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Old 01-12-2015, 12:32   #16
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Re: Lifting the mast?

I want to let everyone know who finds this thread that I am looking at both the options of lifting with and without the assistance of a crane. I still need to find more information before I make any decision but I am leaning towards having a crane assist me. Having the responsibility of my mast lift in the hands of someone who has done it before and not risking the bottom of my mast sliding off the bottle jack rig are both my main considerations. (That and she needs to go on the hard to get a bottom job anyway).

Thanks again for all that commented.
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Old 01-12-2015, 12:47   #17
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Re: Lifting the mast?

Maybe the yard will give you a two for one deal.
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Old 01-12-2015, 13:41   #18
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Re: Lifting the mast?

It looks like you've got a hinged
tabernacle?
Why not just build a gin pole and lower the mast?
Did it plenty on my friends S2 6.9
And my Mariner. Both these are smaller than yours but the theory
is the same,.
Google "Gin Pole"
Cheers
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Old 01-12-2015, 21:18   #19
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Re: Lifting the mast?

Obviously, you should only do what you're confident and comfortable with,
but your mast probably weighs only 150 lbs or so, most likely less.

If it were me, I'd pull the boom off, loosen all the shrouds, pull the pins on the tabernacle with the assistance of a friend and a small prybar, slide the mast forward onto a piece of plywood waiting on the deck, do my repairs, and slide it back when done. The mast hardly needs much lifting at all.
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Old 01-12-2015, 21:42   #20
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Re: Lifting the mast?

If it is really in a tabernacle, why not use that feature? Lower the mast to horizontal, shore up the far end, use some form of jack to support the butt, remove the pivot pin, raise the jack thus unloading the tabernacle and hence the step that it sits upon. Do y our repairs, reverse the process.

If it isn't a tabernacle, Jim Bunyards advice above still applies as a reasonable approach IMO.

At any rate, hope you find a useful and inexpensive solution to your problem.

Jim
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Old 02-12-2015, 05:19   #21
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Re: Lifting the mast?

According to the other posts his mast step doesn't have any nuts on the backside, not sure I'd be trusting that dropping the mast. The nuts are one of the reasons he needs to drop the mast, can't get to the bolt heads.
I still say have the mast craned off do all you interior (compression post) and exterior work then re-step the mast after the repairs are ALL done.
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Old 02-12-2015, 10:29   #22
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Re: Lifting the mast?

That DIY mast lifting project posted was a reckless stunt that would never be allowed in our marina. Surprised at how many here think this is a reasonable way to try to save ~$200.

Don't be "that guy". Get the yard to lift your mast.
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Old 03-12-2015, 01:51   #23
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Re: Lifting the mast?

Unlikely to weigh more than 150 lb.
Couple of strong guys, hydraulic jacks, lifting legs, park under a bridge 😃, wedges and levers. All possible. Just think carefully and have back up plan.


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Old 03-12-2015, 02:42   #24
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Re: Lifting the mast?

Quote:
Originally Posted by stillbuilding View Post
Unlikely to weigh more than 150 lb.
Couple of strong guys, hydraulic jacks, lifting legs, park under a bridge ��, wedges and levers. All possible. Just think carefully and have back up plan.


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Tell me how the moment of a 150lb on a 30' arm compares to a 300lb load on a 2' arm. The second it gets out of plumb, things can go to turd real quick. (plus you forgot the downward force generated by the stays which can be several times the dead load of the mast.)

Masts aren't typically very heavy. It's the length and orientation that makes it tricky.
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Old 03-12-2015, 04:14   #25
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Re: Lifting the mast?

Played with a couple so understand the issues.😃

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Old 03-12-2015, 04:39   #26
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Re: Lifting the mast?

Dum2 - Cruisers & Sailing Photo Gallery

This is a picture of the inside of his boat showing the mast step being held in by nothing so to speak, he can't get to the heads of the bolts because the mast is in the way.
Do you really think letting the mast drop without a crane is safe? What happens when the weight goes back and starts lifting the mast step off the deck?
You could get some washers and nuts on there but it still wouldn't be tight. But at least it won't come flying up possibly hitting someone helping.
Boats cost $ and 200$ is nothing compared to what could happen in this situation.
In my books it's always better to be safe than cheap, cheap usually costs more in the long run anyway.
At least once you have the step properly bolted down and the compression post fixed you won't need the crane to step the mast again. So it is only a one time expense.
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Old 03-12-2015, 07:55   #27
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Re: Lifting the mast?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Terra Nova View Post
That DIY mast lifting project posted was a reckless stunt that would never be allowed in our marina. Surprised at how many here think this is a reasonable way to try to save ~$200.

Don't be "that guy". Get the yard to lift your mast.
For me, it's not about saving 200.00 (would be more like 300+ where live) but expediency. I'd be done with it before the guys with the crane even show up. IF OP isn't comfortable with it he shouldn't try it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by valhalla360 View Post
Tell me how the moment of a 150lb on a 30' arm compares to a 300lb load on a 2' arm. The second it gets out of plumb, things can go to turd real quick. (plus you forgot the downward force generated by the stays which can be several times the dead load of the mast.)

Masts aren't typically very heavy. It's the length and orientation that makes it tricky.
If he does it right the mast never gets enough out of plumb to matter. See my post above...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Siberianhusky View Post
Dum2 - Cruisers & Sailing Photo Gallery

This is a picture of the inside of his boat showing the mast step being held in by nothing so to speak, he can't get to the heads of the bolts because the mast is in the way.
Do you really think letting the mast drop without a crane is safe? What happens when the weight goes back and starts lifting the mast step off the deck?
You could get some washers and nuts on there but it still wouldn't be tight. But at least it won't come flying up possibly hitting someone helping.
Boats cost $ and 200$ is nothing compared to what could happen in this situation.
In my books it's always better to be safe than cheap, cheap usually costs more in the long run anyway.
At least once you have the step properly bolted down and the compression post fixed you won't need the crane to step the mast again. So it is only a one time expense.
In my book, safe and cheap is best of all. Do you really think a 150 lb spear swinging relatively freely above a boat is safer than a mast sitting on a deck, loose at the bottom, but held by 7 or 8 stays at the top? The size and number of the pins in the OPs' picture should tell you something about the side loads (or lack of them) involved at the base of the mast with a boat at rest...

And yes, I am, as Terra Nova suggests, one of 'those guys'. In the picture below, you can see my boat, sans mast (43', keel stepped, probably 250 lbs with shrouds and winches), along with the 'crane' I pulled it out with, alone, made from sixteen foot 2"x6"s (salvaged from a hard pool cover), a used boat trailer winch (from a previous job) and some lag bolts and deck screws (new, but leftover from previous jobs). Total cost: 9.00 for 60' of new 1/4" galvanized cable for the winch (don't want to take any unnecessary chances). Saved the money (and the trip to the yard) for the crane, plus was able to work on the mast and deck at mine and the weathers' leisure. I was luckily able to get some assistance restepping it, saving a whole bunch of trips up and down those steps.
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Old 03-12-2015, 08:45   #28
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Re: Lifting the mast?

Well done.


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Old 03-12-2015, 14:29   #29
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Re: Lifting the mast?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Siberianhusky View Post
Dum2 - Cruisers & Sailing Photo Gallery

This is a picture of the inside of his boat showing the mast step being held in by nothing so to speak, he can't get to the heads of the bolts because the mast is in the way.
Do you really think letting the mast drop without a crane is safe? What happens when the weight goes back and starts lifting the mast step off the deck?
You could get some washers and nuts on there but it still wouldn't be tight. But at least it won't come flying up possibly hitting someone helping.
Boats cost $ and 200$ is nothing compared to what could happen in this situation.
In my books it's always better to be safe than cheap, cheap usually costs more in the long run anyway.
At least once you have the step properly bolted down and the compression post fixed you won't need the crane to step the mast again. So it is only a one time expense.
Just looked at all the pics
How about this
Slip a washer on the bolt
Gripwith vise grips right under it
Add enough washers at least to width
Of the vise grips
Thread on a nut at least to point
Where you could get the vise grips on the bottom of the bolt
Remove vise grips from the top of the bolt, move to the bottom below the nut and then use an open ended wrench to tighten the nut
The stack of washers take up the spot on the bolt just bunged up by the
Vise grips. Then just lower the mast with a gin pole
Reverse the process to remove the bolts Make whatever repairs needed
Rebolt the tabernacle with new hardware

Cheers
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Old 03-12-2015, 15:19   #30
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Re: Lifting the mast?

Quote:
Originally Posted by steamgoat View Post
Also,that is a keel stepped mast,yours is deck stepped,however,with a bit of caution,i'm sure you can do it !!

It becomes a significantly different problem when it is deck-stepped!!!

In the keel stepped case, all they need to worry about is 1 dimension of motion. In the deck stepped case, you've got to worry about all 3.

Good luck, but I'd just get the crane!!!
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