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Old 05-12-2015, 11:36   #46
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Re: How to - Making a cockpit dining table

Enough Delancey !
The hole that you're digging for yourself has reached heroic proportions.
An amateur who produced something that he is proud of (and justifiably so)
wants to share his achievement with people who can only dream of having the patience and talent to produce such a thing.I,personally would want to bathe in the praise heaped upon myself for such an achievement.
The man is not building a boat,it's something to admire and put a beer on.
You are,officially, a grumpy old man,
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Old 05-12-2015, 12:09   #47
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Re: How to - Making a cockpit dining table

I excused myself from the thread but people keep addressing me. As long as they do I will respond. That's my prerogative.

Maybe you don't want to learn anything. Maybe you've "left the room". Fine by me. I certainly wouldn't presume to speak for others the way you do, but that's your prerogative.

Anyone interested in learning the specifics of the alternatives I have suggested. Ask away. I will be happy to share what I know.
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Old 05-12-2015, 13:30   #48
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Re: How to - Making a cockpit dining table

Gorgeous! I've done plenty of marquetry in the past and I know how difficult work of that standard is. Well done.
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Old 16-01-2016, 12:21   #49
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Re: How to - Making a cockpit dining table

Your table is absolutely gorgeous!!! And as a woodworker and boat carpenter for the past 40 years I can assure you that using red oak has absolutely no bearing on the quality of your work. The poster that suggests it does obviously can't tell the difference between a hull strake on a wooden boat and a dinette table on the interior of a fiberglass catamaran. Unless your boat sinks your table needn't be any more rot resistant than my dining room table at home. Great work!
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Old 16-01-2016, 16:51   #50
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Re: How to - Making a cockpit dining table

Ha! You guys are funny. I NEVER EVER said the OP's table was ugly. I said RED OAK was a crap wood species that didn't belong on a boat.

I showed you a video of a salty shipwright to explain the difference to you and I challenged you guys to show me an example of the use of RED OAK by a reputable boatbuilder anywhere to prove me wrong and you couldn't.

You can make comments about me getting raped by a piece of a RED OAK when I was a child if you think that is appropriate (way to keep it classy OP!!!) or tell me I don't know the difference between hull planking and a cockpit table (40 years experience, huh?) all you want.

None of that will change the fact that WHITE OAK is more expensive than RED OAK because it is decidedly superior wood species and it won't change the fact that CUTTING CORNERS by skimping on materials is a decision that cannot be undone.

Some people might not value their labor very much and will prefer to save a couple bucks by buying inferior quality materials rather than getting the good stuff. Not my choice but to each his own.

From the Wood Database-

Red Oak Rot Resistance - Rated as non-durable to PERISHABLE, with poor insect resistance. Stains when in contact with water (particularly along the*porous growth ring areas). Red Oaks do not have the level of decay and rot resistance that White Oaks possess. -THIS MEANS CHEAP CRAP SUITABLE FOR ONLY DUNNAGE!!!

Red Oak | The Wood Database - Lumber Identification (Hardwoods)

White Oak Rot Resistance - Rated as very durable; frequently used in boatbuilding and tight cooperage applications. - THIS MEANS EXPENSIVE GOOD STUFF YOU PAY EXTRA FOR WHEN YOU CARE ABOUT PRODUCING QUALITY PRODUCT!!!

White Oak | The Wood Database - Lumber Identification (Hardwoods)
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Old 16-01-2016, 18:42   #51
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Re: How to - Making a cockpit dining table

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Originally Posted by longboatman View Post
Your table is absolutely gorgeous!!! And as a woodworker and boat carpenter for the past 40 years I can assure you that using red oak has absolutely no bearing on the quality of your work. The poster that suggests it does obviously can't tell the difference between a hull strake on a wooden boat and a dinette table on the interior of a fiberglass catamaran. Unless your boat sinks your table needn't be any more rot resistant than my dining room table at home. Great work!
As an exterior woodworker, I absolutely agree.

The video posted of Red vs White Oak is an end grain demo, the OP only has minimal amounts of that.

With the limited clamps you had, epoxy wasn't a bad choice. Traditional wood glue won't span voids. But I do agree that where you can get a tight joint, wood glue is better.

Trees get water from the ground and soak it up through their veins. Some trees have bigger veins than others. Plantation, (farmed) pine or spruce have HUGE veins - that how they grow so fast and deteriorate so quickly. A South American wood like Ipe has squirly sinewy tiny veins and is pretty much rot resistant. End grain is the enemy in all cases

Enjoy your table!!! Just keep an eye on the but joints, that's where rot will start if it ever does.
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Old 16-01-2016, 19:03   #52
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Re: How to - Making a cockpit dining table

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Well CF, nothing but fickle. If the OP was asking if a Hunter would be a suitable blue water cruiser for a Cape Horn passage you would flay him alive and yet here you are falling over yourselves to demonstrate your ignorance and lack of appreciation for proper boatbuilding standards and practices.

I try and share a little of my professional expertise and it's like offering pearls before swine. Since I am apparently not salt encrusted enough maybe you will listen to this guy. He looks pretty salty.




You enjoy red oak all you want. It won't make it any more suited for use on a boat. Meanwhile the trained and educated eye will recognize it for what it is and consider the work that uses it to be the effort of an amateur. I defy any to show me a professionally built boat by any reputable builder made from red oak. Do so and I will eat my words.

PS Walnut = excellent rot resistance, great for boats and gunstocks. Birch= zero rot resistance, get it wet and watch it turn to mush.


He pulls Red Oak out of boat in the next video.
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Old 16-01-2016, 20:07   #53
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Re: How to - Making a cockpit dining table

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Originally Posted by Delancey View Post
Ha! You guys are funny. I NEVER EVER said the OP's table was ugly. I said RED OAK was a crap wood species that didn't belong on a boat.

I showed you a video of a salty shipwright to explain the difference to you and I challenged you guys to show me an example of the use of RED OAK by a reputable boatbuilder anywhere to prove me wrong and you couldn't.

You can make comments about me getting raped by a piece of a RED OAK when I was a child if you think that is appropriate (way to keep it classy OP!!!) or tell me I don't know the difference between hull planking and a cockpit table (40 years experience, huh?) all you want.

None of that will change the fact that WHITE OAK is more expensive than RED OAK because it is decidedly superior wood species and it won't change the fact that CUTTING CORNERS by skimping on materials is a decision that cannot be undone.

Some people might not value their labor very much and will prefer to save a couple bucks by buying inferior quality materials rather than getting the good stuff. Not my choice but to each his own.

From the Wood Database-

Red Oak Rot Resistance - Rated as non-durable to PERISHABLE, with poor insect resistance. Stains when in contact with water (particularly along the*porous growth ring areas). Red Oaks do not have the level of decay and rot resistance that White Oaks possess. -THIS MEANS CHEAP CRAP SUITABLE FOR ONLY DUNNAGE!!!

Red Oak | The Wood Database - Lumber Identification (Hardwoods)

White Oak Rot Resistance - Rated as very durable; frequently used in boatbuilding and tight cooperage applications. - THIS MEANS EXPENSIVE GOOD STUFF YOU PAY EXTRA FOR WHEN YOU CARE ABOUT PRODUCING QUALITY PRODUCT!!!

White Oak | The Wood Database - Lumber Identification (Hardwoods)
I have had a prized cockpit table that is primarily made from red oak for the past 30 years. I have had it on three different boats and not included it with the sale. Each time the new owners have begged me to include it. It is still in excellent condition with very little maintenance. BTW, it's not nearly has nice as the one that the OP built.

Not being a wood snob, I have never been worried about what wood it is made from, only that it is beautiful and the hundreds of compliments I have received over the years agree as well.
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Old 16-01-2016, 22:15   #54
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Re: How to - Making a cockpit dining table

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He pulls Red Oak out of boat in the next video.
My point exactly!

Salty shipwright pulls a rotten Red Oak butt block out of a work boat that needs replanking, points out that instead of being quarter sawn the rotten butt block is plain sawn and has checked, and then he complains that they didn't do a very good job when the boat was built originally. Hardly an endorsement for the builder.

Thanks for sharing, was cool to see him cut that scarf wth a chain saw.
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Old 16-01-2016, 22:33   #55
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Re: How to - Making a cockpit dining table

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I have had a prized cockpit table that is primarily made from red oak for the past 30 years. I have had it on three different boats and not included it with the sale. Each time the new owners have begged me to include it. It is still in excellent condition with very little maintenance. BTW, it's not nearly has nice as the one that the OP built.

Not being a wood snob, I have never been worried about what wood it is made from, only that it is beautiful and the hundreds of compliments I have received over the years agree as well.
Do you routinely cut corners on the rest of your boat projects as well? Or was there something special about the table that made you not think it was worth buying quality materials for?

To be a prized table that has recieved hundreds of compliments it must really be something special. Do share some photos!
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Old 16-01-2016, 22:43   #56
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Re: How to - Making a cockpit dining table

Mikado didn't say he built his table.

He did say it was still in excellent condition afte 30 years though.
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Old 16-01-2016, 22:50   #57
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Re: How to - Making a cockpit dining table

Okay, big mouth. You have made your point and can move along. You are being the annoying guy that won't go away.

OP, nice job on the table. Thanks for posting.
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Old 16-01-2016, 23:01   #58
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Re: How to - Making a cockpit dining table

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Okay, big mouth. You have made your point and can move along. You are being the annoying guy that won't go away.

OP, nice job on the table. Thanks for posting.
I excused myself from the thread a long time ago but as long as people address me I will respond. That's my prerogative.

Hiding behind a sock puppet and calling people names is your prerogative, Mr Two Posts. You've done that. Now you can move along.
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Old 17-01-2016, 02:51   #59
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Re: How to - Making a cockpit dining table

Dear all
I must Admit that Delancey looked a bit Vocal, .. but... hold on!

Do we know what we are speaking about!? Knowing WOOD, knowing intimately several tens of essences, cuts, provenances,... is a lifetime exercise, a never-ending experience.

On the one side I fully respect the making shown here....no layman could do it, and it looks great... on the other side, it looks like he put little concern on the material itself... that is Delancey's point, and I can't but agree.

Just think that there are some a ten of different Mahoganys, from 3 continents.., and you get the picture.

I am currently busy at making three new tables on my boat, indoor, outdoor, and a stool-pedestsl in the sofa area. They are a business card, in showing your boat. An item much disregarded... so far my splendid boat was sold with played mahogany-like Okoume' on top of marine plywood, I mean a semi-industrial produce.

We are currently working on secular olive-tree planks (2-300yo) and its roots ("radica").

I find it a privilege to share the making with old craftsmen who make it more of an hobby than a work.

A tribute to their knowledge, the Nature, my passions for details, and to the boat indeed.

Please you all, read DATA WOOD on the web, first.... :-)
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Old 17-01-2016, 07:25   #60
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Re: How to - Making a cockpit dining table

White oak is infinitely more rot resistant than red and nowhere on this thread has anyone suggested otherwise! However, there has been very little cabinetry (in homes or on yachts) built with white oak for the simple reason that it is boring to look at. Red oak is no more of a "crap" wood than white oak and is generally comparable in price, depending on supply and demand, where you're located, time of year, availability of saw logs, etc etc etc...Delancey, if you were ever mistakenly invited aboard my boat you would have been escorted off after your first stupid comment! No room for rude, obnoxious, know it all blowhards! OP, on the other hand, is welcome aboard anytime!
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