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Old 29-05-2009, 07:28   #1
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Liners and Interior Work

I recently purchased an older Hunter 25'. The interior wood needs some care but all the lining has been removed. There is still 1/2" form on the overhead and along the sides that is in very good condition. I am thinking about using marine carpet to replace the liners but with the foam being in such good condition I was wondering if there might be an easier solution.

To install the marine grade carpet I would have to remove the foam insulation clean and prep the surface and then glue the carpet. I have not worked with replacing liners but from what I have researched so far that seems the easiest and fastest solution.

Anyone got other ideas or experience they can share?
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Old 29-05-2009, 07:56   #2
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Carpet will hold moisture, and become even heavier. I would think there is a better solution than carpet? I am sure there will be someone coming forward with an easier, and better material to work with......i2f
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Old 29-05-2009, 08:15   #3
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Quote:
Anyone got other ideas or experience they can share?
I would avoid materials that can hold moisture. Even if the carpet is marine grade it can support moisture and thus mold. You sure can't clean it easily once it is glued to the overhead.

Things glued in place just become a curse doomed to stay with the boat forever long after it has become tired, boring or moldy. A textured painted finish might be better looking and easy to clean. The traditional ahrdboard with teak strips and plugged screws always help sell a boat and is never glued in place.

I would avoid anything hard to replace later on.
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Old 29-05-2009, 08:27   #4
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On our Islander 30 we replaced the overhead by first removing the suspended ceiling. Gluing in insulation (we used the foil wrapped bubble stuff for hot water heaters etc. you can buy at Home Depot and there ilk). We then took door skins that I cut to fit the various areas my wife put a little foam on the skin then covered with vinyl. Instead of teak battens we used screws with a nylon washer that took a cap with matching vinyl. Worked well looked very professional and kept the boat warmer in the winter in the NW. Big advantage was that deck hardware was easily accessible the vinyl was easy to clean, and was something an amateur could do.
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Old 29-05-2009, 09:30   #5
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... Instead of teak battens we used screws with a nylon washer that took a cap with matching vinyl... .
Screws with Snap-Caps work well, as does Velcro.
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Old 29-05-2009, 09:37   #6
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Ray, I think one good solution is vinyl covered light boards, held in place by wooden batts (probably going athwartships) screwed to the deck or coachroof. It looks great and can be easily removed to get to hardware, etc.

I think Defender may sell something specifically for this purpose, so you might give them a call.
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Old 06-01-2012, 23:59   #7
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Re: Liners and Interior Work

Try again.. I know this is an old post but I've recently purchased a steel ketch. It had some plastic sheeting in the overhead similar to what is in caravans. I'm not sure I want to put it back in and so I'd like some ideas of what to replace it with. Should I use thin wooden planking? marine ply varnished? Any suggestions please? What is common. ted
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Old 07-01-2012, 01:04   #8
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Re: Liners and Interior Work

I used 6.5 mm pine ply in Boracay. Time consuming to do it piece by piece, but not mega expensive.

It does require a little more skill than I have to do it nicely though.

I bolted battens to the stringers and screwed the ply to them, trying to avoid the "machine gun" look.

I primed each piece and topcoated with marine gloss enamel. Tried ceiling white but not a good look.

I just upgraded the wiring for my solar panels and found the big advantage: I didn't have to tear my headlining apart.
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Old 07-01-2012, 01:11   #9
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Re: Liners and Interior Work

Currently looking at replacing a couple of interior headliners. Current plan is to wrap vinyl around ply and leave the screw heads visible as these panels will need to be removed to get to the back of the chainplates.
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Old 07-01-2012, 04:56   #10
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Currently looking at replacing a couple of interior headliners. Current plan is to wrap vinyl around ply and leave the screw heads visible as these panels will need to be removed to get to the back of the chainplates.
There are a couple of nice push and clip type fittings around now. Means you could avoid exposed screw heads but still have removable panels.

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Old 07-01-2012, 05:43   #11
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Re: Liners and Interior Work

Greetings and welcome aboard the CF, Ted.
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Old 07-01-2012, 17:59   #12
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Hi The reason for the foam was to provide an insulation layer between the hull and vinyl thus preventing condensation. If you intend sailing in a temperate climate you will need a foam layer. We're based in Ireland, so I know about damp. As was said forget carpet, with moisture you get mould and it's a lot easier to clean it of vinyl. If the foam is still good condition and not breaking up. then I would suggest either glue vinyl directly onto the foam or glue the vinyl onto light plywood strips and Velcro them on overhead. It's amazing the difference between a boat with an insulation layer and one without. If you need replacement foam, try a car upholster,they use light foam to replace head lining.
Regards Joe
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