Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 28-04-2008, 10:36   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Texas
Boat: Bacchant IV 36 "TRIO"
Posts: 9
Images: 2
Red Oak

Would like to find out about using red oak on boats?
dblue
__________________

__________________
dblue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-04-2008, 10:54   #2
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 223
Red oak and water aren't a good mix. Due to it's cell structure red oak soaks up water like a sponge. If you do plan on using red oak you might want to limit it's use to interior applications.
__________________

__________________
Efraim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-04-2008, 11:15   #3
Senior Cruiser
 
Vasco's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Toronto
Boat: CS36Merlin, "La Belle Aurore" Ben393 "Breathless"
Posts: 7,138
white oak is what you should use.
__________________
Rick I
Toronto in summer, Bahamas in winter.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/beneteau393/
Vasco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-04-2008, 13:33   #4
Senior Cruiser
 
Alan Wheeler's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Marlborough Sounds. New Zealand
Boat: Hartley Tahitian 45ft. Leisure Lady
Posts: 8,038
Images: 102
I don't think any Oak would be a good choice on the exterior. But interior finishing would be fine with any type. Ensure it is well seasoned as it can split and warp.
__________________
Wheels

For God so loved the world..........He didn't send a committee.
Alan Wheeler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-04-2008, 16:01   #5
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Macatawa Michigan
Boat: Amanda Faye 61' Custom Irwin aftcockpit ketch
Posts: 1,414
Images: 106
Red Oak is the wrong thing to use for or on a boat!
__________________
Gunner
irwinsailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-04-2008, 03:18   #6
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,586
Images: 240
Excerpted from:
Guidance on Inspection, Repair, and Maintenance of Wooden Hulls
US Coast Guard NVIC 7-95: uscg.mil/hq/g-m/nvic/7_95/n7-95.htm
NVIC 7-95

CHAPTER 3: MATERIAL

A. SHIPBUILDING WOOD

Wood is an engineering material. Douglas Fir, Southern Yellow Pine (long leaf), and White Oak furnish most of the wood used for boat and shipbuilding in the United States. Of these, Douglas Fir is the predominant choice due to availability and relatively rapid growth.

1. When requirements call for strength, moderate to good decay resistance and ability to hold fastenings well (frames, keels, stems, etc.), the following woods are most commonly used:

Douglas Fir
Southern Yellow Pine (long leaf)
Teak
Western Larch
White Oak

2. Where light wood, which is easy to work and is warp and decay resistant, is required (planking, etc.) the following woods are most commonly used:

Cypress
Mahogany
Cedar (Port Orford, Northern White, Western Red and Alaska)
Tangile (Philippine hardwood)

3. Where light, easily worked and strong woods of moderate to low decay resistance are required, the following woods have found favor:

Sitka Spruce
Western Hemlock
White Pine
Yellow Poplar

There are many other varieties suitable for boat use. These are listed together with their properties in The Encyclopedia of Wood and Wood - A Manual for its use as a Shipbuilding Material (References 1 and 10).

B. BENDING WOODS

Unseasoned White Oak is the choice bending wood ...
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-04-2008, 13:47   #7
Senior Cruiser
 
Alan Wheeler's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Marlborough Sounds. New Zealand
Boat: Hartley Tahitian 45ft. Leisure Lady
Posts: 8,038
Images: 102
That Hemlock must be nasty stuff to work with it it? I have seen a piece of it here in NZ. We don't have it grow here like in Europe. Here it gets to be nothing more than a spindly poisonous weed about 5ft tall.
In NZ we have a few timbers of choice for boat construction. Kahikatea or commonly and erroneously called white pine. A very clean and and highly stable timber.
Kauri. Very rare NZ native. These trees were huge ancient giants of our native forest. Apart from a few, the big old ones are all but gone now. Timber is stunning to work with and mostly comes from Fiji. A very poor example of the timber once grown here.
Matai or also commonly and incorrectly called Black Pine. Heavy and hard as hob nails timber. Very strong and hard wearing. Stunning grain and dark redish brown colour.
And one that is tremendously rare to find as a milled timber, but is fantastic for boat biulding is Pohutakawa. Or our NZ native "Christmas tree" as it always flowers at Christmas (well nearly always) with beautiful red delicate flowers.
__________________
Wheels

For God so loved the world..........He didn't send a committee.
Alan Wheeler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-04-2008, 15:07   #8
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Raleigh, NC
Boat: 1974 Columbia 41
Posts: 91
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan Wheeler View Post
That Hemlock must be nasty stuff to work with it it? I have seen a piece of it here in NZ. We don't have it grow here like in Europe. Here it gets to be nothing more than a spindly poisonous weed about 5ft tall.
Different plant all together. We can make a nice tea out of hemlock, out here. It is a conifer and can grow well over 30 feet. The other hemlock is poisonous as hell, but not a native plant in the US, I think a close relative is the poison sumac.
__________________
stoupidmonkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-04-2008, 23:52   #9
Senior Cruiser
 
Alan Wheeler's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Marlborough Sounds. New Zealand
Boat: Hartley Tahitian 45ft. Leisure Lady
Posts: 8,038
Images: 102
Arrrh OK. I was shown a piece of it and the guy told me it was bad news stuff to work with. Maybe he didn't actually realise it was something different. I think, but could be wrong, but I think it came in a Piano frame. There was Baltic Pine and a lump of this stuff inside. Would that be right? The guy was a woodworker and had spent several years in Europe, so I just assumed he knew.
__________________
Wheels

For God so loved the world..........He didn't send a committee.
Alan Wheeler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-04-2008, 03:38   #10
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,586
Images: 240
In North America, “Hemlock” is generally understood to mean the “Tsuga” genus of conifer (evergreen) tree, as opposed to the poisonous herb, “Conium maculatum”.

Hemlock Tea comes from the flat needles of this evergreen (no relation to the poisonous brew, made from the parsley-like ground plant, that killed Socrates).

Eastern Hemlock trees can take 250 to 300 years to reach maturity, and can live for 800 years or more. Mature trees reach heights of up to 60 to 70 Feet (18 - 21 m) and diameters of up to 2 to 3 Feet (60 to 90 cm).

The wood is brittle, splinters easily, and is knotty; which lowers its value as lumber. Hemlock is often used for coarse lumber, rough dimension stock, general construction, boxes, crates, railway ties and pulp.
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-04-2008, 13:40   #11
Senior Cruiser
 
Alan Wheeler's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Marlborough Sounds. New Zealand
Boat: Hartley Tahitian 45ft. Leisure Lady
Posts: 8,038
Images: 102
Quote:
Hemlock Tea comes from the flat needles of this evergreen
Mate! you'd want to know your Hemlock from Hemlock then wouldn't you.
__________________
Wheels

For God so loved the world..........He didn't send a committee.
Alan Wheeler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-04-2008, 17:24   #12
Registered User
 
Thermal's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Honolulu
Boat: S2 11.0C 36' Puka Wai
Posts: 157
Images: 1
Red oad will turn black, permanently, if it comes in contact with water. White oak is stronger and good for structural applications but will also turn black from contact water so I would not use it for any finish work on a boat.
__________________

__________________
In theory, Practice and Theory are the same. In practice, they are not.
Thermal is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Queen of Oak Bay report in - Accident rsn48 Off Topic Forum 3 29-10-2006 22:59
oak frames rodv Construction, Maintenance & Refit 4 07-06-2005 06:47
Oak floorboards in cabin? Trecksail Construction, Maintenance & Refit 6 06-02-2005 18:58
Red Sea Alan Wheeler Health, Safety & Related Gear 0 03-09-2004 15:51



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 14:12.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.