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Old 01-07-2013, 07:13   #1
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Luger Leeward Restoration Thread

Well! I'm new here and I introduced myself in the "meets and greets" sub forum. (Here is the thread link! Greetings from south central ky )

I purchased a Luger Leeward, 16-foot monohull sailboat, in rough condition. Included with the purchase are the centerboard, the rudder and hardware, the original mast in good shape, the boom in good shape, main and jib sail in decent shape (main has a small 1/2-3/4-inch hole,) a small gas motor that needs work, standing rigging possibly salvageable, and a good trailer. The hull is in good shape with no rot, blistering, or repairs.

So far I've washed and vacuumed the entire boat. I cleared a space in the barn / shop and put it under cover. I hoisted it off the trailer so I could place it lower to the ground to make working on the inside easier. This will also allow me to disassemble / clean / restore the trailer when I can't work on the boat. I've taken off the trim and removed the seats, foam, and wood from the interior. I am carefully labeling all of the trim as it is in good shape and will be reused.

I am now working on removing the wooden ribs that the original decking fastened to. That is going well.
One setback I had is that the wooden ribs on either side of the centerboard housing, are screwed in from inside the centerboard housing. Also the original bedding compound that glued the two sides of the centerboard housing together, is shot and needs replacing. I will have to cut out and removed the centerboard housing. As long as I don't tear anything up, I'll be able to reuse the original housing.

OK! Enough jibber jabber. Time for some pics!

Boat before cleanup.


A look at the inside.


The motor and rudder.


After about two hours of scrubbing....




Checking the mast before putting the boat in the barn.


Under cover!


Hoisted up and the trailer removed.


A view from the second story.


The top thing-a-ma-bobber removed.


Me unscrewing stuff! Seats removed!


One of my brothers removing foam.


Both of my brothers helping out!


These are the ribs that are coming out. You can actually see them, now that it's all vacuumed out.


Ohh look, more foam!



More progress later. I work full time for myself, so I'll only be able to devote a few afternoons and Saturdays to this project.
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Old 01-07-2013, 07:35   #2
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Re: Luger Leeward restoration thread

I love it when youth and enthusiasm collide with and old boat in need of some love and attention. It's so inspiring.

Welcome to the forums, and keep us updated on your progress. It's so much more entertaining to watch someone else work on their boat than to confront my list of boat projects
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Old 01-07-2013, 13:13   #3
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Re: Luger Leeward restoration thread

Great job. The little cabin top is called a cuddy or cabin top. The ribs don't need to come out. Mostly the wood is there to shape the fiberglass wrap around the pieces of wood which is your strength. Yes, you can remove them and replace them but I'd not bother and just put a couple more layers of glass over each one and seal the ends with more fiberglass tape.
Before taking your daggerboard trunk apart make certain you've got lots of photos and that you have thought through how you'd be putting it back together. Lugers were kit boats and someone might still have a set of plans if you need them. The company is long gone but an internet search might get you blueprints.
Depending on who put the boat together is the quality of fittings and fasteners you find. When you put things back in place make certain you use stainless or bronze and that way you'll never have to worry about rust.
kind regards,
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Old 01-07-2013, 14:37   #4
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Re: Luger Leeward restoration thread

A cabin top that is called a cabin top! Sweet! I love simplicity in terms.


The wooden ribs are complete mush. They would never hold the deck fasteners.
The fiberglass strips that cover the wood are in horrid condition as well. In some cases, you can just tear it up by hand.

The centerboard trunk does concern me, just because it does need to be put back in just right. Finding some old plans is a great idea! Thanks for the suggestion.

I'm going to try to pick up a new spark plug for the motor today.....
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Old 02-07-2013, 02:05   #5
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Re: Luger Leeward restoration thread

Looking good!

If you enjoy fiddling around with bits of boat she looks spot on - nice to see someone start with less than 40 foot of doer upper (for a change!). Yer gonna learn a sh#t load that will be useful and save money should you later go larger - mostly about not buying too many "5 minute jobs"!

Keep posting the pics!
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Old 02-07-2013, 02:21   #6
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Re: Luger Leeward restoration thread

From the pictures it's a lovely boat. Makes me wish I had all that 20 year old energy again.

I'd post photos of my current restoration project but sadly it would be a series of bilge photos showing smelly inaccessible tanks. I think I prefer your project.

Good luck and don't rush the job. (though it looks like you are much less likely to do that than I was at 20)

Matt
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Old 02-07-2013, 06:59   #7
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Re: Luger Leeward restoration thread

Have you visited The Perfect Dinghy ?
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Old 02-07-2013, 12:44   #8
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Re: Luger Leeward restoration thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiprJohn View Post
Great job. The little cabin top is called a cuddy or cabin top. The ribs don't need to come out. Mostly the wood is there to shape the fiberglass wrap around the pieces of wood which is your strength. Yes, you can remove them and replace them but I'd not bother and just put a couple more layers of glass over each one and seal the ends with more fiberglass tape.
Before taking your daggerboard trunk apart make certain you've got lots of photos and that you have thought through how you'd be putting it back together. Lugers were kit boats and someone might still have a set of plans if you need them. The company is long gone but an internet search might get you blueprints.
Depending on who put the boat together is the quality of fittings and fasteners you find. When you put things back in place make certain you use stainless or bronze and that way you'll never have to worry about rust.
kind regards,
Ok, mushy wood is not good. Thanks for posting the photos. Looks like a sweet boat. I'll take a closer look at the club's project the next time I'm at the beach and see if I can figure out the centerboard trunk construction.
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Old 02-07-2013, 20:45   #9
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Re: Luger Leeward restoration thread

Well I just accidentally deleted the photos I took this evening. I finished removing all of the wood, and began grinding out the old fiberglass. I set up fans blowing directly on the grinder, wore a mask, safety glasses, and hearing protection.
The boat is set up right inside a 14 foot square opening for ventilation. Pictures tomorrow! I've got lots of grinding to do yet!
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Old 02-07-2013, 20:58   #10
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Re: Luger Leeward restoration thread

Oh wait! I salvaged two pics.






Yes, some moron put the drain plug an inch off of the bottom......more on that later.
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Old 03-07-2013, 21:36   #11
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Re: Luger Leeward Restoration Thread

OK time for some general questions. I really would appreciate all input in these matters, to help me make an informed decision.

First off, are the wooden deck stringers structural, or only there to provide an attachment point for the decking boards? The reason I ask is I hate the idea of the decking. If I've got decking screwed down, then I've got a fiberglass hull that I can't get to, to clean and inspect regularly. The IDEA of this is not particularly pleasing. I do not have experience with decking over the hull, so enlighten me.
Am I making this too difficult, or is this a legitimate concern?
I like the idea of an open hull with no decking, but I don't know if the hull is made for that. I.E. are the deck stringers structural?

On a side note here, I do realize that I do have to have a support system for the centerboard housing.

My second question is fiberglass!
I was thinking about getting 1.5 oz chopped strand matting for base layers. I also heard it is good for top layers because it sands better. Is this a good plan?

I was thinking some sort of 18 or 24 oz woven roving for strength....the core layer between the chopped strand matting layers. Is this a good plan and if so, which weight should I get?

Perhaps a repair list will assist you fiberglass experts.

New deck stringers will need fiberglass. The rudder support board, motor mount support, chain plate supports, and the centerboard will all need to be replaced and fiberglassed. All of these pieces appear to have been glassed in with just the chopped strand matting. Should I stick with that method?
The last repair piece is the front area where the fore stay attaches. The fiberglass here has been broken and a poor repair job made. It needs to be cut, taper ground, and several layers built up to match the rest of the hull. I am assuming I have to have something more here for strength. What I've seen done is a core layer of the chopped strand matting, then the woven glass, and a layer of chopped strand on top to finish. Is this a good plan?

I was thinking of purchasing a general purpose epoxy resin. Would this be the best idea for an amiture?

Finally, I've been looking at Merton's fiberglass as a source to purchase glass and epoxy resin from. Here is a link and you can see the materials I have been referring to, on their site.

Merton's Fiberglass & Marine Supply

Is the Systems Three general purpose epoxy resin a reputable name? Are these good quality glass and resin products? What is your recommendation of product and source?

Thanks to all for your time, and I'd really appreciate all of your input.
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Old 03-07-2013, 23:32   #12
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Re: Luger Leeward Restoration Thread

Lots of questions so I'll go one at a time:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Custer View Post
OK time for some general questions. I really would appreciate all input in these matters, to help me make an informed decision.

First off, are the wooden deck stringers structural, or only there to provide an attachment point for the decking boards? The reason I ask is I hate the idea of the decking. If I've got decking screwed down, then I've got a fiberglass hull that I can't get to, to clean and inspect regularly. The IDEA of this is not particularly pleasing. I do not have experience with decking over the hull, so enlighten me.
Am I making this too difficult, or is this a legitimate concern?
I like the idea of an open hull with no decking, but I don't know if the hull is made for that. I.E. are the deck stringers structural?

The deck stringers are there to stiffen the hull and also to attach a cabin sole to if that is what you want to do. Make certain what you use as a fastener can also be removed easily and that way you can take up the sole to clean. You could also have a sole that is free floating but if you get swamped it'll be just that, free floating. Best to put a couple of screws in it. Where you want to use a screw, drill out larger, fill with epoxy and then drill the size of the screw so that freshwater doesn't sit in the wood and cause dry rot.

On a side note here, I do realize that I do have to have a support system for the centerboard housing.

My second question is fiberglass!
I was thinking about getting 1.5 oz chopped strand matting for base layers. I also heard it is good for top layers because it sands better. Is this a good plan?

You will not be building up thick layers so I would go with alternate layers of mat, roving, mat, then glass cloth as your last layer. It is much cleaner and easier to fair. Mat adheres better. Cloth finishes better. Cloth and roving have more strength than mat.

I was thinking some sort of 18 or 24 oz woven roving for strength....the core layer between the chopped strand matting layers. Is this a good plan and if so, which weight should I get?

Perhaps a repair list will assist you fiberglass experts.

New deck stringers will need fiberglass. The rudder support board, motor mount support, chain plate supports, and the centerboard will all need to be replaced and fiberglassed. All of these pieces appear to have been glassed in with just the chopped strand matting. Should I stick with that method?
The last repair piece is the front area where the fore stay attaches. The fiberglass here has been broken and a poor repair job made. It needs to be cut, taper ground, and several layers built up to match the rest of the hull. I am assuming I have to have something more here for strength. What I've seen done is a core layer of the chopped strand matting, then the woven glass, and a layer of chopped strand on top to finish. Is this a good plan?

I was thinking of purchasing a general purpose epoxy resin. Would this be the best idea for an amiture?

Yes on the general purpose epoxy resin and System Three is very good but a bit on the expensive side.

Finally, I've been looking at Merton's fiberglass as a source to purchase glass and epoxy resin from. Here is a link and you can see the materials I have been referring to, on their site.

Merton's Fiberglass & Marine Supply

Is the Systems Three general purpose epoxy resin a reputable name? Are these good quality glass and resin products? What is your recommendation of product and source?

Thanks to all for your time, and I'd really appreciate all of your input.
A couple of books that would be helpful are "This old Boat" and "The Fiberglass Boat Repair Manual." Remember that new technologies and systems for fiberglass repair have grown recently and it would be good to study the newest of books on the subject.

kind regards,
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Old 04-07-2013, 00:35   #13
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Re: Luger Leeward Restoration Thread

Welcome to the forum...Great project...sail on!
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Old 04-07-2013, 07:34   #14
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Re: Luger Leeward Restoration Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiprJohn View Post
Lots of questions so I'll go one at a time:



A couple of books that would be helpful are "This old Boat" and "The Fiberglass Boat Repair Manual." Remember that new technologies and systems for fiberglass repair have grown recently and it would be good to study the newest of books on the subject.

kind regards,


I'll get them ordered today!
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Old 04-07-2013, 09:50   #15
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Re: Luger Leeward Restoration Thread

i would not worry too much about replacing the stiffners as they were probably only for attaching the flooring to,assuming the hull layup is of a suitable thickness.

the center board casing will definitly require some cross bracing.

you might want to replace the heavy foam bouyancy with,water tight seats in the back,and a water tight compartment in the cuddy.

polyester resin will work if area to be worked on is ground out throughly,though epoxy works better if there is a lot of humidity,slower to work with and a lot more expensive,but 100% bonding is more or less guarenteed,also care is needed as epoxy is nasty stuff if in skin contact or inhalation.

fitting a drain plug near the center board is a better idea if the boat is stored not under cover on the hard.

biaxial cloth is easier to work with than woven rovings,though for a small boat like yours csm alone is probably sufficent.

if using epoxy use collodial silicon and microlite fillers for filleting and filling,adds enourmous amount of strenth to bonds.

another tip,tape off all your topside gelcoated surfaces with plastic and cardboard,will save a lot of work later cleaning up spills and dings,grinder marks and sticky fingers!
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