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Old 18-06-2017, 11:04   #1
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Interior Help

We just purchased a 1985 36' Hunter. We have several projects I want to get done prior to splash. My biggest quandary at the moment is this; the interior hull walls are currently covered in a weird flocked fabric that is beyond disgusting. I want to recover all the areas. Any thoughts? Suggestions? Ps.... I'm a complete sailing newbie.... so please be nice

Kim
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Old 18-06-2017, 12:34   #2
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Re: Interior Help

What you are calling the "walls" is actually called the ceiling in a boat. How about stripping it off and replacing it with it with a fabric you like. Use spray on contact cement for headliners
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Old 18-06-2017, 12:37   #3
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Re: Interior Help

Peel it off carefully so as to have a pattern. It is called Hull Liner and is relatively cheap from any marine upholstery shop. Use the old one as pattern and use spray contact cement (nasty stuff) to bod on the new.
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Old 18-06-2017, 12:39   #4
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Re: Interior Help

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Originally Posted by Guy View Post
What you are calling the "walls" is actually called the ceiling in a boat. How about stripping it off and replacing it with it with a fabric you like. Use spray on contact cement for headliners


So, the ceiling isn't the ceiling?? It's the walls? The curved sides of the boat? Then what do you call the actual ceiling? Where the hatches are? I'm looking for something a little more upscale. I've though about doing a lightweight vinyl, lightly padded with decorative buttons. I'm just not sure how to go about doing that or if I even could....
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Old 18-06-2017, 12:54   #5
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Re: Interior Help

If the yucky stuff is well-bonded to the hull, I would be tempted to leave it in place. It will provide some insulation (always a good thing) and likely be a real PITA to remove.

There are a number of spray-on upholstery adhesives. While contact cement (also available as spray-on) will work, it is very unforgiving. I would look for an adhesive that gives you some ability to shift the new material to effect a really good positioning.

Depending on your specific situation, you may need to make a pattern, wide butcher or packing paper works well for this. You might get away with simply using slightly oversize fabric (cloth, vinyl, whatever) and trim to the final shape after gluing. All depends on complexity, fabric thickness, your competence, etc.etc.

Try a small less-noticeable section first and don't be afraid to spend a few dollars more on failed experiments.

Sit back, have a beer, glass of wine or other favorite indulgence in the salon and consider your alternatives.

It will be worth it in the long run.
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Old 18-06-2017, 13:05   #6
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Re: Interior Help

Sailrite has cabin liner with a foam backing. I am considering using their headliner that is attached with 3M spray adhesive.
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Old 18-06-2017, 15:35   #7
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Re: Interior Help

flblowfish,

I'd have a concern about your tuck 'n' roll concept, i would think that all around the buttons you'll have to clean frequently with vinegar to inhibit mold. Our upholstery buttons collect dust, which traps moisture, and so on.

I would be tempted to have timber ceilings cut for the hull "walls", plan on spacing them about two widths apart, so if they are 2" wide, have them 4" from each other. Varnish them, sanding the corners to round (radius) them a bit. Remove the fuzzy stuff. Clean and then, paint the surface with some scrubbable paint, let it cure, then bond in the varnished timber. It can look good, and is easy to just wipe clean.

One of the advantages to this approach is that you won't have to mess with liners any more.

Something you can do if you have exposed wires after removing lining, is to buy teak channel, sand and varnish, and cover most of the length of the run. We did this on one boat, and you soon stop thinking it looks unfinished. Timber trim, varnished, looks good. In a humid climate, it is way better (imho) than oiling it, because mold likes to feed on the oil.

The underneath of the cabin top, where there are opening hatches, is called "the overhead," and the "floor" is the "cabin sole."

Ann
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Old 18-06-2017, 15:45   #8
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Re: Interior Help

Quote:
Originally Posted by jamhass View Post
If the yucky stuff is well-bonded to the hull, I would be tempted to leave it in place. It will provide some insulation (always a good thing) and likely be a real PITA to remove.

There are a number of spray-on upholstery adhesives. While contact cement (also available as spray-on) will work, it is very unforgiving. I would look for an adhesive that gives you some ability to shift the new material to effect a really good positioning.

Depending on your specific situation, you may need to make a pattern, wide butcher or packing paper works well for this. You might get away with simply using slightly oversize fabric (cloth, vinyl, whatever) and trim to the final shape after gluing. All depends on complexity, fabric thickness, your competence, etc.etc.

Try a small less-noticeable section first and don't be afraid to spend a few dollars more on failed experiments.

Sit back, have a beer, glass of wine or other favorite indulgence in the salon and consider your alternatives.

It will be worth it in the long run.


I am really tempted to just leave it. Wipe it clean with light bleach solution before installing anything over it. I'm actually a licensed interior designer but I have no experience with anything marine other than making a few cushions for a client with a multi million dollar yacht.

If I sit down in this salon before some of this stuff is done, I will run from all this screaming! Lol
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Old 18-06-2017, 15:47   #9
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Re: Interior Help

Quote:
Originally Posted by maxingout View Post
Sailrite has cabin liner with a foam backing. I am considering using their headliner that is attached with 3M spray adhesive.


Thanks! I just emailed them with questions. What 3M adhesive would you recommend?

I'm SERIOUSLY thinking about leaving what's on there, wiping it down with a light bleach solution and installing the new stuff right on top of it.
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Old 18-06-2017, 15:52   #10
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Re: Interior Help

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Originally Posted by JPA Cate View Post
flblowfish,

I'd have a concern about your tuck 'n' roll concept, i would think that all around the buttons you'll have to clean frequently with vinegar to inhibit mold. Our upholstery buttons collect dust, which traps moisture, and so on.

I would be tempted to have timber ceilings cut for the hull "walls", plan on spacing them about two widths apart, so if they are 2" wide, have them 4" from each other. Varnish them, sanding the corners to round (radius) them a bit. Remove the fuzzy stuff. Clean and then, paint the surface with some scrubbable paint, let it cure, then bond in the varnished timber. It can look good, and is easy to just wipe clean.

One of the advantages to this approach is that you won't have to mess with liners any more.

Something you can do if you have exposed wires after removing lining, is to buy teak channel, sand and varnish, and cover most of the length of the run. We did this on one boat, and you soon stop thinking it looks unfinished. Timber trim, varnished, looks good. In a humid climate, it is way better (imho) than oiling it, because mold likes to feed on the oil.

The underneath of the cabin top, where there are opening hatches, is called "the overhead," and the "floor" is the "cabin sole."

Ann


Ann,

Have you seen or experienced the fake teak? I think it might work on the walls. BUT... that is what we are putting on the cabin sole throughout the boat.

I'm actually a licensed interior designer but have NO experience with anything marine other than a few cushions on a mega yacht.

Mold is a huge concern for me as I am highly sensitive to it. So no tufted buttons! Thank you!

Kim
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Old 18-06-2017, 16:10   #11
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Re: Interior Help

Hi, Kim,

My sister-in-law is sensitive to molds. Before she came to visit, we wiped down every corner, every inch of the boat we could reach, with a mild bleach solution. Don't know if that is necessary in FL, but I suspect it might be. You could hire a cleaning service to do it for you if you develop symptoms.

Ann
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Old 18-06-2017, 16:15   #12
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Re: Interior Help

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Originally Posted by JPA Cate View Post
Hi, Kim,

My sister-in-law is sensitive to molds. Before she came to visit, we wiped down every corner, every inch of the boat we could reach, with a mild bleach solution. Don't know if that is necessary in FL, but I suspect it might be. You could hire a cleaning service to do it for you if you develop symptoms.

Ann

Ann,

I will be cleaning everything I can reach with a light dawn/bleach solution. All of the cushions are being replaced. Our mattress is being replaced. But I'm washing down all of the support boards, inside of all of the storage places, etc.

Everything that doesn't move grows mold in Florida! I swear if I stood still long enough, I would grow mold! Lol

Kim
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Old 18-06-2017, 16:38   #13
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Re: Interior Help

Quote:
Originally Posted by flblowfish View Post
We just purchased a 1985 36' Hunter. We have several projects I want to get done prior to splash. My biggest quandary at the moment is this; the interior hull walls are currently covered in a weird flocked fabric that is beyond disgusting. I want to recover all the areas. Any thoughts? Suggestions? Ps.... I'm a complete sailing newbie.... so please be nice

Kim
Howdy Kim.

You will get many opinions, and some of that is because interior design is a matter of taste.

I happen to like "light" white colored interiors on boats.

So, I would consider putting some white surface there to make the interior lighter in color/tone and to reflect light.

Some boats have had white (or natural or varnished wood) "bead board" type grooved thin panels installed in them, and they can look nice.

Some boats have carpet installed on the ceilings (walls to landlubbers) and I have never seen any I liked. To me, they look like dirt catchers and mold and mildew breeding grounds.

By the way, that surface that is over your head in a boat is NOT a ceiling, it is called an "overhead."

I am also allergic to molds. So, I would prefer the interior hard surfaces to be easy to clean. I would use fabric pillows for "soft" areas where the body may come in contact with the hull when the boat is heeled if it is in a berth (where people sleep).

I have seen a modern fiberglass hull boat that had cedar planks installed on the ceilings (walls) in the cabin. It looked nice. Those are THIN planks or strips or panels. It changed the atmosphere visually, and you can smell the cedar (naturally).

And some like to use Mahogany Luan panels (very thin panels) that can be curved (and purchased at a DIY Home Store) .

Be aware that IF you convert your interior to something unusual, it may affect the selling price later (for better or worse).

Good luck and I hope this helps.
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Old 18-06-2017, 17:01   #14
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Re: Interior Help

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Originally Posted by Steady Hand View Post
Howdy Kim.



You will get many opinions, and some of that is because interior design is a matter of taste.



I happen to like "light" white colored interiors on boats.



So, I would consider putting some white surface there to make the interior lighter in color/tone and to reflect light.



Some boats have had white (or natural or varnished wood) "bead board" type grooved thin panels installed in them, and they can look nice.



Some boats have carpet installed on the ceilings (walls to landlubbers) and I have never seen any I liked. To me, they look like dirt catchers and mold and mildew breeding grounds.



By the way, that surface that is over your head in a boat is NOT a ceiling, it is called an "overhead."



I am also allergic to molds. So, I would prefer the interior hard surfaces to be easy to clean. I would use fabric pillows for "soft" areas where the body may come in contact with the hull when the boat is heeled if it is in a berth (where people sleep).



I have seen a modern fiberglass hull boat that had cedar planks installed on the ceilings (walls) in the cabin. It looked nice. Those are THIN planks or strips or panels. It changed the atmosphere visually, and you can smell the cedar (naturally).



And some like to use Mahogany Luan panels (very thin panels) that can be curved (and purchased at a DIY Home Store) .



Be aware that IF you convert your interior to something unusual, it may affect the selling price later (for better or worse).



Good luck and I hope this helps.


Howdy!

YES YES and YES!!!! THIS is exactly something I would LOVE on the ceilings! It can be wiped down and adds a designer touch! Ok.... the mahogany panels ..... any DIY store? Can it be painted? Any SPECIFIC paint to discourage mold? And just a thought, I cannot install this myself. So, any suggestions for the Ft Pierce, FL area for installation? I can paint it.... just need it cut and installed.

Thank you sooo very much!!!

Kim
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Old 18-06-2017, 17:09   #15
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Re: Interior Help

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steady Hand View Post
Howdy Kim.



You will get many opinions, and some of that is because interior design is a matter of taste.



I happen to like "light" white colored interiors on boats.



So, I would consider putting some white surface there to make the interior lighter in color/tone and to reflect light.



Some boats have had white (or natural or varnished wood) "bead board" type grooved thin panels installed in them, and they can look nice.



Some boats have carpet installed on the ceilings (walls to landlubbers) and I have never seen any I liked. To me, they look like dirt catchers and mold and mildew breeding grounds.



By the way, that surface that is over your head in a boat is NOT a ceiling, it is called an "overhead."



I am also allergic to molds. So, I would prefer the interior hard surfaces to be easy to clean. I would use fabric pillows for "soft" areas where the body may come in contact with the hull when the boat is heeled if it is in a berth (where people sleep).



I have seen a modern fiberglass hull boat that had cedar planks installed on the ceilings (walls) in the cabin. It looked nice. Those are THIN planks or strips or panels. It changed the atmosphere visually, and you can smell the cedar (naturally).



And some like to use Mahogany Luan panels (very thin panels) that can be curved (and purchased at a DIY Home Store) .



Be aware that IF you convert your interior to something unusual, it may affect the selling price later (for better or worse).



Good luck and I hope this helps.


Howdy again!

One other question.... can this be installed OVER the current very thin fabric?!!

Thanks!
Kim
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