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Old 14-03-2010, 16:37   #1
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Rotten Deck & Cabin...

I have come across a '69 Mariner 31 Ketch... It is in good shape except for "repairs needed" on the deck and cabin. The wood is rotten out.

I have not seen the boat yet, but from what I hear these boats are notorious for having rot issues on deck.

If all else is well on the boat and the rot is the only real problem, I think I might go for it as these have a reputation for being good sturdy boats and I can get it for well under $10k.

So my question is, the cost to repair/replace sections of rotten plywood... I know that it is a complete unknown until you get into it and see what the extent is, but is the a general rule for the cost, like $x.xx per square foot? Or any way to estimate how much I might be looking at to have this fixed.

Im hoping that if it all works out, maybe I could have the damage repaired for $10k or so.

Let me know what you all think.

Thanks!
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Old 14-03-2010, 16:42   #2
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well to have a deck on a 50' Formosa of Hudson Force in mexico is about 30K from what I hear. I did mine for about $15K and did everything except the finish work, which I had a yard complete the final layers of rovern, cloth and paint....
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Old 14-03-2010, 16:42   #3
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are you doing the work youself?.... figure 3 grand by the time you paint,

are you paying someone to do it?... i hope you have deeeeep pockets
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Old 14-03-2010, 16:48   #4
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Run! Run fast!!
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Old 14-03-2010, 17:12   #5
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Unfortunately, I think delmrrey may have it right.

SAIL BOAT 31' MARINER KETCH 1969
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Old 14-03-2010, 18:51   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GordMay View Post
Unfortunately, I think delmrrey may have it right.

SAIL BOAT 31' MARINER KETCH 1969

That'd be the one...

I just talked with the owner and hes had it since the 90's mainly sailing in the Puget Sound area. I can assume that since hes had it so long and let the problem get as bad as it seems, I can imagine what else didnt get maintained...
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Old 14-03-2010, 19:26   #7
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Looks like a fiberglass (FRP/GRP) boat with lots of wood - it is also a pretty boat IMHO. In 1969 they often used plywood or end grain Balsa for a core for decks and cabin tops. Improperly bedded deck fittings allow moisture into the wood and after several (many) years it becomes the consistency of soil and the deck is what you would call spongy or springy.
These days there are different core materials that can be used. It would probably be cheaper to repair with plywood again but will only last as long as the original. It is a big job, make no mistake on that. It can be done from below but is much easier (for a DIY person) to do it from the top which means that sections of the outer skin will need to be cleanly cut and peeled away from the rotten core and perhaps even re-used. The difficult part is putting it all back together so it looks like nothing ever happened.
I have a 1967 Tartan 27' that was built using similar techniques but fortunately we have only on small soft spot on deck, so far. Several other T27 owners have undertaken this project and have posted some pictures of the process at our yahoo group: T27Owners.
If you are not going to do most of this yourself you can expect to pay and pay some more.
Most people would probably say run, and quickly but I think it is a sweet boat. The real problem is that once that is fixed it is still a 41 year old boat with a new deck/cabin that may last another 40 years.
Good luck however you choose.
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Old 14-03-2010, 19:38   #8
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It would cost time more than anything else if you were to do it yourself. A boat yard could charge double what you pay for the boat just to do the repair. Materials cost would be over a grand for sure, and that is if you cut out the old skin carefully and reused it. You better love fiberglass to do that though - lots of grinding. Be sure that that is all you are going to have to fix - I bought a boat with a shot rig, no sails and a dodgy engine thinking that those issues were about as bad as it could get. LOTS of fiberglass grindings later are testament to my naivety. Suspect everything structurally and be sure to survey it yourself until you are quite sure it is worth the money and time
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Old 14-03-2010, 19:51   #9
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She's a nice boat.

She is a nice boat and I think she deserves a loving owner. My boat is 40 years old, but I don't think the hull is going to wear out before me, unless I hit a reef or rocks, or leave it to rash to death against a concrete or steel pier...

Things to think about:

How many fittings need to be removed to do the repair?
Each fitting needs to be bolted through solid glass/epoxy, the core material should be completely sealed with epoxy, otherwise water will enter the core through your bolt holes.
Do the fittings have backing plates?
How many gallons of epoxy are you going to need to buy?
What will you use as core and how much will you need?
How will you finish it?
Do you have the skills?
Can the work be done in the water or will she be in the yard?
Can you keep it in your backyard or will it be at the boatyard?
Will you have to step both masts?

Each of these questions will effect the cost.

For instance: my boat has a few small soft spots. They are small enough that I will be able to fix them with the boat in the water. Thankfully they are not near any fittings. I have the woodworking tools and skills. It will not take more than a half gallon of epoxy, some marine ply, a few stainless screws, and some dynel.

I can probably do my repair for $300 not including my time.

It is really a matter of scale, but the real killers are not the cost of materials, it's the time, and the logistics.

If you have to haul the boat in a yard, unstep the masts, pay someone to do all the work. Then it will be thousands upon thousands.

If you can do it in your slip, without the help of professionals, then it will only be the cost of materials and tools, which entirely depends upon how much of the core is rotten.
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Old 14-03-2010, 19:54   #10
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Im going to look at it since its so close...

But I think that I will pass on it. After finding out how long they had the boat and let this problem grow to what it is now 15yrs on. I am envisioning other maintenance-preventable issues. I will have a look at it and see what I can see, I may spring for a survey, but its unlikely that I will pursue this one.
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Old 14-03-2010, 22:11   #11
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How old are you?

For someone in their 30's or even early 40's, it would make a great project boat. But it will rob you of time and money for some time unless you have lots of $$$$ to throw at it. So How is the hull???

When I was younger I always wanted to build a boat. Now that I have restored and upgraded a 30 YO boat, I basically have, but I'd never do it again unless I didn't have to work and had the money up front.
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Old 14-03-2010, 22:19   #12
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Sh/sh,

From memory, those Mariners didn't have plywood cored glass decks and houses, but simply ply structures with a glass overlay for "watertightness". Most of the above discussions relate to repair of a cored glass deck, which is a rather different affair.

I'd surely give this one a miss, no matter how nice you think the lines are!

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Old 14-03-2010, 22:56   #13
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I have to agree with Jim Cate, I have known others with similar era boats who started on a deck repairs and wound up with deck replacements.

It can be done, but you are talking a LOT of work plus tools unless you already own them.
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