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Old 17-08-2013, 15:28   #1
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Question How is this Done?

There's a sense of artificiality when the "walls" of your home are fiberglass. It's something I'd like to cover with wood - a homely aesthetic. How does one do this exactly?

Take for example this catalina 27. The wood you see on the side is something that was added.



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Old 17-08-2013, 15:37   #2
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Re: How is this done?

The way it's done on my Nor'Sea27 is with stringers attached vertically every foot or so to the hull with epoxy and cloth. Then the wood, tongue and groove pine, is screwed to the stringers with bronze screws. The screws corrode with time though and break off pretty easily if you ever need to remove anything.
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Old 17-08-2013, 15:40   #3
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Re: How is this done?

Thanks. Is there any issues with condensation?
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Old 17-08-2013, 15:49   #4
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Re: How is this done?

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Thanks. Is there any issues with condensation?
There is also a type of non-absorbent insulating 3/8" to 1/2" sheet material between the stringers. Should keep moisture accumulation to a minimum, heat and cold out. Possibly polyurethane foam.
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Old 17-08-2013, 16:10   #5
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Re: How is this Done?

You can cut plywood verticals 2/3 through with the table saw so they bend well to the hull shape, goo the grooved side with bondo and hold in place, Then apply a few pieces of fiberglass cloth , top, bottom and middle across the ply after the bondo is set. Then screw strips to that. Today I would use one of the high stength glues in a tube in lieu of bondo. might not even glass it if the hull was good and rough. I put insulation in the gap on the one I did... 1/2" foam. Either way I think the strips will actually reduce condensation a little.
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Old 17-08-2013, 16:14   #6
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Re: How is this done?

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The way it's done on my Nor'Sea27 is with stringers attached vertically every foot or so to the hull with epoxy and cloth.
I tried doing a google search on stringers. I have a basic idea of what they are, but in this context, what do they look like? Do you make or buy them? Any links for that kinda stuff?
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Old 17-08-2013, 16:25   #7
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Re: How is this Done?

Stringers: They can be any type of cross section run logitudinal for stiffening. below are a couple of pics. Simple like the blue ones in teh one pic or complex like the other one. Stringers is a misuse of the word for vertical supports I think.

For the Vertical supports: Visualize a piece of plywood cut maybe 3" wide and the height of the hull to have the strips put onto. These are then attached at intervals to screw the strip to.... The strips are called Ceiling strips (not meant regarding the overhead "ceiling")
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Old 17-08-2013, 16:26   #8
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Re: How is this done?

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I tried doing a google search on stringers. I have a basic idea of what they are, but in this context, what do they look like? Do you make or buy them? Any links for that kinda stuff?
Because the hull is not flat some flexibility in the wood is necessary. You may want to research how to bend the stringer without breaking it. The thicker the wood, the less flexibility. Also, you want enough thickness to enable the screws to go in far enough.

3/4x3/4 seems about right. And stock found in a home supply should suffice.
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Old 17-08-2013, 16:29   #9
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Re: How is this Done?

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Stringers: They can be any type of cross section run logitudinal for stiffening.

Probably a misuse of the word for vertical supports. Visualize a piece of plywood cut maybe 3" wide and the height of the hull to have the strips put onto. These are then attached at intervals to screw the strip to....
okay. i was thinking of something slightly different. It would kinda be the same as the strips going horizontally, but these would be glued to the hull.
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Old 17-08-2013, 16:29   #10
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Re: How is this Done?

Just rip strips of whatever material you are going to to use for the stringers about 1"-2" in width. Then cut slots in the back about 1/2 the thickness of the material or so deep, so it will bend easier to the curvature of the hull. Space the slots out as needed. Closer together for more curvature, further apart for flatter sections.

If you want the best stringer for holding fasteners, take a piece of 1"-2" thick mahogany, place it against the hull on edge, scribe the curvature of the hull on to the board. Cut the board along the scribe and offset the scribe line for whatever thickness you want and cut it to that thickness. It's kind of like a sawn frame on a wooden boat. A bandsaw would be a real nice thing to have to do this though I've done it with a saber saw on 5/4 boards..
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Old 17-08-2013, 16:33   #11
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Re: How is this Done?

In construction, a stringer is a horizontal member used to connect upright members, as in the frame of a building. Usually the stringers are long, relatively thin pieces which provide support and definition to the skin of a structure.

The skin being the tongue and groove lengths of pine. You figger out a way to attach your skin in this case with horizontal 'stringers' and you get a prize!

Just install them vertically. They serve the same purpose.
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Old 17-08-2013, 16:36   #12
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Re: How is this Done?

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Just rip strips of whatever material you are going to to use for the stringers about 1"-2" in width. Then cut slots in the back about 1/2 the thickness of the material or so deep, so it will bend easier to the curvature of the hull. Space the slots out as needed. Closer together for more curvature, further apart for flatter sections.

If you want the best stringer for holding fasteners, take a piece of 1"-2" thick mahogany, place it against the hull on edge, scribe the curvature of the hull on to the board. Cut the board along the scribe and offset the scribe line for whatever thickness you want and cut it to that thickness. It's kind of like a sawn frame on a wooden boat. A bandsaw would be a real nice thing to have to do this though I've done it with a saber saw on 5/4 boards..
I considered mentioning the slots, but deferred considering the time and effort to do it. May be necessary though. Depends upon how severe curvature of the hull is.
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Old 17-08-2013, 16:38   #13
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Re: How is this Done?

This procedure is called installing ceilings The book "This Old Boat" covers it very well with drawings and written description.

Ceiling is the horizontal wood strips on the inside of the hull and not the overhead.

Good luck.
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Old 17-08-2013, 16:44   #14
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Re: How is this done?

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Because the hull is not flat some flexibility in the wood is necessary. You may want to research how to bend the stringer without breaking it. The thicker the wood, the less flexibility. Also, you want enough thickness to enable the screws to go in far enough.

3/4x3/4 seems about right. And stock found in a home supply should suffice.
I was thinking about that. Can you explain those dimensions? 3/4" depth by 3/4" wide?
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Old 17-08-2013, 16:47   #15
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Re: How is this Done?

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This procedure is called installing ceilings The book "This Old Boat" covers it very well with drawings and written description.

Ceiling is the horizontal wood strips on the inside of the hull and not the overhead.

Good luck.
As in the picture originally posted in this thread, my boat has the tongue and groove pine on the sides of the hull AND overhead. I've never removed anything on the overhead, but I'll bet the installation procedure is the same. No?

Talk about splitting hairs!
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