -- and even convictions. Heart of Darkness
Joseph Conrad
Charlie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-03-2009, 13:26   #22
Registered User
 
captjohn360's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: chicago il
Boat: fp athena 38 ..10 10
Posts: 171
Images: 7
charlie wheres the link....jt
__________________
captjohn360
captjohn360 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2009, 19:11   #23
Registered User
 
Extemporaneous's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Canada
Boat: Corbin 39 Special Edition
Posts: 909
If it is that easy to form, how do you think it would work it you laminated it with fiberglass once you've got the shape you want. It would become the core material. Like a non removable plug.

What do you think?

Extemp.
__________________
Extemporaneous is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2009, 22:56   #24
DoÖ or do not
 
s/v Jedi's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: in paradise
Boat: Sundeer 64
Posts: 9,198
If I would have that nicely formed piece of ABS, I would have waxed it already with the first couple of layers glass and epoxy on it ;-) Seriously, you did 50% of the work for a fibreglass top here.

cheers,
Nick.
__________________
s/v Jedi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2009, 11:49   #25
Sponsoring Vendor

Community Sponsor
Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Milton, Ontario
Boat: still dreaming...getting close...
Posts: 192
fiberglass sheet

There is a fiberglass product that is about 1/8" thick and comes in a big roll 50" wide. We use it to cover our hardtops and hard dodger designs.

Its easy to work with; can be cut with heavy duty shears (basically big scissors), is completely waterproof and UV resistant and is very light. It can also be easily drilled for attachment point at the edges. The frame is constructed out of 1.90" anodized aluminum, basically the industry standard for hardtops, t-tops and dodgers.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	hardtop sideview (2000 x 1500).jpg
Views:	387
Size:	484.0 KB
ID:	7687  
__________________
Atkins & Hoyle Ltd. Over 40 years of Marine Innovation, Quality and Craftsmanship
Davits, Hatches, Ports, Hatch Repairs, Motor Lifts, Arches/Hardtops and Custom Designs www.AtkinsHoyle.com |atkinshoyle@dapa.com
Benjamaphone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2009, 12:19   #26
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: - San Diego and Fort Collins, CO
Boat: 38' Homebuilt Cutter - "Atticus"
Posts: 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by waterdog View Post
I did a hard dodger on my last boat. 3 layers laminated 1/4" ply with epoxy glass over top. Windows were removable acrylic. It was a great upgrade to the boat. I would do one again.
Very cool waterdog. I am thinking of doing this same thing on our boat. Did you document your construction on a blog or here on the forums somewhere?
__________________
Colorado Dreamer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2009, 14:44   #27
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 96
Colorado,

I didn't document it. This is a little different than some of the hard skin on frames described in this thread. This version of a hard dodger you can jump up and down on.

First step was matching the overall curve of the cabin top. I used a straight edge and measured the rise of the arch eg. 4" over six feet or whatever. Then I used a wood batten to replicate the same curve onto plywood forms. Run the batten over three nails and you get a fair curve which is pleasing to the eye.

Then I nailed the first sheet of plywood to the form with finish nails. I spread epoxy on it and screwed the second sheet onto the first. Let cure. Remove the screws and spread more epoxy on and screw on sheet 3. Let cure, pop off the forms, and pull the finish nails out the underside.

I cut to shape rounding corners and whatnot so it looks shippy and no hips get snagged exiting the cockpit. I put half round wood strips front and back for drip rails and to give an edge to grab on. Covered with a layer of glass and several coats of epoxy.

The sides are 3/4 plywood. The slopes match the sides of the cabin top. I started with cardboard. Then cut 1/4" inch ply from the carboard templates and finally did the final pieces out of 3/4" plywood. The sides are scribed to the dodger top and the cabin top to give a perfect fit.

I recessed dados for the lexan windows to fit in. They were held by clips that could twist out for easy removal of the windows.

Underneath, If fitted it out with LED dome light, integrated storage for the window inserts, and a little chart slot. On top, grabrails and some criss crossing bungies to hold down whatever.

On, my new boat I installed a canvas dodger with grabrails. Nice unit, but I really wish I had taken the time to build another rigid dodger. Much more versatile.
__________________
waterdog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2009, 10:42   #28
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: - San Diego and Fort Collins, CO
Boat: 38' Homebuilt Cutter - "Atticus"
Posts: 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by waterdog View Post
Colorado,

I didn't document it. This is a little different than some of the hard skin on frames described in this thread. This version of a hard dodger you can jump up and down on.

First step was matching the overall curve of the cabin top. I used a straight edge and measured the rise of the arch eg. 4" over six feet or whatever. Then I used a wood batten to replicate the same curve onto plywood forms. Run the batten over three nails and you get a fair curve which is pleasing to the eye.

Then I nailed the first sheet of plywood to the form with finish nails. I spread epoxy on it and screwed the second sheet onto the first. Let cure. Remove the screws and spread more epoxy on and screw on sheet 3. Let cure, pop off the forms, and pull the finish nails out the underside.

I cut to shape rounding corners and whatnot so it looks shippy and no hips get snagged exiting the cockpit. I put half round wood strips front and back for drip rails and to give an edge to grab on. Covered with a layer of glass and several coats of epoxy.

The sides are 3/4 plywood. The slopes match the sides of the cabin top. I started with cardboard. Then cut 1/4" inch ply from the carboard templates and finally did the final pieces out of 3/4" plywood. The sides are scribed to the dodger top and the cabin top to give a perfect fit.

I recessed dados for the lexan windows to fit in. They were held by clips that could twist out for easy removal of the windows.

Underneath, If fitted it out with LED dome light, integrated storage for the window inserts, and a little chart slot. On top, grabrails and some criss crossing bungies to hold down whatever.

On, my new boat I installed a canvas dodger with grabrails. Nice unit, but I really wish I had taken the time to build another rigid dodger. Much more versatile.
I think this will be my summer project. It sounds like the way you built yours is along the lines of how I planned to do mine. Thank you for the post.
__________________
Colorado Dreamer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2009, 10:47   #29
Senior Cruiser
 
sandy daugherty's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: near Annapolis
Boat: PDQ 36 & Atlantic 42
Posts: 1,178
Gord: what happens to exposed ABS? Will it chalk out, or sag in the heat?
__________________
sandy daugherty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2009, 11:42   #30
Senior Cruiser
 
nautical62's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Live Iowa - Sail mostly Bahamas
Boat: Beneteau 32.5
Posts: 2,264
Images: 12
Just a couple more thoughts on ABS:

It is the material of choice for quality plastic canoes. However in support of what GordMay said I find the life of these canoes to be pathetically short if kept outside: Less than 10 years. For comparison, I know of aluminum canoes that are 50 years old and should be good for another 50. I imagine an ABS hard top, sailed in the lower lattitudes would degrade from UV even faster, though one might be able to live with a degarding hard top a bit longer as well.

Sandy, I can't speak for Gord, but my experience with ABS outside, is it first fades, then gets chalky, then begins to get more brittle and also begins to physically degrade: Cracking, pitting, etc at which time it is also much more prone to catastrophic failure.

Often one must decide between ease of construction & cost versus longevity. When weighing this, the scales may tip differently for different people.

Considering the UV tolerence is something to think about when purchasing sit on top kayaks, etc as tenders which may be stored on deck as well.
__________________

__________________
nautical62 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
dodger

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
hard dodger final fit. Rhosyn Mor Construction, Maintenance & Refit 4 04-04-2009 12:48
Hard Dodger Celestialsailor Construction, Maintenance & Refit 37 19-10-2008 20:59
Hard Dodger Designs Da BigBamboo Construction, Maintenance & Refit 16 11-12-2006 18:37
Dodger replacment / building Jack Tar Construction, Maintenance & Refit 5 26-01-2004 21:44
Hard Dodger Skylark Monohull Sailboats 5 19-05-2003 14:08



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:09.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.