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Old 09-12-2007, 06:21   #1
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Removal of 3M 5200

About a week ago used 5200 to attach and seal aux motor mount. Now find I need to remove. Any suggestions/past experience.

Thanks
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Old 09-12-2007, 06:53   #2
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Well, you are probably going to get a variety of responses. Funnily enough, people have almost the same fervor for their calk as they do for their anchor or religion.

I am assuming that enough time has passed for the 5200 to completely cure. In that case, to remove the mount I suggest using a thin blade to CUT the 5200. I have used mechanical means (scraper and wire brush) to clean off most of the old caulk. Then I have resorted to "better living through chemistry", having used a number of solvents to remove the final remnants. One popular choice is "anti-bond" sold in many marine stores (look for the red cap). Be careful about some solvents (such as MEK) which can soften gelcoat, paint, the inner surface of your lungs, etc....

Removing 5200 is a pain, but unlike many sailors, I LIKE 5200 (in its place). It's adhesive properties are fantastic.

However, if I anticipate the need to remove a piece of equipment, I usually use 3m 4200 (a polyurethane sealant with less adhesive properties than 5200).

One final thought for the DIY cruisers out there. To work with any nasty chemical, I have a mask with a filter for organic solvents. It cost only $20 and it filters out enough that I can't even smell some of the yucky things I have been working with. The one working brain cell I have left is very thankful!

Good Luck!

Mike
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Old 09-12-2007, 07:12   #3
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DeBond Corp. claims that it's DeBond Marine Formula will:
remove and clean up cured 3M 5200 (polyurethane adhesive sealant) in addition to silicones, caulk and common marine adhesives without damaging the boat or accessory.”
DeBond Corp.
Wellington, Fla.
Phone: (561) 575-4200
Marine Formula
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Old 09-12-2007, 10:36   #4
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Gord -

Previous owner used it to bed the flanges going through the teak decks down to the chainplates, so there's a 1" x 4" (x however deep.. maybe 1 1/2") "block" of the stuff on each flange.

I imagine it's going to go after my paint, and the teak caulking right?
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Old 09-12-2007, 11:57   #5
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After removing the fitting and scraping away the majority of the 5200, I have found that laquer thinner on a rag will remove the risidual thin film of 5200 from the fitting as well as fiberglass and metal decks. Don't know about teak.

Richard
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Old 09-12-2007, 13:06   #6
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Many Thanks

All good information. Thanks for the input.

Was hoping "out D spot" would work.

Now I know why Popeye has not elbows.
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Old 11-12-2007, 18:57   #7
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Breaking the bond without pulling up the substrate (Fiberglass?) is tough. I have sucessfully used a butane torch to heat a cheap butter knife and cut into the mating surfaces as much as you can. Then pull, wedge and curse.
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Old 12-12-2007, 08:04   #8
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The debond or heated tools are probably your best bets. But if you can get a Dremel or similar tool with a small bit, and drill/grind out as much of the stuff as possible, that's probably going to be worth buying a Dremel kit all by itself.

5200 is forever--except when it doesn't always bond to things, including stainless. Your 5200 is still relatively fresh, with some elbow grease and the debond (check the web site or read the label to see what else it affects) you should be able to get it off.
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Old 12-12-2007, 17:47   #9
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I'm certainly no expert, but...
If you carefully apply heat to the mounting point(s) of the aux engine mount the fitting will come off with the least ammount of effort and aggrivation. A heat gun is a better tool than a gas tourch and a hard wood wedge certainly helps break the bond of the 5200.
Kirk
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Old 13-03-2010, 15:35   #10
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use a thin blade reverse cut blade from home depot to break the bond-haven't figured a good way to remove the caulk
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Old 13-03-2010, 16:00   #11
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The PO loved 5200. Debond helped if it was a thin layer. If it was thick it wasn't much use. heated tools with a sharp blade helped, otherwise 60 or 80 grit paper and careful sanding was the only way I got it off
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Old 13-03-2010, 16:02   #12
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Debond is the ticket. David
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Old 13-03-2010, 19:30   #13
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great quote: "5200 is forever"

Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
The debond or heated tools are probably your best bets. But if you can get a Dremel or similar tool with a small bit, and drill/grind out as much of the stuff as possible, that's probably going to be worth buying a Dremel kit all by itself.

5200 is forever--except when it doesn't always bond to things, including stainless. Your 5200 is still relatively fresh, with some elbow grease and the debond (check the web site or read the label to see what else it affects) you should be able to get it off.
+1 on Dremel tool.
or dynamite. your choice.
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Old 14-03-2010, 06:35   #14
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I used 5200 to mount a radar pole to the stern of the boat. The stainless steel base was mounted to the teak cap rail with screws and the 5200. After about a year I needed to remove that pole and had limited time for doing so. After removing the screws I tried to insert a thin blade between the base and the wood, but could only get it partially inserted no matter how much I tried and pounded. I finally gave up and decided to just apply as much leverage to the pole as possible fully expecting that the teak cap rail would come out with it. It didn't and I was lucky to get a clean break with no damage what so ever. If I had more time I would have tried the heating route and possibly the chemical stuff.
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Old 26-11-2013, 12:14   #15
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Re: Removal of 3M 5200

DeBond does offer a patented formula for removing 3M-5200 adhesives. Remove 3M 5200 with ease using Debond Products.
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