Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 17-04-2010, 12:47   #1
Registered User
 
SvenG's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Mexico heading South
Boat: Ericson 39B - Senta II
Posts: 1,169
Refinishing Formica ?

The idea of ripping out and replacing the 33-year old Formica on the counter tops is a non-starter. The Formica is old and shows use as cutting boards, but it isn't worth ripping apart the cabinetry.

I assume it is impractical to somehow refinish the Formica in place ? Compounding it like gelcoat ? Painting it with some really hard finish ?

How about laying new Formica (?) on top of the old Formica and adding molding around the exposed edges, somehow matched to the existing molding ?

This is not a pressing project but I'd like to see if there are any ideas out there that might make it a reasonable task to take on ?

Thanks,


-Sven
__________________

__________________
Senta II - http://www.Grenander.com/Senta_II/Blog/Blog.html
1977 Ericson 39B -- Hull # 216
SvenG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-04-2010, 12:55   #2
Registered User
 
James S's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Yemen & Lebanon... the sailboat is in Lebenon, the dhow is in Yemen
Boat: 1978 CT48 & 65ft Cargo Dhow
Posts: 5,816
Images: 139
Boy thats a tough one Sven.
I've seen it painted, I cant recommend what that paint would be but I'm sure proper surface prep will be key....also don't know how long it would last...the one I saw was on a power boat that got limited weekend use and still looked OK after over a year.
If its just the top and no back splash or nosing, you may be able to remove it with heat with out tearing up your cabinets.
Have you got any pictures we could look at?
__________________

__________________
James
S/V Arctic Lady
I love my boat, I can't afford not to!
James S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-04-2010, 13:31   #3
Long Range Cruiser
 
MarkJ's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Australian living on "Sea Life" currently in England.
Boat: Beneteau 393 "Sea Life"
Posts: 12,828
Images: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by SvenG View Post
How about laying new Formica (?) on top of the old Formica and adding molding around the exposed edges, somehow matched to the existing molding ?
One of our best deals ever was when we were in Malaysia.
We found a laminates shop and saw some Formica ther for $60 per sheet. I asked the counter jumper who was the best tradesperson who buys laminates from them for kitchens. he gave me directions to this old guy.
he did out galley, laying formica over the top of the old, for $200 INCLUDING the sheet of formica.

Sensational job!!!!!!
__________________
Notes on a Circumnavigation.
OurLifeAtSea.com

Somalia Pirates and our Convoy
MarkJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-04-2010, 15:55   #4
Armchair Bucketeer
 
David_Old_Jersey's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 10,013
Images: 4
A well timed thread - am thinking of something similar myself, albeit simply as the colour is somewhat dated (bulkheads and cupboard facias as well as countertops) and am reluctant to start chopping away with a chisel.

Am thinking of drilling through the Formica so it looks like swiss cheese and then laying new formica (or maybe tiles on the worktop) over the top. Finishing / hiding the edges maybe in wood.

But am interested in any other ideas..............
David_Old_Jersey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-04-2010, 16:05   #5
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,413
The problem is fitting it. If you can make a perfect template which will come tight to the fiddles and bulkheads you can glue a new sheet over the old - sand and rough up the old one and degrease it.

Remove sinks with lips which lay over the formica and use a router with a follow bit to trim out the new opening.

Use thick formica and get your template to be exact and the use files and sand paper to trim the pieces to fit.

It will take some time, but be as good as new and maybe less work that pulling the top off if that is even possible.

You can also use 1/4" solid surface as the new top - same process - more costly material.
__________________
Sandero is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-04-2010, 16:05   #6
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Port Ludlow Wa
Boat: Makela,Ingrid38,Idora
Posts: 1,974
David- The drilling is a good idea. When beer is spilled it simplify the mopping up. I have the same need to update/fix. I will observe the suggestions here with interest.

Todd
__________________
IdoraKeeper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-04-2010, 16:06   #7
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Boat: Cape Dory 33, 17' Boston Whaler
Posts: 164
It might be worth just asking the guys at Home Depot or Lowes as they all sell sheets of formica. If they sell the sheets, it stands to reason that they sell some type of adhesive as well. I'm willing to bet that the key to this project is to make good templates out of posterboard or luan and once they fit perfectly, transfer them to the new sheet of formica. 90% prep work just like always...
__________________
Prerequisite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-04-2010, 16:30   #8
Registered User
 
JiffyLube's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Oceanside, Ca.
Boat: Islander Freeport 36
Posts: 567
Images: 8
You can glue new over old, but the problem is where you can see the edges of the Formica. If seeing two layers around the edges doesn't bother you, then that's they easy way to go. If your fiddles go around the parameter of the counter, that's even better because it will hide that edges of the Formica. Remove the fiddles (deck mounted or side mounted), sink, and anything else that's in the way. Make a template out of cardboard or some other stiff material, and transfer that to the Formica. Cut sheets to fit (a little over hang is OK), and trim edges with a router using the appropriate bit (I'm not sure what tool is used to cut straight runs). Do a dry lay before committing to glue. Drill out new holes in the deck for deck mounted fiddles, and reset fiddles, sink, and anything else that was removed. If you haven't done this before plan on extra Formica in case you blow a piece, and take your time getting the new piece to fit.
__________________
JiffyLube is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-04-2010, 18:14   #9
Armchair Bucketeer
 
David_Old_Jersey's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 10,013
Images: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by IdoraKeeper View Post
David- The drilling is a good idea. When beer is spilled it simplify the mopping up.
LoL! not intending to drill all the way through - but I've said that before
David_Old_Jersey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-04-2010, 19:06   #10
Registered User
 
SvenG's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Mexico heading South
Boat: Ericson 39B - Senta II
Posts: 1,169
Quote:
Originally Posted by David_Old_Jersey View Post
LoL! not intending to drill all the way through - but I've said that before
Good idea. If you drilled all the way through the beer would drain into the bilge and become almost undrinkable !


-Sven
__________________
Senta II - http://www.Grenander.com/Senta_II/Blog/Blog.html
1977 Ericson 39B -- Hull # 216
SvenG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-04-2010, 22:00   #11
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Fort Pierce, FL. Texas Roots
Boat: 82 Present, 13 ft dinghy
Posts: 492
SvenG is correct, sand it (old) fit your new, a laminate cutter and/or joiner will come in handy. After you have a fitment you are happy then regular contact cement used as directed wiill do the trick. Just scab over the old.
I did this in my kitchen.
__________________
'Da Mule
Mule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-04-2010, 11:44   #12
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Columbia, SC
Boat: 1991 Privilege 39"
Posts: 15
Hi,

Has anyone used High Density Polyethlene to replace formica? I saw some pretty stuff today when I picked up my plastic for my hatches. It is made by Densetec for bathroom partitions and countertops. I thought it might be lighter wieght and easier to install than corian and more durable than formcia.

Patty
__________________
PattyHamilton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-04-2010, 12:23   #13
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Port of Brownsville, WA
Boat: Ericson 39B
Posts: 34
SVEN

I used a heat gun to remove the old formica, I have done this at least a dozen times in houses and on boats. Once I get a corner started it goes fairley easy. You have to take your time because you do not want to peel up any plywood and go with the grain of the plywood. That is 30 year old glue, it will come off much easier than you may think. I then used adhesive remover to get everything off the counter tops, a lignt sanding by hand. Used the old as a template and installed the new. Of course I removed all moulding around the counter edges and removed the sink. I too have an Ericson 39B. E-mail me at mtinder@olympic.edu if you ever want to chat.
__________________
Sea Maid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-04-2010, 16:30   #14
Registered User
 
SabreKai's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Toronto, Canada on Lake Ontario
Boat: Roberts Offshore 38
Posts: 1,287
Images: 5
I peeled up 40 or 50 year old formica off the galley top on Espina. It was not a fun process. Stuff would not let go of the glue, heat gun or not. Ended up removing it in chunks along with bits of plywood. So now I have to look at screeding putty down on the counter top and sanding it flat before putting on the new stuff.

However, there is some sort of paint out there which you can paint onto old formica. Drys rock hard, and works well but I can't remember the name of it. You should be able to find it in any Home Depot or other DIY shop.


Sabre
__________________
SabreKai
SV Sabre Dance, Roberts Offshore 38
http://sabredancing.wordpress.com/
SabreKai is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-04-2010, 16:57   #15
Registered User
 
Fishman_Tx's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Beeville, Tx.
Boat: 1969 Morgan 40 Cruising Ketch "Lady Catherine II", 1973 Bristol 34 - "Our Baby"(RIP), Catalina 22
Posts: 876
Images: 12
Properly taking up the old and using it as a template would be the way to go. It makes the fitting the new material WAY easier. Yes, it's a bit of a pain, but it beats marking , remarking, cutting, remarking, trimming, cussing, tossing, starting over, and on and on.... ad infinitum.
For paint; sand, clean and prep properly, then Interlux. This what we're doing with the early 70's "oak" look. Homey wants a Herreshoff, so we're going white.

JMHO
__________________

__________________
Fish
"Behind every great man there is a woman, rolling her eyes."
But not for long! Now she's gone!
and peace and tranquility reign forever!
1969 Morgan 40 Cruising Ketch
Fishman_Tx is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Refinishing Aurelia Bowman Sailor Construction, Maintenance & Refit 5 06-10-2009 13:21
Keel refinishing Fotoman Construction, Maintenance & Refit 6 19-09-2008 12:45
Interior Refinishing.. avazquez Construction, Maintenance & Refit 23 13-01-2008 22:52
Wood refinishing tips Wahoo Sails Construction, Maintenance & Refit 29 08-10-2005 17:29
Refinishing Brass Tripwire Construction, Maintenance & Refit 5 05-05-2003 23:45



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:15.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.