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Old 03-03-2010, 07:00   #16
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Acrylic latex paint was originally developed as a flexible and durable coating suitable to repaint chalking aluminum siding, at least 50 years ago.... I have used Benjamin Moore exterior-grade acrylic latex epoxy porch floor paint...
This is not unlike George Beuhler’s philosophy, although it may not always pass the sniff test down at the yacht-club, more than a few of the better looking work boats use high-end Lowes/Home-Depot paint not only for looks, but for protection… I’m seriously thinking about giving it a whirl on the interior of mine, contrarian that I am…
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Old 03-03-2010, 07:18   #17
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quality water based paint like benjamin moore is good stuff and comes in an eggshell finish that really looks good .. i am using it inside lockers and cabinets.
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Old 05-04-2010, 12:33   #18
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quality water based paint like benjamin moore is good stuff and comes in an eggshell finish that really looks good .. i am using it inside lockers and cabinets.
So does it mean that the paint is mildew resistant? I need to paint the inside of my cabinets and I am looking for the MOST mildew resistant paint available that can be applied over gelcoat.
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Old 05-04-2010, 12:44   #19
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So does it mean that the paint is mildew resistant? I need to paint the inside of my cabinets and I am looking for the MOST mildew resistant paint available that can be applied over gelcoat.
We have been using this for sometime now inside lockers, compartments and inside the bilge and engine compartment, http://tinyurl.com/yenfvzh and just need to have a clean surface, no sanding. We have not seen a sign of mildew or mold at all and it is mostly fiberglass and older gelcoat that we are covering. We don't topcoat it. WG
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Old 05-04-2010, 12:53   #20
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So does it mean that the paint is mildew resistant? I need to paint the inside of my cabinets and I am looking for the MOST mildew resistant paint available that can be applied over gelcoat.
Paint dealers that sell Benjamin Moore house paints also sell anti-mildew additives that they will mix in for you when they machine-shake the can. This is frequently recommended for house paints that will be used on a northern or shady exposure.
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Old 06-04-2010, 16:26   #21
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Paint dealers that sell Benjamin Moore house paints also sell anti-mildew additives that they will mix in for you when they machine-shake the can. This is frequently recommended for house paints that will be used on a northern or shady exposure.
I started with ben moore and the paint kinda flaked so I think that it it is oil base that is already on the boat....they said that I did not need to use prime....I think if I use that paint I need to use kiltz or got to another paint any suggestions...thankw
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Old 06-04-2010, 16:45   #22
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For interior use on my own boat, I use Brightside one-part polyurethane. I am currently experimenting with mildew additives, comparing them to a limited remaining supply of tributyltin oxide as my standard baseline. Needless to say, I don't go around licking my hullsides or cabinet interiors. But I definitely save it for my overheads covered by insulation and facings. Mildew is not good.
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Old 06-04-2010, 16:50   #23
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For inside work I use an acrylic paint designed for bath/kitchen. Since there is very little direct exposure to sunlight I find it lasts well, and is cheap to boot. Last time I used it was to redo the hull sides above the shelves. The interior was originally finished in heavy cloth contact cemented over the inside glass skin. This had over the years peeled off in spots and been water damaged due to leakage thru the stanchion bases and the chainplates. I yanked off the cloth and tried to scrape off the contact cement, no joy there. So I used the paint on the contact cement. Two coats gave me a bright white with a stucco look. Worked fine for me.

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Old 06-04-2010, 18:25   #24
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For inside work I use an acrylic paint designed for bath/kitchen. Since there is very little direct exposure to sunlight I find it lasts well, and is cheap to boot. Last time I used it was to redo the hull sides above the shelves. The interior was originally finished in heavy cloth contact cemented over the inside glass skin. This had over the years peeled off in spots and been water damaged due to leakage thru the stanchion bases and the chainplates. I yanked off the cloth and tried to scrape off the contact cement, no joy there. So I used the paint on the contact cement. Two coats gave me a bright white with a stucco look. Worked fine for me.

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If I used brightside what prime should I use?
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Old 06-04-2010, 19:50   #25
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I started with ben moore and the paint kinda flaked so I think that it it is oil base that is already on the boat....they said that I did not need to use prime....I think if I use that paint I need to use kiltz or got to another paint any suggestions...thankw
My experience with it was good, and it should stick to an oil base regardless. Perhaps your surface prep wasn't good. Was the surface chemically clean? You should call Benjamin Moore tech support if you need further advice.
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Old 06-04-2010, 20:08   #26
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If I used brightside what prime should I use?
They make a primer as well that works well although I think I'm using a generic home depot exterior primer. Haven't had any problems with that.

Brightside is good stuff. For exterior, if you want it done right, use awlgrip. I use brightside on the exteriors as well just because it's easier to work with and I'm okay redoing the paint every few years. I'm a bad painter.
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Old 07-04-2010, 04:02   #27
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I have two Benjamin Moore stores so am a little biased (and too cheap to "buy" paint). I use BM's KP22 urethane alkyd gloss enamel and KP24 direct to metal modified alkyd semi-gloss enamel for interior use and KP74 aliphatic urethane for the topside. Other than anti-fouling paint you can find equivalent products to almost any "marine" coating in various companies industrial line-ups. The best part is that industrial coatings tend to be priced very competitively while marine products aren't due to it being a smaller market with less competition. I don't know the numbers but I'm sure Akzo Nobel (Intelux, International, Awlgrip, Cetol) has a near monopoly and prices accordingly.
On the latex issue - I wouldn't use it on my boat. Latex is the best thing for architectural but for industrial and marine applications urethanes and epoxies are the way to go.
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Old 07-04-2010, 07:18   #28
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I have two Benjamin Moore stores so am a little biased (and too cheap to "buy" paint). I use BM's KP22 urethane alkyd gloss enamel and KP24 direct to metal modified alkyd semi-gloss enamel for interior use and KP74 aliphatic urethane for the topside. Other than anti-fouling paint you can find equivalent products to almost any "marine" coating in various companies industrial line-ups. The best part is that industrial coatings tend to be priced very competitively while marine products aren't due to it being a smaller market with less competition. I don't know the numbers but I'm sure Akzo Nobel (Intelux, International, Awlgrip, Cetol) has a near monopoly and prices accordingly.
On the latex issue - I wouldn't use it on my boat. Latex is the best thing for architectural but for industrial and marine applications urethanes and epoxies are the way to go.
The floor and patio paint has epoxy in it...it is a semi gloss.will us latex kiltz
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Old 07-04-2010, 10:17   #29
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Since Camd introduced the linear polyurethanes (LPU) into the conversation, Detco's Sterling LPU is my personal favorite. I've used it for 32 years (when I built the boat in 1978, when I repainted it in the early nineties, and beginning with the deck to waterline three years ago and the cabinsides last year. I'll put the final deck and cabintop coat next year before I take off. I was going to use LP in the head but ruled it out for the highly toxic fumes I wouldn't have been able to avoid, even with full air supply masks. LPU is great, but it can be deadly if you don't use adequate precautions. The Brightside is a one-part polyurethane, which means it has polyurethane solids in an oil based vehicle. This makes it good for abrasion (scouring the head and galley when they get filthy) and resistant to limited ultraviolet. But the repaint cycle is greater than for LPU. Epoxy paints are durable for abrasion, but don't hold up well to ultraviolet. I use them for garage floors, and you can use them for bilges, but above the sole you are taking your chances with yellowing and breakdown. I use the Brightside primer (it has a different name, which doesn't come to mind right now) to start with over old sanded paint. It's easy to sand, covers the substrate well, and lends itself to an excellent prep for two topcoats of finish Brightside.
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Old 07-04-2010, 10:30   #30
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The floor and patio paint has epoxy in it...it is a semi gloss.will us latex kiltz
Yes that is an epoxy reinforced latex. It's actually what BM calls a satin finish which is a little less shiny than a semi-gloss. I had never thought to use that on my boat. It should work well.
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