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Old 09-08-2011, 12:04   #31
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Re: Is Age a Factor in the Seaworthiness of a Glass Hull ?

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Originally Posted by VirtualVagabond View Post
Just a few thoughts...
You are right, Rob Legg is well regarded for his designs and boat quality. The RL 24 particularly. He also built the RL28 and RL34, which at the time was the biggest trailer sailer in Australia. Because of the need to keep the width narrow enough to be legal to tow, they ended up as a bit of a compromise I didn't really like. They also had to be a light lay up to be towable by a family sedan... the 24 and 28. The 34 needed a bit more grunt and were usually behind a 4WD or F250.

The RL 28 was quite popular with hire fleets, so although built to survey, some of them were knocked about.

I only ever sailed on one, and it was a swing keel, not the fixed keel version. I felt it was very tender and way too lightly built for anything other than a weekend trailer sailer, which is what it was designed to be. I certainly wouldn't want to be in it in a big chop or blow.

IMO it would be a big mistake to compare it with the heavy displacement glass boats being built in the 70s and 80s, before accountants got involved and worked out just how little GRP you could get away with.

I would never consider the RL 28 to be a serious liveaboard cruiser.

Now that's got to worth at least 2c!
Could be worth a lot more, in hindsight if I were to buy too light a boat, bang into a reef, and put a whole in it : ) Thanks for your 2 cents.

If I buy an Rl28, the boat will be used for coastal cruising and island hpping, in mostly light air conditions. I won't be putting the boat's crusing limitations to the test - at least, not intentionally.

Best regards.

G2L
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Old 09-08-2011, 12:08   #32
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Re: Is Age a Factor in the Seaworthiness of a Glass Hull ?

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Originally Posted by smurphny View Post
As in generally misunderstood building construction moisture technology, the moisture that creates problems is molecular moisture, the kind that goes right through all kinds of materials (steel, concrete, etc.), not water per se. With fiberglass, any microscopic void area will collect water through condensation inside due to temperature differentials in both directions. Warm will always move to cold, it's moisture content with it, and at some point inside the glass, condensation will form. This kind of infiltration can accumulate rather quickly and then take months to dissipate during which time it may go through freeze/thaw cycles, increasing in volume on the freezes. Burst water pipes experience the same phenomena.
Good point smurf.

Thanks,

G2L
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