Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 06-03-2009, 01:19   #1
Registered User
 
Cowboy Sailer's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: on the boat. Gulf Coast
Boat: C&C 38'
Posts: 351
Images: 2
Long term storage effects

I have a question for sailors that live in a climate that is cold enough that boats are hauled out and stored for the winter.

If for some reason the boat was left in storage for a 3-year period what would that do to the engine? What about the other systems on board?
I can imagine that the type and condition of storage has a big impact on the boat’s condition. What is the best way to store a boat thru the winter in Massachusetts? What about storage outside; what is the best way to do that?

What is the biggest problem with long term storage?
__________________

__________________
Jerry and Denver
Happy Old cruisers!
Cowboy Sailer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2009, 01:49   #2
Registered User
 
Hampus's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Sweden
Boat: Between boats
Posts: 463
Images: 6
Send a message via MSN to Hampus
Engines are generally no problem, just make sure there's enough anti freeze in the system. Also run through the salt water cooling system with fresh water and anti freeze after you hauled it out. make sure the oil is changed. Water tanks, holding tanks, hoses, heads should be emptied of water. In short, anything that could freeze should be dry. If you see a lot of temperature differences, and we do here in Sweden, you should make sure the ventilation is good and also use dehumidifiers. Covering the boat will go a long way to keep it fresh, although sun will cause far more damage to a deck (teak) than snow and rain will. More sensitive types of wood will rot easily if covered by snow for extended periods of time, especially if it's close to freezing point and the snow is wet. If you keep the boat in rural areas or near a large road, it will get really dirty, and will be surprisingly hard to clean after a few years. Otherwise, I'd prefer storing my boat in a cold climate rather than in a hot sunny one. Sun is worse than snow... Hmmmm, that came out wrong
__________________

__________________
http://adventureswithsyingeborg.blogspot.com/
On the way back to Sweden.
Hampus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2009, 20:01   #3
Registered User
 
SabreKai's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Toronto, Canada on Lake Ontario
Boat: Roberts Offshore 38
Posts: 1,287
Images: 5
My boat was stored for about 3-5years before I got hold of her. She was stored with the mast up, so all the running rigging was history. Worse, the furling gear was still up, and wind vibration caused the mainsail furling to give way at the top end, and come crashing down. Given the forestay was the same vintage and no parts available, I replaced both.

As for the engine, it was in great shape. Started right up with a huge puff of smoke then ran fine. Apparently the owner did come done periodicly and turn the motor over by hand and put more antifreeze in the systems.

Water system was emptied and partly filled with antifreeze, and the pressure system was filled as well. The head tank was emptied and partly filled.

Both batteries were reading 12.45 volts in the dead of winter, so he must have been keeping them up, although its possible he replaced them both before selling the boat. I can't find any date stamps on them so its hard to tell.

Interiorwise, the cushions were clean and only slightly damp but they are also moldy. Im replacing them in stages. All the lockers were open, and there was only a bit of mold in one. The boat was keep shut up all the time with no cover of any sort. I guess he came down in the spring and aired her out, then shut her up again.

This winter, I've winterized the engine, and water system. The mast is down, and wrapped up. Batteries were both charged at the end of october, and read 12.26 and 12.35 last month, when I put the charger on for a bit. Back up to 12.45-47. All the lockers are opened up, and the forward 2 ports on either side are open with a tarp over the deck at that point. Good airflow. I had originally closed her up completely, but found that the inside surfaces were very damp to dripping wet due to heavy condensation, so I opened the ports and rigged the tarp to keep snow out. Worked ok.

Next winter I intend to build a greenhouse over the cockpit and aft part of the cabin, about 13-14 feet long, This way I'll be able to keep snow out of the cockpit, and allow the main hatch to be cracked open, and also the galley overhead. I am replacing the head mushroom vent and the hanging locker mushroom vent with a large diameter solar powered intake/extraction fan. These will be exposed to open air and should help with the condensation problem.

Sabre
__________________
SabreKai
SV Sabre Dance, Roberts Offshore 38
http://sabredancing.wordpress.com/
SabreKai is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2009, 22:06   #4
Registered User
 
Cowboy Sailer's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: on the boat. Gulf Coast
Boat: C&C 38'
Posts: 351
Images: 2
Thanks, Sabre Dance and Hampus.
That was the kind of information that I needed. Those of us in the far South have never winterized a boat. We just use them! I know, it's a tough job but we have to do it!
I see that there is a real differance in storage outside in the wind and indoors with the mast down. I would not have known that. I see now that there is more to it than just temperature and precipitation.
Do most people keep electricity to the boat with a dehumidifier running? What about water running down the mast into the bilges? If left outside, do the batteries need to be taken indoors?
Help this poor ole Southern boy out. It has been 10 years since I have experienced snow. By the way, I don't own a heavy coat.
Peace and blessings,
Jerry
__________________
Jerry and Denver
Happy Old cruisers!
Cowboy Sailer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2009, 06:02   #5
Do… or do not
 
s/v Jedi's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: in paradise
Boat: Sundeer 64
Posts: 9,198
A long time ago, when winters in Holland were still very cold, we used to run the diesel engine on a special preserving oil (instead of diesel) for 10 minutes or so before shutting it down for the winter. This was sold in 1 liter cans. The seacock was closed and a water+anti-freeze mixture poured into the seastrainer until it came out the exhaust at which time the engine was shut off.
We left the batteries in the boat once and had to buy new ones in the spring. Took them out after that but that would not be very handy with a big bank.... I think an electric heater would be better during freezing periods?

cheers,
Nick.
__________________
s/v Jedi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2009, 06:52   #6
Registered User
 
Exocet's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: 49-29 N, 124-44 W
Boat: Beneteau 305
Posts: 69
Do most people keep electricity to the boat with a dehumidifier running? What about water running down the mast into the bilges? If left outside, do the batteries need to be taken indoors?

Jerry[/quote]
To keep the cabin dry, instead of a dehumidifier (I'm knida cheap), I put on a 100 watt light bulb running 24/7. The heat from the light bulb keeps the interior nice and dry. If you have a really large boat (mine was 26 at the time), you may want to put in any extra light or two.If you put in a little heater to keep the boat dry, watch out not to have it too hot inside. If the boat is too warm, the snow on the deck will thaw and then freeze, leaving you with ice up to the toe-rails . As far as water running down the mast, a little bit of poly and some electrical tape ensured there was no leaks.
Anytime your boat is going to be put up for any length of time, its important to make sure the cockpit has a cover over it, and the cover should have enough pitch to shed the snow (now considering snow loads, make sure the cradle is very secure). Otherwise leaves and crap will block the drain, cockpit will fill with water to the point of spilling through into the companionway (sounds like I been there eh?). With leaves and such in mind, all scuppers should be looked at with this problem in mind. The last thing I would do is to open up a thru-hull to ensure any excess water that may bet inside, can get out. Make sure to fit some screen on the thru-hull to keep out little critters and bigger bugs.
Hope it all goes well.choa
__________________

__________________
Exocet is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Long-term Dry Storage chartertom General Sailing Forum 1 13-05-2009 07:31
Short-term Winter Storage, West Palm Area RBEmerson General Sailing Forum 5 11-02-2009 19:24
long Term Storage sjs Engines and Propulsion Systems 5 19-01-2007 13:46
Long term budget. Alan Wheeler General Sailing Forum 3 20-06-2005 11:16
Long Term Charter boatboys General Sailing Forum 0 03-06-2005 18:03



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:01.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.