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Old 13-07-2015, 09:35   #16
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Re: I have had it with towing the Dingy

A friend of mine does what Vasco suggests with a variation that solves the visibility issue. Once on board he deflates the dink and then ties it down. That might work for you.
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Old 13-07-2015, 09:36   #17
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Re: I have had it with towing the Dingy

Hey I've been lurking a while, but this topic directly affects me as I am preparing to put an offer on a big Hunter that comes with a davit, which I am not sure I like. Besides adding a few feet to the docked length of the boat (hence increased slip costs) I also enjoy the usual view out the back of the boat. With the aft cockpit of the Hunter, with the dingy stored on the davit, that means having that dingy in our face all the time.

What is every one else's experience with this?

Thank you
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Old 13-07-2015, 09:43   #18
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Re: I have had it with towing the Dingy

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Originally Posted by micah719 View Post
Can an upturned dinghy serve as a hard dodger?
ROTFL!!! I like how you think.
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Old 13-07-2015, 09:54   #19
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Re: I have had it with towing the Dingy

Seems a shame to carve up a pretty boat like that w 'carp' (new word for the day) on the stern. I strap a light weight, short, but beamy kayak on the foredeck. Takes two minutes to deploy; never had a problem and they're fun to run up on the beach. Mine has a second small seat forward that my wife can use for short runs, but I can easily fit another kayak on the foredeck, upside down / side by side the first w no interference w hatch or lines. I can also tow the second behind as a barge if/when the grocery/beer order gets excessive. They also have good-sized inflatables, but I like to keep it simple. Cheers, Pappy
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Old 13-07-2015, 09:57   #20
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Re: I have had it with towing the Dingy

...a simple elegant solution...

Well, simple anyway:
With the exception of charter boats everywhere (hey, it's not their dink, so why worry about the long-term?) we've noticed that the 'towed dinghy', usually with the outboard fitted, which we find even scarier, is far more prevalent on the western side of the Atlantic than on the east. I believe a significant reason for this is that North American boats tend to carry (or generally tow) larger dinghies and outboards than the average European yacht. Beyond providing the opportunity to look cool (or perhaps some other adjective) whilst zooming through anchorages at 15 knots+ whilst standing-up, I struggle to see the reason in most cases for needing this larger dinghy and outboard.

Buy an 8-9' dinghy/rib and it will fit comfortably on the foredeck of most yachts of 30' or bigger and it's easily hoisted aboard using the spinnaker halyard. Similarly a 3-6hp outboard can be easily hauled aboard and clamped onto the pushpit rail; problem solved; you can probably buy a 9' rib cheaper than having davits made.
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Old 13-07-2015, 09:58   #21
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Re: I have had it with towing the Dingy

get an inflatable and deflate and stow it whenever you are underway. a pain but a solution.
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Old 13-07-2015, 10:10   #22
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Re: I have had it with towing the Dingy

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Originally Posted by Old Swampy View Post
IMHO lifting the dink, while better for sailing, is a step toward a less safe condition. My dinghy is towed from a a short line through a rope clutch. Open the rope clutch and drop the dinghy as soon as someone goes OB. To keep the dink from blowing away, you also need to deploy a small sea anchor previously connected to the drop line and stored in a small tube pointing aft. The drop line has a loop at the aft end to which the dinghy painter clips with a carabiner. The instruction to drop the dinghy, if I fall overboard, is the first, and most often made, request I make of my wife. The dink has a short rope ladder on one side of the outboard mounting location. The dink is a lot easier to see than a person in the water. If the person OB gets into the dink quickly, he or she might avoid serious hypothermia. Certainly his or her prospects are better.
What happens when the dinghy breaks lose? We never tow a dinghy but am aware of how many people tell of the towing eye ripping out or the line parting. Suddenly, its not so safe anymore especially as this action shall most likely occur at the worst possible times (as do most negative events). Having a quickly deployed dinghy certainly can can have significant safety benefits.
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Old 13-07-2015, 10:26   #23
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Re: I have had it with towing the Dingy

We were towing, and got tired of dealing with the the dink - constantly looking back, adjusting for wavelengths and speed, and most of all the drag. We just recently installed transom davits that solved our towing issue. Forespar has one davit set with relatively long arms, and 350 lb. load, and may work on you canoe stern. Worth a look.
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Old 13-07-2015, 10:29   #24
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Re: I have had it with towing the Dingy

Quote:
Originally Posted by PappysSailing View Post
Seems a shame to carve up a pretty boat like that w 'carp' (new word for the day) on the stern. I strap a light weight, short, but beamy kayak on the foredeck. Takes two minutes to deploy; never had a problem and they're fun to run up on the beach. Mine has a second small seat forward that my wife can use for short runs, but I can easily fit another kayak on the foredeck, upside down / side by side the first w no interference w hatch or lines. I can also tow the second behind as a barge if/when the grocery/beer order gets excessive. They also have good-sized inflatables, but I like to keep it simple. Cheers, Pappy
You know I have been seriously considering a kayak as my dink. Or at least my day to day dink.
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Old 13-07-2015, 10:32   #25
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Re: I have had it with towing the Dingy

I must say after reading the thing about the burnt sailboat, a deflatable looks less inviting. If he had not had a dink he could get in the water, he would have spent hours floating in the water. Never a good prospect.
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Old 13-07-2015, 10:35   #26
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Re: I have had it with towing the Dingy

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Originally Posted by goat View Post
Amazing how much drag those little buggers create. How 'bout something simple like this?;



Good luck,

goat
This. Yours needs to be tall. It aint brain surgery. You will love your davits compared with the other alternatives once you get all your details worked for stabilizing the dink etc. You just need to clear the rudder. Have a motor bracket also and remove the motor prior to lifting. I assume your Ingrid is a cutter not a ketch?
or... the Folboat
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Old 13-07-2015, 11:24   #27
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Re: I have had it with towing the Dingy

p.s.- Along with the kayaks, I also keep a Jim Buoy 6 man raft aboard while offshore... in case. Although I think I may need to do a little work on shark- proofing the poly netting (w thin metal rectangular bottom frame) that hangs below the doughnut hole.
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Old 13-07-2015, 11:34   #28
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Re: I have had it with towing the Dingy

Good thinking, Swampy. I tow an 8' Trinka with a cover on it. Adjust length of tow to conditions. Worked on sea going tugs and barges since mid-60's. It's not dragging something through the water if done right; it's TOW BIZ.
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Old 13-07-2015, 13:25   #29
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Re: I have had it with towing the Dingy

We have a 35' cutter with an outboard rudder and two dinks. The inflatable is typically stowed in a bag, in the stern below decks. We tow our Montgomery 6'8" hard dink unless making a crossing. It has almost no drag and tows like a dream 20 to 40 feet astern. Never had a problem doing so.

If doing a crossing we hoist the Montgomery to the fore deck and flip it. The soft dink is then brought on deck, where it is stored rolled up in its bag. It is a very small one also, West Marine 7'. On both we use a 2.5 2 stroke Merc. Stored on the stern rail and super light.

Thought about davits but they block the view and IMHO are not safe offshore.

While the Montgomery is super small it still supports two small adults, our grandson, who is 12, and our 55# Lab. We love hard dinks and seldom use the soft one.
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Old 13-07-2015, 13:52   #30
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Re: I have had it with towing the Dingy

Any comments on Porta-bote? That looks like a great answer for a stowable dink.
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