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Old 13-12-2009, 12:10   #1
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Question Project Boat - Good Idea?

hello all,
I need some advice and input from other who know more about sailboats and the cost associated with them. My mom wants to live on a sailboat. she used to live on a 1977 26' Seafarer sailboat and loves them. recently she has been wanting to get back on a boat and so we started looking for boats. Particularly the 26' Seafarer because she knows the boat so well and all her stuff fits, the draft is shallow for florida keys cruising, and the deck is solid fiberglass(not cored like most boats were in the 70's.

We have a 7-8k budget to get a boat and fix it up as much as we can. we have looked at Seafarers that are OK..for around 6800 plus we need it shipped to Louisiana (another 1500-2000) so thats pushing the limit.

ok so now that you have the background here the question. We found a 1978 26' Seafarer in Texas that is in need of some TLC.. the boat is way up by Oklahoma and has been forgotten about for 3 years basically. the marina is tired of having it and so we offered $1500 for it. they accepted (they wanted 5k). so how we are trying to decide if its a good thing or not. we can get it shipped to louisiana for $1500, put in a boatyard and we'd have 4-5k to put into the boat..this is what it needs

the port holes and hatches leak-need those repaired
the deisel engine needs a tune up
it needs a full shorepower system put in it.(provisions for thru holes for a marine ac unit now or down the road)
the hull and bottom need to be painted
the prop needs to be packed
it needs new cushions and covers(my mom sews canvas so can do that cheap)
it needs some sails and maybe the top of the boat buffed out.
needs new companion way doors.
perhaps the front hatch fiberglassed up.

the other wood refinishing and inside clean can be done by us at a minimal fee.

with this budget does it make sense to try and hire somepeople to do this work and do whatever we can with the boat?

it couls be customized and made to how my mom wants it instead of buying an "ok" boat for more and not being able to do much work to it.

Thanks so much for any advice or opinions, we have 45 days to decide.

Any other suggestions for a 26' liveaboard sailboat with a draft less than 4', that doesnt have a wood cored deck(my mom is afraid of expensive deck rot). that would be in the 8k max price range?
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Old 13-12-2009, 13:11   #2
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Well..... I looked at some of the 26's listed on yachtworld and they look to be in much better shape that what you are about to undertake with the Okie boat

26 seafarer Boats For Sale


The price listed on yachtworld...is asking price...make them an offer..leaving yourself money for shipping, Or wait till spring and sail it to the keys..(if it's up north)... How would you inspect any boat, that is far away..is another challenge

26 ft. is a small boat for 2 people to live on...but I trust you know what your reasons are.

Living on the BIG project boat while fixing it, isn't going to be pretty...especially if it leaks like crazy.

In short....I'd get the boat that is closer to being able to get wet..than one that has been neglected for years.....Florida is where I'd look...

I'm playing along here...and not asking ...why not expand the criteria to include other boats....
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Old 13-12-2009, 13:26   #3
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I don't know what prices are like in La but on the Chesapeake you could not have a boatyard even come close to that for your budget. You might could get the portholes and hatches or the electric system done but probably not both. Then again it is a small boat and you might find a craftsman to work just for you for a reasonable hourly fee and do it. Fiberglass work seemed to be very expensive.
I have just completed a refit of a much larger boat and went back to the receipts and was amazed at what something that I would have thought was a little project actually cost when you add in the screws, latches, hinges, caulk, etc. It easily doubled what I would have estimated even after I did the job.
Even just getting the boat "sailable" you might need dock lines, electric cords, fenders, lifesling/horseshoe, etc that can really add up.
I just priced sails for a 38 foot boat and the main and genoa alone were over $6000. Your would be much cheaper but even cheaper that would take a big bite out of 4-5K.
I would not want to try it for that amount even doing all my own work but buying used and salvaging old parts you might do it. Others might have much better luck doing it cheaper then I have.
Can you rent/borrow a truck and trailer and pull it to La yourself. That might give you some more money to play with.
Good luck.

Jim
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Old 13-12-2009, 14:09   #4
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I agree with Jkeins...you are going to have to do the work yourself...figure 75.00 per hour min. at any yard...I heard of one fella that found 40.00 but I don't know where that was nor if he ended up happy with the work or not.

My gut feeling is if this boat was already in your backyard it would be a positive undertaking...but having to fork out 1500 from your very tight budget to truck it + the haul out and cleaning charge + the de-rigging expense to get it ready to ship..you are in the hole right from the get go and it would be money ahead to pay up front for one closer and in better condition.

I have brought back two boats from the dead and I would only ever do that again for a really special boat..it ALWAYS takes more money and time then you think it is going to..and seldom does it pay out better then you could have bought a like boat in ready to sail condition.

IMHO there is really only 2 benefits to resurrecting a boat...

Firstly is bringing life back into a forgotten object, be that boat ,plane, car, house..whatever... if you enjoy the work and challenge its rewarding to you to do, in and of itself.. and the act itself is almost enough.

Secondly it allows someone to chip away at owning a boat they could never be able to buy in the first place...but this has to be more then a whim for this to work out as one of two things happen...

1) Either all your spare money and time is directed toward the goal or the project drags on and you end up regretting the decision possibly dumping it along with most if not all you have invested in it so far as you will be like the marina just hoping /wishing it was gone and out of your life.

2) You develop the mind set that this project takes as long at it takes without you getting in the dumps about it and your able to start and stop the project as time and money allows.......don't plan on moving aboard any time soon with this approach so be realistic about it from the get go and what is really driving this undertaking.

Form the sounds of it its your mom wanting to live aboard again ..not rebuild a boat no matter how many skills she has. So just be realistic as to how long and how much money this is really going to be all about...The Honeymoon is over in about 2 weeks..after that its a job like any other...make sure you enjoy the work or you will become disillusioned.

I don't often recommend this but in your situation I would recommend spending every penny you have on the right sailable boat up front ( if you both have paying jobs..to fix an emergency repair to keep the boat afloat and pay for moorage, ins etc.) then enjoy it for what it is right now and remodel things as time and money allows.
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Old 13-12-2009, 16:38   #5
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One thing I always tell may clients before starting a project boat is to look at how much the boat is worth finished vers what you will have to put into it. And this does not include labor that is a complete write off. Just because you put 10 grand into a boat will not mean it is worth 10 grand more. The seafarer you are talking about average listing price is 5000, which means selling price will be around 4500. you are talking about spending 3000 just to get the boat. See where I am going with this? Leaves you a thin margin on this one. I would look for a better deal myself.

That said back in another life i worked for Seafarer in Huntington NY. These are not great boats. I think you could do better. Do not by just because there is some nostalgia that is a poor reason to make this decision. I would look at getting as much boat as you can for the money as you will be living aboard. If you are going to fix one up make sure it will be worth your effort when you go to sell.

Good luck and keep us posted

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projectboatzen.com
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Old 13-12-2009, 18:37   #6
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Having completely rebuilt a couple boats, I am convinced that anyone would be better off financially paying substantially more (relative to the purchase price) for a boat in good basic shape ( engine, structure, and fundamental equipment for your intended use) than even doing all the work yourself. The margin more that a well-maintained boat gets in the market rarely compensates the seller for maintenance efforts and that benefits buyers. I have learned a lot and I know my boat well as a result of rebuilding it, but that is the only advantage to resurrection.
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Old 13-12-2009, 18:47   #7
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I agree with sailvayu, what is the return value?

A friend of mine died last Friday he put around $70K into his boat but the average price of it on the market is around $30K. No matter what his investment was his family will only recover the going market value. Its a shame.
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Old 13-12-2009, 19:02   #8
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Not a shame at all it was his dream. So it wasn't realized he pushed the boundries of expectations and hopefully enjoyed the work.You are right though boats are rarely a profitable investment. Go into eyes wide open. I have a dream and this is what I enjoy doing. You can flip a boat for profit but it requires experience and an alignment of lucky stars. I have waisted more hours and money on boats. It is my passion so it is a shame I chased my dreams. Wouldn't have it any other way.
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Old 13-12-2009, 19:17   #9
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I just did a quick yachtworld search, parameters of 27-30, 15K max price, Gulf Coast region. 16 boats came up, one of them is a Cape Dory 28 in TX, Check that one out.
link here
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Old 13-12-2009, 19:26   #10
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Yje 100 volt work would be pretty simple for that boat.

Portholes are goung to be labor intensive.....

Your budget would not fit into any yard....

Take your time, come back here often and DIY
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Old 13-12-2009, 19:42   #11
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Wink

thanks so much for all your help. Im taking all this advice very seriously in our decision.

to clear a few things up this boat is for my mom only..not 2 people. and the slip she has is a 26'. not any bigger can fit. because of hurricanes in this area, getting into a good protected marina is difficult so she'd like to stay in the 26' range.

What other 26' boats do people recommend to live on (good storage, wide beam, galley aft..)?

It seems to me with all the boats Ive researched that most have wood cored decks at least on some point. and my mom is really really afraid of getting a boat and then finding out later that the deck is rotten and she has to spend more money that she doesn't have to fix what will be her house for at least 10 more years.. Is deck delamination a real problem with alot of these boats..thanks so much!
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Old 13-12-2009, 19:49   #12
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What?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Engineer View Post
Yje 100 volt work would be pretty simple for that boat.
Huh???
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Old 13-12-2009, 19:56   #13
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Quote:
my mom is really really afraid of getting a boat and then finding out later that the deck is rotten and she has to spend more money that she doesn't have
That's what a survey is for.

regards,
MikeZ
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Old 13-12-2009, 20:05   #14
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Look for a Com-Pac 27, maybe a 25, not that I'm biased or anything. You seem very concerned about the wood cored deck. Com-Pacs are foam cored where they are cored. Very big on the inside for their size. Shallow draft, lots of storage. VERY well built, strong owners group.
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Old 13-12-2009, 20:08   #15
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Well, if you want to expand your options.

Catalina 25's would fit your budget and you'd find a lot more of them to choose from
Trailorable...swing keels, for the flats

Bristol 26's
Pearsons
MacGregor
Grampian

to name a few...

Here's a head turner... View Boat Photos - YachtWorld.com
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