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Old 03-09-2013, 18:50   #1
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Insulated Window Material

Hello,

I need to replace most of my portlight glass due to simple age (glue bonding safety glass has turned brown) or cracks.

I want to replace the glass with the best insulated glass to keep the heat out or the heat in... what material would be the best choice?

Thanks,

Z
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Old 07-10-2013, 15:08   #2
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Re: Insulated Window Material

bump!
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Old 07-10-2013, 15:44   #3
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Re: Insulated Window Material

We were forced to buy insulated glass for a couple of windows in our house because of the configuration of the windows. Niether Heat nor A/C is needed or used here. All those windows need to be replaced because the seal has failed between the panes has failed. The windows are fogged so bad you can barely see out of them and they block so m,uch light have to turn lights on in the room in the middle of the day.

With the way a boat works, can imagine how many months a double pain window would go before the bond between the glass breaks down and needs to be replaced.
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Old 07-10-2013, 16:02   #4
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Originally Posted by roverhi View Post
We were forced to buy insulated glass for a couple of windows in our house because of the configuration of the windows. Niether Heat nor A/C is needed or used here. All those windows need to be replaced because the seal has failed between the panes has failed. The windows are fogged so bad you can barely see out of them and they block so m,uch light have to turn lights on in the room in the middle of the day.

With the way a boat works, can imagine how many months a double pain window would go before the bond between the glass breaks down and needs to be replaced.
Double glazed auto glass is available , v expensive in custom sizes. Household stuff would never survive.

Dave
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Old 07-10-2013, 16:45   #5
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Re: Insulated Window Material

So if you are not using an insulated window, what do you use to insulate during the winter? We have screens that we could take out and put in tight fitting reflex material or maybe pink insulation.
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Old 14-04-2015, 06:37   #6
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Re: Insulated Window Material

Insulated glass windows are made from ordinary plate glass. In the marine environment you should use tempered safety glass which is 4-5 times stronger, and if it breaks, it breaks into thousands of little pieces instead of big shards. Chances are that insulated glass will be too thick to fit your window frames as well. Just some thoughts.


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Old 14-04-2015, 06:53   #7
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Re: Insulated Window Material

My windows are 3/8th Perspex.

Given I live in Tasmania I don't think I loose that much heat and not much heat gets in during the summer. Mine are also coloured 'grey' Iraq thin, or could even be black.
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Old 14-04-2015, 07:02   #8
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Re: Insulated Window Material

When I owned a glass shop we made plexiglass inside storm windows that used a magnetic strip to hold them to the trim around the window. We put a thin metal strip on the trim with double sided tape. They are still available. They are called Magneitite. They are very good at insulating and stopping drafts.
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Old 14-04-2015, 07:02   #9
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Re: Insulated Window Material

Install high grade heat blocking window tint film on standard windows. Do a web search or find a tinting shop. Many commercial buildings are having this installed to cut down energy use.

You can get this film either tinted or essentially clear which is what you would want for any windows you need to see out of when underway.
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Old 14-04-2015, 09:28   #10
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Re: Insulated Window Material

Insulated? If you mean real thermal insulation it means double or triple glassed frame filled with argon gas. 15 to 25mm (5/8 to 1") thick. A good glass shop can make them any shape with whatever laminated, tempered, tinted glass you might want..
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Old 15-04-2015, 02:10   #11
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Re: Insulated Window Material

We live in northern Norway and during winter we put see through shrink wrap with double sided tape on the inside of the single pane glass windows. A hair dryer tightens the wrap so that you hardly see it. The windows should be clean and dry, otherwise you might get condensation in this "double pane" setup. That's cheap and works very well against inside condensation. After our 8 to 9 month winter period, there is some condensation starting on the inside, but then we remove the shrink wrap and everything is good again!
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Old 15-04-2015, 04:28   #12
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Re: Insulated Window Material

3M 62 in. x 84 in. Clear Plastic Indoor Window Kit-2120-EP - The Home Depot
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Old 15-04-2015, 05:19   #13
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Re: Insulated Window Material

I gather that they are opening type ports, given the description? If so, more often than not, they have a heavy (metal) ring, secured to the frame, which secures the glass, plus a gasket in place. And given that, it allows you to do a replacement yourself.

One option would be Lexan (Polycarbonate) with a scratch resistant finish. It's easy to work with, & the cost is moderate. Just remember to allow for thermal expansion when cutting it to size.

Choice #2 would be Acrylic. It's not as tough as Lexan, although the cost is less. And for smaller expanses of area, it typically does the job. Plus, with it, replacing the glass can be a DIY job as well.

Option #3 is tempered glass. It'll be the priciest, & very tough, assuming that you get the correct grade/type.
On this, you might need a bit of professional assistance, & or consultation. However, as they say, forewarned is forearmed. Meaning that it might pay (literally) to do some research into the various types of glass made, & of them, which are used, in what specific marine/maritime applications.

To this end, some of the info might be found in a thread on a similar topic made several weeks back. If you do a back search of my posts, it'll turn up.
And one of the great resources mentioned therein, is Professional Boatbuilder Magazine. Several years ago, they did a very lengthy, in depth article, on what the various types of glass that are made are. And of them, which are appropriate for which specific marine/maritime applications.
It (the article, & the magazine) are well worth the read. So I can't see as how contacting them would hurt, including, picking up a back issue of the month/year of that particular issue.

Ah, & if you're not getting the answers, & or ideas which you're seeking, or just want more info to have as a knowledge base on this topic. Ask some more targeted, & specific questions. In addition to posting some pics of the problem at hand. The latter usually helps a LOT.

- Oh, & on the insulation thing, there are a few more options. If you're looking for insulation only, to go along with some relatively inexpensive new glass. You can always just trim some closed cell foam to fit inside of the recesses of the frames, on top of the glass.
Or, you can secure some bubble pack in place, in the same location.
And if you're handy with tools, you can fabricate a wooden trim ring, to go around that of your ports. Routing into the frame, a rebate for a thing 1/8" piece of acrylic that you can affix with screws. Or some variation on this theme.

Good luck with the project!
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Old 15-04-2015, 05:28   #14
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Re: Insulated Window Material

What Cowboy sailor said; storm windows in the winter (on the inside), canvas external covers in the summer.


single piece double glazing seems very problematic.
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Old 15-04-2015, 06:30   #15
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Insulated Window Material

CARP!!!!! I've just responded to a two year dead thread!!!!


We've always lost more heat through the hull and deck than the ports......unless you gave a well insulated hull this may be true for you too.


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