Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 29-10-2008, 10:35   #286
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 11
If one was open minded, there is plenty of data showing that global warming is occuring, but has nothing to do with man -- thus making it a less interesting story to exploit. One would have to be open minded though.
__________________

__________________
Capt. Dan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-10-2008, 10:51   #287
Registered User
 
NOLA_sailing's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: New Orleans, LA
Boat: Catalina 30 Tall Rig
Posts: 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by ronniesimpson View Post
nick, i don't think my exploits are on the same scale as the election, Iraq, and the financial crisis. thanks for the plug, though. haha.
Ronnie for President?
__________________

__________________
NOLA_sailing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-10-2008, 10:51   #288
Senior Cruiser
 
sneuman's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2003
Location: Jamaica
Boat: Tayana 37 Cutter
Posts: 3,167
Images: 37
As a lifelong journalist, I periodically hear this complaint about focusing only on "bad news". As I like pointing out "Man Arrives Home Safely From Work" does not a headline make.

Furthermore, journalism is -- unfortunately, in many cases - a business. If you all wanted to pay money to read "good news" (that is what you say you want), there would be a market for it. You don't want to read it, so there isn't (a market, that is).

Think about it: how many of you have read books on the ill-fated 1979 Fastnet Race or the 1998 Sydney to Hobart? Would you read a book (if there was one) about the 2007 Sydney to Hobart? Nothing spectacular about that race. No headlines, no books, no interest.

In a larger sense, it is (ideally) journalism's underlying raison d'etre to shine a light on what is wrong, so that presumably what's wrong can be set right. When all you hear is "good news" about the government, the economy, crime, etc., you'll know you're living in a totalitarian regime (or just watching too much Fox News Channel)!
__________________
Voyage of Symbiosis: http://svsymbiosis.blogspot.com/
sneuman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-10-2008, 11:00   #289
Registered User
 
NOLA_sailing's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: New Orleans, LA
Boat: Catalina 30 Tall Rig
Posts: 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by sneuman View Post
As a lifelong journalist, I periodically hear this complaint about focusing only on "bad news". As I like pointing out "Man Arrives Home Safely From Work" does not a headline make.

Furthermore, journalism is -- unfortunately, in many cases - a business. If you all wanted to pay money to read "good news" (that is what you say you want), there would be a market for it. You don't want to read it, so there isn't (a market, that is).

Think about it: how many of you have read books on the ill-fated 1979 Fastnet Race or the 1998 Sydney to Hobart? Would you read a book (if there was one) about the 2007 Sydney to Hobart? Nothing spectacular about that race. No headlines, no books, no interest.

In a larger sense, it is (ideally) journalism's underlying raison d'etre to shine a light on what is wrong, so that presumably what's wrong can be set right. When all you hear is "good news" about the government, the economy, crime, etc., you'll know you're living in a totalitarian regime (or just watching too much Fox News Channel)!
I agree that journalism, as a business, is catering to the culture of disaster obsession (why do people REALLY watch NASCAR?). The other side of the coin, however, is how competitive the media has become due to the now instant, 24 hour access by its consumers across countless mediums. The ante is increasingly upped making the hype and suspense that can be placed on the news overly intensified to outdo the other guys.
__________________
NOLA_sailing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-10-2008, 11:04   #290
Senior Cruiser
 
sneuman's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2003
Location: Jamaica
Boat: Tayana 37 Cutter
Posts: 3,167
Images: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA_sailing View Post
I agree that journalism, as a business, is catering to the culture of disaster obsession (why do people REALLY watch NASCAR?). The other side of the coin, however, is how competitive the media has become due to the now instant, 24 hour access by its consumers across countless mediums. The ante is increasingly upped making the hype and suspense that can be placed on the news overly intensified to outdo the other guys.
I couldn't agree more. I have often said (only half jokingly) that helicopters were the worst thing to ever happen to the profession.

For the record, I have worked in print (AP, Wall Street Journal) and radio (NPR), but have steered clear of television.
__________________
Voyage of Symbiosis: http://svsymbiosis.blogspot.com/
sneuman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-10-2008, 11:53   #291
Registered User
 
LakeSuperior's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Boat: Teak Yawl, 37'
Posts: 1,581
Images: 7
While we're on the topic of news...consider the fate of the Detroit Free Press when they wrote an article critical of the big three auto makers about 15 years ago. Their Sunday advertising supplement went down by 2/3's. Rightfully punished I guess.

This lesson is why I value opinions in Practical Sailor over the rest of the Sailing Mags.
__________________
LakeSuperior is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-10-2008, 12:11   #292
Registered User

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Today, Australia, tomorrow, who knows.
Boat: Aries 32
Posts: 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by sneuman View Post
As a lifelong journalist, I periodically hear this complaint about focusing only on "bad news". As I like pointing out "Man Arrives Home Safely From Work" does not a headline make.
A fair balance is all I'm personally interested in.

If you think popular media is currently well balanced, all I can do is sit here and laugh. A good and recent example is the public endorsement of Obama by many of the large newspapers. If a newspaper can endorse a candidate, then it can endorse any of it's own agenda... Therefore if it's own agenda is to sell newspapers (which it is; it's a business), naturally proliferating bad news with 95pt headlines is kin to printing money.

Anyway, I'm not the only disenfranchised media consumer - Many people are turning to blogs en masse, because of the hype and bias...

Anyway, I'm more interested in hearing about Ronnie's book deals, magazine articles, and his search for a $5,000 ocean ready vessel, amongst the lady boys and the other assorted folk of Hong Kong. Media bias and CO2 (both of which I probably somewhat responsible for bringing up) are currently mundane topics when there is a storm tactic debate going on.
__________________
nickj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-10-2008, 12:17   #293
Senior Cruiser
 
sneuman's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2003
Location: Jamaica
Boat: Tayana 37 Cutter
Posts: 3,167
Images: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by nickj View Post
A fair balance is all I'm personally interested in.

If you think popular media is currently well balanced, all I can do is sit here and laugh. A good and recent example is the public endorsement of Obama by many of the large newspapers. If a newspaper can endorse a candidate, then it can endorse any of it's own agenda... Therefore if it's own agenda is to sell newspapers (which it is; it's a business), naturally proliferating bad news with 95pt headlines is kin to printing money.

Anyway, I'm not the only disenfranchised media consumer - Many people are turning to blogs en masse, because of the hype and bias...

Anyway, I'm more interested in hearing about Ronnie's book deals, magazine articles, and his search for a $5,000 ocean ready vessel, amongst the lady boys and the other assorted folk of Hong Kong. Media bias and CO2 (both of which I probably somewhat responsible for bringing up) are currently mundane topics when there is a storm tactic debate going on.
Perhaps you are young, but newspaper editorial page endorsements are a very old tradition. Btw, the vast majority of those endorsements (at least in the middle of the country) have gone to Republicans over the years. This year appears to be the exception.
__________________
Voyage of Symbiosis: http://svsymbiosis.blogspot.com/
sneuman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-10-2008, 12:20   #294
Registered User

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Today, Australia, tomorrow, who knows.
Boat: Aries 32
Posts: 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by sneuman View Post
Perhaps you are young, but newspaper editorial page endorsements are a very old tradition. Btw, the vast majority of those endorsements (at least in the middle of the country) have gone to Republicans.
Yes, maybe I am young, but I'm also not from the US, and have not experienced newspaper endorsements before... Anyway, interesting they are mostly Republican endorsements, from what I've heard on the radio, it would seem the other way around.

Tick tick tick (I just looked into that quote):

"As of 10/27, among the top 100 papers, Obama has been endorsed by papers with a circulation of 16.0 Million, McCain by papers with a circulation of 4.2 Million, and papers with a circulation of 0.8 Million have announced they will not be endorsing a candidate."

n
__________________
nickj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-10-2008, 12:25   #295
Senior Cruiser
 
sneuman's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2003
Location: Jamaica
Boat: Tayana 37 Cutter
Posts: 3,167
Images: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by nickj View Post
Yes, maybe I am young, but I'm also not from the US, and have not experienced newspaper endorsements before... Anyway, interesting they are mostly Republican endorsements, from what I've heard on the radio, it would seem the other way around.

Tick tick tick (I just looked into that quote):

"As of 10/27, among the top 100 papers, Obama has been endorsed by papers with a circulation of 16.0 Million, McCain by papers with a circulation of 4.2 Million, and papers with a circulation of 0.8 Million have announced they will not be endorsing a candidate."

n
I am sorry, you posted while I was editing for clarity. I added "over the years" to emphasize that this year is the exception. In any case, newspaper endorsements are probably largely irrelevant these days considering, as you point out, all the other so-called media out there.
__________________
Voyage of Symbiosis: http://svsymbiosis.blogspot.com/
sneuman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-10-2008, 12:32   #296
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,587
Images: 240
Let's not stray into partisan politics.

Many people confuse what they read in a newspaper, with news.
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 29-10-2008, 12:32   #297
CF Adviser
Moderator Emeritus
 
TaoJones's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Montrose, Colorado
Posts: 9,850
Quote:
Originally Posted by sneuman View Post
<snip>

In a larger sense, it is (ideally) journalism's underlying raison d'etre to shine a light on what is wrong, so that presumably what's wrong can be set right. When all you hear is "good news" about the government, the economy, crime, etc., you'll know you're living in a totalitarian regime (or just watching too much Fox News Channel)!
Perhaps it's just nuance, sneuman, but I believe that journalism's reason for being is to shine a light on what is outside the norm. That is, those things that are one or two deviations above or below the mean are "news," whether they're perceived to be "good" or "bad."

For example, the discovery of Steve Fossett's unfortunate small plane crash near Mammoth recently was certainly newsworthy, but not because it was "wrong." And, when set beside all of his many sailing and flying exploits that were deemed equally newsworthy, the discovery of his crashed plane was mostly of interest because of who he was and the fact that he'd been missing for about a year. That made this one small plane crash different from any of the dozens of others that had occurred over the last year.

So, in my view, Fossett's many world record adventures were "good news" (if the only options are "good" or "bad"), and his being killed by flying his small plane into the side of a mountain is "bad news." What made these things newsworthy is the fact that each deviated from the mean.

Further, the judgment of whether something is good or bad, or right or wrong, is a subjective thing within the perception of each news-reader, -listener or -watcher. A reporter's job is to gather the facts surrounding an event that deviates from the mean, assemble them into an interesting presentation that neither changes nor distorts those facts, then ignore any and all praise and/or condemnation for his presentation as he moves on to the next event.

TaoJones
__________________
"Your vision becomes clear only when you look into your own heart. Who looks outside, dreams; who looks within, awakens."
Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961)
TaoJones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-10-2008, 12:43   #298
Senior Cruiser
 
sneuman's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2003
Location: Jamaica
Boat: Tayana 37 Cutter
Posts: 3,167
Images: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by TaoJones View Post
Perhaps it's just nuance, sneuman, but I believe that journalism's reason for being is to shine a light on what is outside the norm. That is, those things that are one or two deviations above or below the mean are "news," whether they're perceived to be "good" or "bad."

For example, the discovery of Steve Fossett's unfortunate small plane crash near Mammoth recently was certainly newsworthy, but not because it was "wrong." And, when set beside all of his many sailing and flying exploits that were deemed equally newsworthy, the discovery of his crashed plane was mostly of interest because of who he was and the fact that he'd been missing for about a year. That made this one small plane crash different from any of the dozens of others that had occurred over the last year.

So, in my view, Fossett's many world record adventures were "good news" (if the only options are "good" or "bad"), and his being killed by flying his small plane into the side of a mountain is "bad news." What made these things newsworthy is the fact that each deviated from the mean.

Further, the judgment of whether something is good or bad, or right or wrong, is a subjective thing within the perception of each news-reader, -listener or -watcher. A reporter's job is to gather the facts surrounding an event that deviates from the mean, assemble them into an interesting presentation that neither changes nor distorts those facts, then ignore any and all praise and/or condemnation for his presentation as he moves on to the next event.

TaoJones
Quite right and well said. My "good news", "bad news" comparison was largely metaphorical. I placed the argument in that context because that is often the form that complaints take: "Why don't you print some good news?"
__________________
Voyage of Symbiosis: http://svsymbiosis.blogspot.com/
sneuman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-10-2008, 13:02   #299
Registered User
 
Amgine's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Vancouver BC
Posts: 1,384
Images: 1
I might take it somewhat differently as well. News is presenting information generally unknown to the audience and yet which is relevant to them.

To take your expample of the 2007 Hobart race, I'd bet a large percentage of the CF readership would be interested in examinations of some of the new technologies used in the race, expert forensic examination of the weather strategies used and how they compared with both the actual weather and their results - both in the racing point of view and the just sailing fast point of view. A few of us would like the chapters about the various designs, maybe some "embedded" reporting about the sailors and boats involved, the rivalries and syndicates, etc.

This would be great news coverage for us, because we weren't there but it's something relevant to us.

Bringing this back to Ronnie and CF... Yes, he's probably going to be able to write material for niche markets specifically targeting us - Sailors. Most likely he'll fail to succeed unless he writes a much more sympathetic story than he started with here, because we weren't swayed very much and we're that same target audience. He might also try to market the story to a wider audience, maybe emphasizing the he-man elements, or better yet the "I'm more ignorant than you and I messed up" angle (oh c'mon! how many of you *haven't* felt a bit smug when some newbie sailor pulls in to the anchorage and messes the anchor set up royally?)

News is infotainment. It must be entertaining long enough to inform.


__________________
Amgine
Blog

On the internet, nobody knows you're a dog anchored in a coral atoll.
Amgine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-10-2008, 13:20   #300
Kai Nui
Guest

Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA_sailing View Post
Ronnie for President?
Unfortunately, the minimum age for President in the US is 35.
__________________

__________________
  Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How Far Offshore is Offshore? Jay Jennings General Sailing Forum 57 30-03-2017 15:16
Old Sailor Sayings --> Sailor Tattoos Loc_Dog General Sailing Forum 23 11-10-2015 00:36
Lady Sailor Wants to Meet Gentleman Sailor Captain Pam Crew Archives 29 28-05-2011 14:16
Offshore Advice sfbay Pacific & South China Sea 32 15-09-2008 18:26
Beaching offshore 47 CARL Monohull Sailboats 0 13-06-2006 13:58



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:40.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.