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Old 17-09-2015, 09:01   #46
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Re: Lightweight but strong backing material

How about this stuff? They seem to have reasonable shipping.

ROYAL MARINE A-A FIR PLYWOOD from Aircraft Spruce
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Old 17-09-2015, 14:49   #47
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Re: Lightweight but strong backing material

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Originally Posted by zboss View Post
How about this stuff? They seem to have reasonable shipping.

ROYAL MARINE A-A FIR PLYWOOD from Aircraft Spruce
Looks good. Why not the Okume?
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Old 17-09-2015, 17:58   #48
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Re: Lightweight but strong backing material

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Looks good. Why not the Okume?
They don't have it in the thickness I need.
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Old 17-09-2015, 18:07   #49
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Re: Lightweight but strong backing material

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Originally Posted by zboss View Post
They don't have it in the thickness I need.
thought you were looking for 1/4"?

OKUME PLYWOOD 4 X 8 6MM 02-00076
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Old 17-09-2015, 18:22   #50
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Re: Lightweight but strong backing material

Read this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aucoumea_klaineana

Why I like Meranti better but having said that Okume is good as long as it's sealed.
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Old 17-09-2015, 18:58   #51
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Re: Lightweight but strong backing material

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Originally Posted by estarzinger View Post
thought you were looking for 1/4"?

OKUME PLYWOOD 4 X 8 6MM 02-00076
Actually I need something closer to 3/8... it's hard to tell with the rot.
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Old 17-09-2015, 19:56   #52
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Re: Lightweight but strong backing material

Okoume is my usual preference in Joubert plywood. Meranti is heavier. Very rarely do I use fir.
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Old 18-09-2015, 08:00   #53
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Re: Lightweight but strong backing material

Okoume is very flexible and needs to be encapsulated. It is used by the Outer Banks boatbuilders when they need to produce the pronounced "Carolina flare" hulls. Sepale and Maranti tropical wood marine plywood is very durable. Some builders in NC still use Douglas fir as it bends.

Pine is a soft, knotty wood. Not good.

I spoke with Scott Roberts of Roberts Plywood (a large northeast supplier to boat builders) regarding the glue issue. He said it is like answering "is there a difference between car brand quality or the quality of different producers of chicken? Would a good quality marine plywood use the same glue as a bad quality exterior plywood, no."

The tropical woods have less knots and a tighter grain. There are fewer voids, repairs, plugs, defects and patches in the plywood.

When water gets in a void and the temperature changes the trapped water expands and delaminates the plywood plies. The glue helps keep the plies from delaminating.

He said to look for the British stamp 1088 to be pretty sure you are getting good quality marine plywood with few voids, lots of plies of the same species without lots of interior repairs or patches.

Also regarding the glue, a lot of plywood comes from China. And you know how reliable they are about quality. They even falsely stamped a bunch of old flooring as being low formaldehyde and sent it to Lumber Liquidators- and they are now being sued.
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Old 18-09-2015, 13:30   #54
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Re: Lightweight but strong backing material

Well, a bunch of teak paneling is also rotted. Now thinking that in addition to the ply we need to replace the teak - some of it is so bad the bottom edges crumbled in my hand.

We are thinking about replacing it with something that is brighter like horizontal white bead board or something of that ilk. Even if we used molded bead board panels and encased in clear varnish - that would look pretty good and brighten up the cabin a bit.

I don't know how changing away from teak would affect the resale value of the boat. I guess on how good the install looks and the chosen materials. Maybe an exotic laminate would look nice.

I think we are going to end up in this boat for a good while with all the work we need to do!

Ideas?
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Old 18-09-2015, 13:48   #55
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Re: Lightweight but strong backing material

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...We are thinking about replacing it with something that is brighter like horizontal white bead board or something of that ilk. Even if we used molded bead board panels and encased in clear varnish - that would look pretty good and brighten up the cabin a bit.

I don't know how changing away from teak would affect the resale value of the boat...
Once you start deviating from what the original builder's work looked like, you immediately place your boat in the category: fixer-upper. If it's already beyond that category, then I wouldn't worry about it. But if it is yacht quality, don't go mixing and matching. This goes especially for mixing many kinds of wood. Don't do it.
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Old 18-09-2015, 14:26   #56
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Re: Lightweight but strong backing material

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Once you start deviating from what the original builder's work looked like, you immediately place your boat in the category: fixer-upper. If it's already beyond that category, then I wouldn't worry about it. But if it is yacht quality, don't go mixing and matching. This goes especially for mixing many kinds of wood. Don't do it.

I don't know about that. I've seen many 70's era boats with cheap wood grain Formica throughout that are greatly improved by simply painting them.

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Old 18-09-2015, 14:31   #57
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Re: Lightweight but strong backing material

The Cabo Rico is pretty dark inside with all that teak. I would want to lighten it with white painted wood/laminate anyway, and now, here is your opportunity

What material is your overhead? If laminate, replace with that.

Matt


Quote:
Originally Posted by zboss View Post
Well, a bunch of teak paneling is also rotted. Now thinking that in addition to the ply we need to replace the teak - some of it is so bad the bottom edges crumbled in my hand.

We are thinking about replacing it with something that is brighter like horizontal white bead board or something of that ilk. Even if we used molded bead board panels and encased in clear varnish - that would look pretty good and brighten up the cabin a bit.

I don't know how changing away from teak would affect the resale value of the boat. I guess on how good the install looks and the chosen materials. Maybe an exotic laminate would look nice.

I think we are going to end up in this boat for a good while with all the work we need to do!

Ideas?
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Old 19-09-2015, 00:12   #58
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Re: Lightweight but strong backing material

An opinion:

When you start letting worries about resale value drive your boating decisions, the tail is wagging the dog! Unless, of course, you are doing a fix-up and flip kina job...

It is you, not some as yet unborn future owner, who will be sailing the boat and living in it and so on. Worrying about the possible taste and opinions of someone who might be interested in buying your boat in the indeterminate future is a waste of time IMO.

So, if the teak trim is shot, and you think YOU would like a lighter coloured (and likely less expensive) cladding better, I'd say go for it. Who is to say that the future buyer might not agree with you?

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Old 19-09-2015, 10:20   #59
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Re: Lightweight but strong backing material

I recently bought 3/4" marine plywood at the Home Depot in Oak Harbor, WA. It is not cheap but also not hugely more costly than good quality exterior ply. I had to make several smaller panels out of a 4'x8' panel and I did not find any voids at cut edges. The store I normally go to did not have it so I used the HD website to search for it. Just FYI
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Old 19-09-2015, 11:14   #60
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Re: Lightweight but strong backing material

If that's your intent. Rot free low maintainence and brighter look then why not get tongue and groove pvc board and glue to cabin top sides with Epoxy? Would be easy.
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