Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 19-08-2016, 22:19   #1
Registered User
 
SailingFan's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Florida
Boat: Hunter 27, 1978
Posts: 191
Hualout and maintenance on 78 Hunter 27

Ok, hauled her out, and this is what we see.



Most is the spongy growth that comes from being immersed and immobile in Florida's St John's River, in the freshwater section south of Green Cove Springs.

Note that the barnacles that were present from the ICW in Daytona are nearly entirely hidden under the layer of freshwater vegetation and the creatures in the barnacle casings are dead and gone, leaving only the shards of their houses behind.


Once the pressure washer hit the hull, the barnacles and oyster bed were the primary foulants, with minor groups of wormlike calcium deposits which I am assuming were made by a creature that lives within the tubes.

I used a flat point shovel as a hull scraper at this point, providing a nice pile of marine trash under the vessel while she was on the lift.



Most of the garbage here came from the keel!

Look at the rudder area..




Note there is not an anode on the exterior of any metal portions, and the keel became the anode (so USE ANODES PEOPLE).
__________________

__________________
SailingFan
1978 Hunter 27
Learning by the day!
SailingFan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-08-2016, 22:43   #2
Registered User
 
SailingFan's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Florida
Boat: Hunter 27, 1978
Posts: 191
Re: haulout and maintenance on 78 Hunter 27

Now we go to the keel... There is a gap at the keel-hull join, and there is also some corrosion to the keel bolts in the bilge at the forward leading positions. The encrusted rudder did not reveal this crack, but the cleaned keel... ouch. Someone has also been here before sometime since 1978...



Then we went to the rudder, and things turned for the worse.

This is the before....




And then the after...



And THAT is why you need to know your water depth and keep lines from snagging the rudder. The plane itself does not appear to have more than ablative paint wear damage, but the rudder is canted to the rear and the post is bent at the rudder/hull connection. The rudder is also apparently canted a little toward the port side as a result of this bend, but it is tight on the post, so the post must be the bent part if I read this correctly.



And then there is this... There is substantial wear; with rudder turned to 90 degrees you can easily see the damage. The top of the rudder has some wear, but the hull skeg is clearly worn away. I am hoping that the white exposed area is not the internal gelcoat layer. The hull is internally dry, no leaks, but this was concerning when I found it today. Not sure what to do about that, but I will be sealing some epoxy over it just in case.

Here is the apparent lean....



Looking at the prop shaft, it looks like it may also be bent too, I will have to check into that. Oddly, there is no corrosion on the shaft, there was only growth. I suppose the cannibalism on the keel saved it. Regardless, for the rudder, the bent post is not terribly apparent here, but...



In this pic, it seems pretty substantial. I don't know what this will do to performance, no idea whatsoever. I would love to hear from someone who has seen what this does to a sailboat underway.

Note my ubercool Trex steps. The ones that were on Bonus when acquired were made of white Starboard-like material, and they were literally crumbling and cracked, even chalky. This Trex material came from The Home Depot, and it was easy to cut and shape, is waterproof, and will never rot. It also is over 5 inches across, nice for the foot, relative to the 3 inch version that these replace. Love these steps (non-slip, too). I think it cost me something like 20 bucks for these, as a set, and I have a couple pieces left from that single 8 foot plank to add a bottom step (as the current bottom step is a little too high for a starter and I will be adding a lower one on an extension). I heard someplace in these boards that Trex is too heavy, but I have to say, this little bit did not add much at all to what was lost by removing that crappy and dangerous Starboard material (not saying it is normally dangerous, but my old steps were in my case).
__________________

__________________
SailingFan
1978 Hunter 27
Learning by the day!
SailingFan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-08-2016, 23:10   #3
Registered User
 
SailingFan's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Florida
Boat: Hunter 27, 1978
Posts: 191
Re: haulout and maintenance on 78 Hunter 27

OK, now on to the cleaned hull sections..



This is one of a few chipped gelcoat areas, I am thinking this is what is commonly referred to as "blisters", and the boat also has some cracked gelcoat here and there.



By the way, this is how I know the spongy crap comes from where the boat is currently moored... note the fender..



Another blister. This is how most of them look, not the gooey drippy sort so much, more like this blown out gelcoat layer delamination. There are tiny hairline cracks around, and I am thinking that maybe the water is intruding into these cracks and perhaps blowing the areas loose, but I really don't know enough about it to claim that for sure. Just a guess..

I am thinking that if I leave her out of the water for a day or two in the Florida heat, these will dry out. Then I think I can hit it with an epoxy based hard antifouling paint, and then perhaps an ablative on top of that.

Alternatively, since I have two gallons of hard paint and two of soft ablative, perhaps I should use the hard (what the locals in the area are using) and save the soft ablative for saltwater use at a later date. Ideas or suggestions???



This rudder is really bugging me. It almost looks like the rudder would extend below the shoal keel if the rudder were mounted as I would term "correctly", but it seems to steer her fine under the power of the outboard alone. I wonder if it can be bent back without making things even worse...

The blue material is the prior ablative coat on the hull, and it is sticking tenaciously. I am thinking that I may not have to remove all of it, because it is not coming off easily at this point (I am at the point of using sharpened scrapers and a grinder that mostly either burnishes the paint or gouges it away far too severely), and I am not looking for the perfect hull because I am not a racer. Minor imperfections in appearance under the waterline do not make me concerned, I am more interested in the other functions of the paint.

I am looking to retain waterproofing by sealing the gelcoat cracks somewhat if that would help (most of there are VERY small, but they cover a large percentage of the below-waterline hull), prevent severe fouling, make cleaning easier later on (and it was not as tough as I thought it would be to this point given the vision I had when we first hauled her up, so the prior paint served the purpose of cleaning very well, though it was far too worn away to protect from the wildlife as much anymore). Given that the majority of fouling was really the spongy stuff, I am not disappointed in the paint the PO used. He just let it get too far gone before hauling out again.

More again after I do some more work in the next day or two.
__________________
SailingFan
1978 Hunter 27
Learning by the day!
SailingFan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-09-2016, 21:39   #4
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Florida
Boat: Hunter 27
Posts: 3
Re: haulout and maintenance on 78 Hunter 27

Hi there. I have a 79 Hunter 27. We acquired it at a good deal and have been trying to restore it. We recently had the top and bottom painted along with an electrical redo. Somehow the rudder was sheared off, long story that we are not sure about. It appears that one of the past owners did cheesy repairs to the rudder and it finally gave out. After having a new rudder made and installed we find that the packing gland is leaking very bad. We also feel the fiberglass job they did is not very secure. It did not do this before and the mechanic is saying that the packing gland may be incorrect for the boat. He said that he can only use one round of packing and most use 3. I am wondering if there is any way we could get a picture of what your packing assembly for the rudder shaft looks like along with the shaft up through the top opening for the emergency tiller. Our mechanic is coming out on Wednesday to repack the gland at our expense. We have put a 3x2 pvc bushing at the top of the shaft to secure it from moving. What do you use for an emergency tiller if you have one at all? Please help.
__________________
dlsflorida is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-09-2016, 13:35   #5
Registered User

Join Date: May 2015
Location: Port Kent, NY
Boat: Ericson 28/2
Posts: 17
Re: haulout and maintenance on 78 Hunter 27

Just an opinion. Rudder will have to be replaced. You're never going to get that shaft straight again. Hoping you intend to let the bottom dry out for at least 6 months. More than likely you have water in the laminate. At 38 years of age I would think that both the rudder and hull are somewhat saturated. Hope I'm wrong.
__________________
afrakes
RebaGee
E-28/2
Afrakes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-09-2016, 13:45   #6
Registered User
 
SailingFan's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Florida
Boat: Hunter 27, 1978
Posts: 191
Re: haulout and maintenance on 78 Hunter 27

Quote:
Originally Posted by dlsflorida View Post
... we find that the packing gland is leaking very bad. We also feel the fiberglass job they did is not very secure. It did not do this before and the mechanic is saying that the packing gland may be incorrect for the boat. He said that he can only use one round of packing and most use 3. I am wondering if there is any way we could get a picture of what your packing assembly for the rudder shaft looks like along with the shaft up through the top opening for the emergency tiller. Our mechanic is coming out on Wednesday to repack the gland at our expense. We have put a 3x2 pvc bushing at the top of the shaft to secure it from moving. What do you use for an emergency tiller if you have one at all? Please help.
I sympathize with you, qualified and knowledgeable mechanics for these vessels are in amazingly short supply because they all seem to be more familiar with newer vessels despite the incredible availability of these, but perhaps it is the lack of frequency that they actually see these (as the owners tend to self-maintain them a great deal from what I am seeing in my efforts to locate information and eventually being forced to do all the work personally).

First, check your manual, you may find that this unit only takes a single or two rounds, and if I recall from my research, it is only one round, but I could be wrong. What does he mean by "most use three" though? Most what?? Most.. Yanmar units of this size, most Hunters, most boats...?? It would be wise to check that out before assuming your mechanic knows how many wraps should be used, because he is probably considering other boats, not ours.

However, there IS a size requirement of the used packing material, so he must use the correct diameter of packing cord or all the comparison of wrap numbers is moot and a seal seems far less likely. I (unfortunately) don't have a photo of mine because I am reluctant to break what is not currently broken to take the picture while standing on my head after having a kidney recently operated upon.

I apologize, but that said, my research showed that the material makes a wrap and then seals through use of tapered ends that compress against the wrap material with the adjustment nut over a compressing washer, and that nut itself is held stable by use of a jam nut to prevent wandering of the adjusting nut. Additionally, if you turn the dry shaft without it being immersed in water very much, it WILL damage the packing and you will get increasingly severe leaks the more you do that (so don't do that ). Of note is that improper packing material size makes the wraps impossible to seat correctly, and the material JUST fits when properly installed. An easy fit probably translates into leaks. By the way, had someone messed with this assembly immediately prior to the leaks? If so, what did they do? Repack it? If so, there is your answer.

I have no plans to remove my packing for replacement at the moment, or I would be happy to make pics for you while someone else did this work. I just physically cannot do it at this time, though. I have not done it before with this vessel, so cannot promise you what you would encounter (especially if someone has been there before) if you were to tear into that. Still, from my research, these boats were designed to be serviceable by the operator without a great deal of tech knowledge, and from my experience with working on the engine of this one, that has proven to be the case to date. It simply cannot be that difficult to do if you have the flexibility to get into that engine compartment.

Now, the gland in the original vessel is SUPPOSED to leak, a drip or three per minute if I recall correctly, and this simply proves the thing is getting lubricated properly. If there is no leak, it is actually a BAD thing according to Yanmar specs. If there is a more severe leak, the adjustment nut is supposed to limit it with minor turning, and when the nut adjustment reaches spec limit, the packing is supposed to be replaced.

In other words, a leak is not automatically indicative that the packing is bad, and more often suggests a minor compression nut adjustment is on the immediate schedule. You may check into that before getting someone to come to you to fix something that may not even be operating out of standard parameters. That packing is supposed to get wet to stay cool. There are non-drip units for sale out there, if the minor drip is an annoyance, however I have heard mixed reviews on them, and am opting to stick with factory for this part for now.

My boat does not seem to have ever had a wheel steering column, and there is no emergency tiller, it is a dedicated hand-tilled vessel. The shaft from the tiller goes directly into the rudder, and there is no hole in the cockpit for a second column to have been located in the past either. The traveler location prohibits any possibility of using the back of the cockpit for sitting behind a wheel or transiting from one side to the other to tack back there. The traveler bridges just ahead of the lazarette, livewell, or whatever you want to call that box on the inside transom, at centerline on the hull, and you have to step around the traveler mount assembly to access the rear entry rail itself.

My tiller simply sits atop it's own dedicated column, and rotates above a metal bearing surface, though it does have some vertical play, perhaps a half inch if I lightly lift on it? The rudder floats exceptionally well, so it does not take much effort to lift the rudder post. I am trying to figure out how to hold it down, in fact...

I am currently considering how I can simply mount some form of collar below the skeg on the rudder shaft (or simply between it and the rudder spade itself) to stop the erosion that appears to be happening between the mating surfaces (that should not be there) and hopefully eliminate the likelihood of eventual hull penetration where the two are occasionally meeting, currently. I have yet to determine the best way to accomplish this with the rudder shaft still intact, because if I cut the shaft, I am going to rebuild the rudder! This is something I was attempting to avoid on this vessel, as this is not my eventual boat for cruising but my step-from platform to that eventual vessel, instead.

My shaft appears to be bent within the boat itself, rather than in the rudder or between the rudder and the skeg. I am going to leave it as is for now as well, concerning that bend, because I have no idea of how to safely work the metal further without damaging things worse. If I have to, I may build a new one, but that is not in the immediate plan, provided I see no further changes in relationship to how things align at this time. I am taking measurements before we refloat Equinox, just in case, and for comparison at next haulout.


Afrakes,

As far as the hull drying goes, she floats a couple inches above the lower extreme edge of the bootstrap (and has been on the hard for about two months now, after that observation was made), and has not visibly wept any water since her haul-out. I have no illusions that the hull laminate in entirety is internally "dry", as water surely has intruded into all those gelcoat cracks. However, I have already applied the first layer of epoxy-based bottom paint (and am adding two more very soon), and have also sealed the freeboard with polyurethane, so I am going to go with it as-is on that issue. I don't think it is as severe an issue as the market product sellers would have us believe.

It is a 38 yr old boat, and is not new in function, behavior, or frankly, expectation (from me anyway). It also is a stepper boat, one that I may not get my minor investment from should I move up (my eventual intention), and that is acceptable too. I have not heard of any vessel that sank (or even leaked internally) from osmotic blisters or from water intrusion through cracked gel-coat, and believe that the primary damage would be either from increased hull weight (obviously not an issue as high as she floats) or from dampness in the hull as water soaks through the glass (also not an issue from the dry interior she currently sports as well). Gelcoat is hygroscopic as well, though not as much so as raw glass resin of the era, so even sealed gelcoat is not purely dry or stable (hence the small flexing cracks and blisters). Add to this that nobody can assure that a blister repair job is going to remain intact for 38 months, let alone 38 years, and that becomes a moot point. I have the epoxy handy, but I am not going to waste it like that when I have a compressed mast step to repair still.

I am finding less and less proof that blisters and gel coat cracks really mean anything at all, and more and more that they are a cosmetic issue only, that otherwise properly created fiberglass, while hygroscopic, is only slightly so. I think the bigger issue is potential weakness areas where the glass was improperly saturated, and that the hand-laid hulls of that age are not nearly so critical as the hulls sold today because of the sheer thickness of these older hulls, for which I am grateful. If such were not the case, how would we have these tens of thousands (or more) older hulls still floating around, which we today are attempting to "repair" to make them seaworthy?

I think that this obsession over dry hull laminates and blisters or spider cracks has more to do with attractiveness for other people than the boat's owner (aka "status through cosmetic appearance") than it does to do with leaks or anything tangibly important in the utility of the vessel for cruising or island hopping. I am not going to miss a tenth of a knot of speed on a sailboat.

The rudder is probably far more of an issue, and someday, I agree that a replacement of at least the post itself is going to be necessary. It is my hope that such is not the case now, though, because the cost of outsourcing that will be higher than what I paid for the entire vessel. I have heard on these threads of a means whereby one could insert a steel rod into the hollow post, and then pour epoxy in to secure/stiffen the assembly, and that may be how I initially do it, but I am also considering using virgin stainless tube and filling it, then carving the rudder to accept it in place of the old material. That way I could retain the original shape and size of the old rudder, while making the shaft stronger. Of course, we would not want to tear the transom loose next time someone runs into a sand bar, either... That bendable tube may be a good idea? A home-made kick-up rudder may be the better solution...
__________________
SailingFan
1978 Hunter 27
Learning by the day!
SailingFan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-09-2016, 17:52   #7
Marine Service Provider
 
fstbttms's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Under a boat, in a marina, in the San Francisco Bay
Posts: 3,300
Re: haulout and maintenance on 78 Hunter 27

Quote:
Originally Posted by SailingFan View Post
Oddly, there is no corrosion on the shaft, there was only growth. I suppose the cannibalism on the keel saved it.
Why do you assume that any corrosion on the keel (not visible on any pix, IMHO) saved the running gear from corroding? Are they electrically bonded somehow?
__________________
fstbttms is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-09-2016, 18:25   #8
Senior Cruiser
 
Cheechako's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Skagit City, WA
Posts: 17,495
Re: Hualout and maintenance on 78 Hunter 27

You need to strip the boat clean, let I dry as long as possible and put epoxy on it before bottom paint.
__________________
"I spent most of my money on Booze, Broads and Boats. The rest I wasted" - Elmore Leonard











Cheechako is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-09-2016, 22:26   #9
Registered User
 
SailingFan's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Florida
Boat: Hunter 27, 1978
Posts: 191
Re: haulout and maintenance on 78 Hunter 27

Quote:
Originally Posted by fstbttms View Post
Why do you assume that any corrosion on the keel (not visible on any pix, IMHO) saved the running gear from corroding? Are they electrically bonded somehow?
I thought about this to a great length, and I can only say that it would not surprise me to learn that some element of wiring may connect to the keel via electrical conduction through the bilge wiring, because I saw some material on the keel that looked like lead was removed, and a pitted surface remained. What caused the pitting? I don't believe fish ate it (but who knows?)

When I made the post, I was thinking that perhaps water in the bilge could create an electrical bridge between the keel bolts and current leaching from old wiring, but that was a supposition, again, based on 38 year old wiring and what turned out to be Scotch-Lok connections! I am in the process of replacing all that lower wiring, and considering doing the same for that in the cabin overhead as well.

I suppose that an isolated piece of lead the size of this keel (supposedly 3200 lbs) could corrode absent internal electrical charges (or that alloys within the material could dissolve, leaving the lead part of the alloy behind where it was structurally sound enough to remain after the other elements were removed from the casting) without some other electrical connection. It seemed more likely that some other mechanism was acting on it, but I readily admit that I could be wrong on that point. Regardless, pitting is present, was filled with epoxy-based anti-fouling hard paint, and will be so until the paint wears away or until I (or someone else) remove(s) it on a future haul-out. It is staying so for now.

I also dug deeper since the date of that post, and there ARE some corrosion pits on the drive shaft. I cleaned them out, and am debating on what to fill them with currently.

As far as coating goes, the paint is already there, and will have to remain so for this trip around the sun. Maybe next time I will go farther and do more to fix things, but for now, this is better than it was, and an improvement over what would have been, considering what I have seen so far. I do understand that many will not agree with my opinion about the value of making a perfectly sealed hull laminate skin at this point, but right now, I have no operational option to do so, and even less capability now that my physical health has been so compromised. I am going to finish this thing, enjoy the heck out of it, and hopefully move on to a better situation once I get things back on the right track elsewhere in life.
__________________
SailingFan
1978 Hunter 27
Learning by the day!
SailingFan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-09-2016, 09:41   #10
Senior Cruiser
 
Cheechako's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Skagit City, WA
Posts: 17,495
Re: Hualout and maintenance on 78 Hunter 27

"I also dug deeper since the date of that post, and there ARE some corrosion pits on the drive shaft. I cleaned them out, and am debating on what to fill them with currently."


You will likely find pitting especially inside the stuffing box on that shaft. It tears up the stuffing material. The shaft would have to be replaced.
__________________
"I spent most of my money on Booze, Broads and Boats. The rest I wasted" - Elmore Leonard











Cheechako is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-09-2016, 15:15   #11
Senior Cruiser
 
Ann T. Cate's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: aboard, cruising in Australia
Boat: Sayer 46' Solent rig sloop
Posts: 7,397
Re: Hualout and maintenance on 78 Hunter 27

One of those pictures shows chopped strand roving under what you are calling a blister. It toes not look like the osmosis blisters I have seen, because they usually present as a pimple, and if you pierce it, the watery junk comes out. To me that looks like the gelcoat has de-laminated from the fiberglass.

One issue you will want to investigate further is how much salt water intrusion there has been to the iron keel. I've seen only one iron keel the owner was attempting to repair: it is a huge job, filthy, and requiring physical strength.

You'll be needing a new shaft, and you'll be needing a new rudder post and possibly rudder, as the existing one may be on the verge of parting from its tabs.

Me lad, you've got a lotta work ahead of you. Good luck with it.

Ann
__________________
Ann & Jim, U.S. s/v Insatiable II, free at last, will check in when in internet range
Ann T. Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-09-2016, 11:04   #12
Registered User
 
SailingFan's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Florida
Boat: Hunter 27, 1978
Posts: 191
Re: Hualout and maintenance on 78 Hunter 27

Thanks for the replies, everyone, by the way. I do appreciate it!

I think the gel-coat simply was cracking and the cracks were close enough (and the resin used was thinly enough applied) that the gelcoat flaked away from the glass. I have not found any "juicy" blisters, and all the crazing seems to have allowed moisture to leave the area anyway. As previously stated, once the initial lift was done, she has not bled any water or goo since. It has been hot as heck here so that may have something to do with it as well, but I don't know that for sure. Again, however, I am limited to what I can physically do and fiscally afford (which, sadly, is not much these days).

The rudder is solid on it's shaft, the shaft does not leak rust anywhere, and the rudder is not wet. It also floats exceptionally well, so I am less and less concerned about the member's integrity, though the shaft is still a concern. Still, until I can afford to replace it....

As far as the drive shaft issue, the pitting is in a few very specific locations, apparently where some form of hull paint or other contaminant was dropped onto it. There is no leaking to the hull interior from the stuffing box when the shaft is not moving, but as I have yet to pull the box I cannot say whether any corrosion exists within it.

Fortunately, for the moment, the boat is on the hard and will be moored in fresh water, but as this water does flow to the ocean and as I will be moving her about into and out of salt water while in use, it seems a good idea to take a peek should any significant leak present itself. There appears to be no widespread damage, only a couple spots where this damage has entered the stainless, restricted externally to a couple small pea-sized spots perhaps halfway down the open length of the shaft between the support and where the shaft leaves the hull itself. For what it may or may not be worth, there appears to be no restriction in the rotation of the shaft when turned by hand, no grabbing, nor any restriction that slows the rotation when the shaft is turned in neutral by hand. It just rotates evenly slower until it stops. It is pretty well balanced, in fact, a pleasant surprise.

That said, I am considering whether it may be possible to use some form of material to bond the corroded areas so that they no longer are exposed to the elements, perhaps clean them out with a Dremel tool and diamond bit as a dentist would use for creating a tooth filling, then fill them with epoxy or perhaps marine JB Weld, smooth the repaired areas, and move forward. The worst case for the exposed areas would be that the filler may not hold, best case is that the filler will hold.

As I am not one to use the engine all that much anyway (and I have the 8 HP outboard sailboat kicker too, for the times I am on flatter waters, which at the moment is all the time - it brought us from Daytona to Jacksonville then up the St John's to Palatka without a hiccup, and with pretty reasonable fuel use I may add). I guess I am saying that if worst came to worst, I could remove the shaft entirely and seal the shaft hole, while using the outboard! It is nice to have options, even if the purists among us (myself included) do not favor them. I would rather have the inboard for the reason of rough weather and prop location issues, though, if it can be achieved. The kicker is really for smooth water only and would be less than useful in rough waters due to propeller location.

As far as the keel goes, mine is not iron, it is lead. There is no rust whatsoever on the keel, it is soft enough to dent with mechanical impacts, and thuds (does not ring). Additionally, it gets a shiny spot when hit with a grinder that does not spark (and gouges like lead does, rather than offering a smooth ground surface like iron would). It is lead. The builder specs called for lead as well, and I have no reason to suspect that this is not the original keel.
__________________
SailingFan
1978 Hunter 27
Learning by the day!
SailingFan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-09-2016, 11:52   #13
Registered User
 
Sun and Moon's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Colorado
Boat: Bristol 29
Posts: 269
Re: Hualout and maintenance on 78 Hunter 27

How long was the boat sitting to acquire that layer of growth?
__________________
Sun and Moon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-09-2016, 12:13   #14
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: East of the river CT
Boat: Oday Mariner 19 , Four Winns Marquis 16 OB, Kingfisher III
Posts: 238
Send a message via Skype™ to Colin A
Re: Hualout and maintenance on 78 Hunter 27

Not sure about your area. But I would suggest pulling the rudder and prop shaft and bringing them to a marine machine shop to have a look. They will be the best to advise on repairs. Most don't do rudders but I know a of a few that do and were fairly reasonable to do rudder shaft repairs if you were willing to do the glass repairs (I.E. cut away the glass to access the bent section and repair afterwards) . Given the damage I would really want to pull the rudder and inspect the bearing areas.
__________________
mysite: Colinism.com
Work for
Bass Products
Colin A is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-09-2016, 18:14   #15
Registered User
 
SailingFan's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Florida
Boat: Hunter 27, 1978
Posts: 191
Re: Hualout and maintenance on 78 Hunter 27

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun and Moon View Post
How long was the boat sitting to acquire that layer of growth?
I am unsure of some of it. The shell growth was there in Daytona when I picked her up in about March, and the PO told me that he had not hauled her since he bought her last August, but the clean water made it easy to see some of the grass growth (though I did not dive to see fully what was under there, a mistake on my part as the bent rudder would then have been obvious).

The sponge growth and other top slime above the barnacles came from fresh water in the St. John's River once I moored her in Palatka, a week or so later, until August. Therefore, I have to say it was at least a year in combination for both, with most of the thickness of the layer coming from the freshwater mooring without any movement from April this year until August of this year. The barnacles were all minus any fleshy internals, so I guess they died in the freshwater and were eaten by minnows or something, or abandoned ship when the salt receded en-route to the freshwater part of the river.

Total thickness at time of haulout was between 1 and three inches, depending on where you looked and what you were looking at (ie. was it sponge on top of a barnacle, or just sponge on shell-free hull areas?). I do know she was hauled at some point early last year, as there were not so many shells as there were sponges of the freshwater variety, and she had a fairly dense layer of bottom paint on board in the sponge-only areas. The shells seemed to have only attached where there was no bottom paint, or very thin amounts. Some of the barnacles were colonies of perhaps 8 to 10 creatures aside one another, the rest were singles, and very small relative to the longer large colonies. The sponge was an even 1 inch per unit, with some stacking here and there on barnacles.
__________________

__________________
SailingFan
1978 Hunter 27
Learning by the day!
SailingFan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
hunter, maintenance

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
My 'Maintenance-Free' Facnor Headsail Furling Unit Needs Maintenance Hugh Walker Deck hardware: Rigging, Sails & Hoisting 22 05-10-2016 20:47
Hatch for Hunter 1988 Hunter 45 Legend paccrest Monohull Sailboats 3 10-04-2014 12:02
What are you thoughts on a Hunter 42 passage vs. a Hunter 50 chucklet321 Monohull Sailboats 12 11-10-2012 07:22
Comments on Hunter 42 passage, Hunter 45, hunter 45 cc, hunter 49 and 50 chucklet321 Monohull Sailboats 3 07-10-2012 14:19


Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:48.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.