Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 15-04-2008, 19:28   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: New Orleans
Boat: Nomoboat -- yay Gustav ;)
Posts: 248
Send a message via AIM to drew.ward
How does this plan sound?

Hi all,

I've just purchased a project ferro-cement ketch. It has a strong hull, good engine (that just needs an overhaul), and good rigging and sails.

It definitely is going to need some work -- initially several months worth just to get it sailing again, and over the next year or two quite a bit more to make her a liveaboard.

So here's my plan, tell me if this sounds logical or not:

1. Clean-up -- the boat sat for quite a while and was in fact a Katrina salvage, but it didn't sink and what little water got inside dried out quickly. But, it was some guys project for many years, and as such is filled with crap. So first step is to get rid of the junk, strip out some of the stuff I just don't need, and get it down to simple mechanicals and such on the inside and a clean deck on top.

2. Engine and drive -- it has a Chrysler-nissan 4cyl marine diesel. The guy I bought it from motored it from Gulfport, MS to New Orleans with no probs, but has let it sit for the past several months. I just want to give it an overall tune up/overhaul, and replace any hoses that sort of thing.

3. Rigging -- the masts and rigging where removed after the storm. They are in great shape and most of the rigging is also fine. Some of the lines look a little rough, but usable. Eventually I'll have it re-rigged to be sure, but first step will be paying the 3 hours labor to get everythign off the deck and back in place.

4. Make cement repairs and lay a new deck.

5. Repair / replace remaining deck hardware and get the boat in sailing condition.

Now, the interior of the boat is a mess. It's not in bad shape, it's just an absolute crap layout and I have no idea what the builder was thinking, although my theory is that he eventually just ran out of time and money and got stupid or desperate to be on the water.

The wood on the topside is also eaten up termites, rot, you name it. It's usable with some minor patches, but not worth restoring as-is. The center cockpit is also in a weird layout and possibly a bit too far forward.

So I am planning on sailing the boat locally for a year or so while I save up for the various mechanicals and electronics I'll need. At the same time I want to build the new interior and topside in a workshop and then once it's finished install it onto the boat.

So basically, have everything ready to go so that I could:

Rip off the top
Rip out the interior
Rip out existing mechanicals
Install new mechanicals, plumbing, wirings
Install new interior
Install new top

The idea would be to limit the changeover time by having everything done in advance and to thus not have to work so much below deck.


OK, I know that's a super long post, but how does this sound?
__________________

__________________
drew.ward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-04-2008, 19:40   #2
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Tasmania
Boat: VandeStadt IOR 40' - Insatiable
Posts: 2,317
Images: 91
It sounds like you are in for an "interesting" couple of years. Gope that there is plenty of money in the kitty. Good luck with it. Post a few pictures if you have the time.
__________________

__________________
Weyalan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-04-2008, 19:57   #3
MV
Registered User
 
MV's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: San Diego
Boat: Willard 8 Ton World Cruiser
Posts: 461
Images: 24
Send a message via Yahoo to MV
I` I agree, you have several hard years ahead. That being said, I can offer a practial tip of use: Either plan on removing all the interior wood, or tenting the boat to get rid of the termites. They are there -- as are their eggs. I too would love to see pictures as your project progresses.

Michael
__________________
MV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-04-2008, 20:02   #4
Registered User
 
jrd22's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: San Juan Islands, WA
Boat: 1988 Brewer Three Seas 40' Pilothouse
Posts: 251
I was going to just move on after reading your post, but felt a morale obligation to give you my opinion. I suggest that you need to work this plan backwards; figure out how many thousands of hours you will have into it, and the tens of thousands of dollars, and determine if what you will end up with will be worth it financially, and more importantly, will it be the boat you really want. I don't want to dampen your enthusiasm, but you are talking about an absolutely huge, expensive project. You are going to find lot's of stuff that needs repair or replacement that you haven't even dreamt of. I've done a couple of "restorations" so I know what I am talking about. Think long and hard, and most importantly realistically, before getting into a previous investment trap.

Good luck, John
__________________
John Davidson
S/V Laurie Anne
1988 40' Brewer Pilothouse
jrd22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-04-2008, 20:31   #5
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: New Orleans
Boat: Nomoboat -- yay Gustav ;)
Posts: 248
Send a message via AIM to drew.ward
Thanks guys, I'll post some pics soon.

Also, I know it's a longterm large project. But I'm not really looking at it as a restoration as there just isn't that much worth restoring.

There are a couple of things going for me (at least as I see it):

1. I only paid 4k for the boat.

2. The bones are there and near functional (hull, deck, rigging, engine).

3. I have access to the tools and workshop space and my brother's a finish carpenter. So doing the wood work should be a bit easier.

4. I'm not really trying to create the dream boat, mainly I'm just wanting a nice simple to use, cheap to operate boat that I can enjoy with friends.

So I'm sure it's going to be more expensive than I hope, take longer than I think, and will have some interesting probs along the way. But hopefully it won't be too bad.

Oh yeah, and I'm not looking at this as an investment.
__________________
drew.ward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-04-2008, 21:29   #6
Moderator
 
Boracay's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Pelican Bay, Great Sandy National Park
Boat: Steel Roberts Offshore 44
Posts: 5,175
Images: 18
Mast up?

If you can avoid raising the mast at this stage this may be worth considering.

There are many parts on the mast that are done easiest when it is horizontal. VHF, nav. lights, lazy jacks, spreader lights come to mind.

Unless you want to start on the mast first....

My order was
1) sole (the PO manged with a few sheets of ply)
2) toilet
3) work bench
4) quarter berths (mainly as storage)
5) nav. lights and bilge pump
5) engine (nice to be able to go somewhere)
6) dinette (to have lunch)
7) Anchor windlass (so I can anchor when I get there)
8) Sliding main hatch


I am currently working on the forward cabin when it rains and the dodger/davits when it does not.

The problems with working on a boat in the water is that making everything seaworthy is always the priority task, and the temptation is to do a quick job so one can go sailing(don't give in to temptation).
__________________
Rust never sleeps
Boracay Blog.
Boracay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-04-2008, 21:57   #7
Senior Cruiser
 
44'cruisingcat's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,453
Images: 69
It's much easier (and less tempting) if the boat is on land. Access, power, using levels, - it's all easier if you can do it ashore. IMHO the difficulty of a job increases exponentially once the boat is afloat.
__________________
44'cruisingcat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-04-2008, 23:17   #8
Registered User
 
soy_el_viento's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 15
Yikes!

Well man... I gotta say I wish you the best. It seems you know a bit about what you are getting yourself into. My plan is to find a boat with good bones that I can put some work into... partly because I cannot afford a newer boat, but also just for the experience of knowing a) what is in my boat, and b) knowing how to make repairs because I would be more familiar. Those are things you can't really calculate in dollars and cents, so you will have that when you are ready to set sail (more so than many out there who simply write a check and go out and buy a novelty skipper cap ) That said, I think your plan sounds... ambitious. You were planning to actually get out and sail at some point...? Not to be discouraging, I just have done several house remodels and they have a way of snow-balling... a boat would be that tenfold. I guess if you have a lot of friends and relatives who are interested and owe you a lot of favors, this project may be the one to call in the troops on. At any rate... please keep posting about your progress. I am really interested to see how it's going and will cheer you on as best as I can.

Cheers,

don
__________________
soy_el_viento is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-04-2008, 23:48   #9
Senior Cruiser
 
Alan Wheeler's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Marlborough Sounds. New Zealand
Boat: Hartley Tahitian 45ft. Leisure Lady
Posts: 8,038
Images: 102
Quote:
1. Clean-up
Absolutely! A good clean can reveal lots. Lets hope those lots are positives.
Quote:
2. Engine and drive
Still sounding good. You probably won't be able to "tune up". But filters and oil and hoses checked and so on. Yep, your onto it.
Quote:
3. Rigging
I would use new wire. Especially if it looks a little suspect. You may as well do the wire as you install the rig.
Quote:
4. Make cement repairs and lay a new deck.
Lay as in timber?? Or was this the cement issue you had in a post earlier. I haven't caught up to that one yet, so you may have already sorted it. But yep so far it all sounds like you have it on track and in hand.
Quote:
5. Repair / replace remaining deck hardware and get the boat in sailing condition.
Be prepared for the expense. That is the part that hit us the most. Fittings add up. You don't think you need much, but simple little things right down to screws and bolts etc just add up. It is easy to blow a budget on that stuff.
I also suggest you check systems like stearing etc and ensure it is all honky dory.
It is a big project. No smaller than building from scratch. It is important to plan everything out well. The space is small, so keeping it clean is essential as you build.
Oh and you have to post photo's. It is a simple regulation we enforce here, of anyone who is in a build project :-)
__________________
Wheels

For God so loved the world..........He didn't send a committee.
Alan Wheeler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2008, 00:32   #10
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Prince Rupert
Boat: samson c-mist 32
Posts: 98
Images: 5
Nice to know I'm not the only one crazy enough to take on these kinds of projects. My first was a 24' fiberglass over plywood sloop. Currently I am into a 32' ferro that was 70' down for 2 weeks! That was 6 years ago! Phase one took 4 months of 12-14 hour days, which got me back in the water sailing and livable. Phase 2 is underway now and includes new power, refurbished house and cockpit, epoxy and new paint system from the keel up. I'm sure I would never do a project like this again. Can't say I would recommend it, but I will essentialy have a new boat when done and know every system intimately. The biggest negative I find is the hours and hours and hours of time doing mostly unpleasant work. Oh and the $, lucky I had a spare house to mortgage. I know it will be worth it in the end though, at least thats what I keep telling myself. Cheers Best of luck with your project!
__________________
emeraldsea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2008, 00:47   #11
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Hobart Australia
Boat: Hartley RORC 32
Posts: 119
Hey emerald, what sort of ferro do you have, mine is a hartley
and your story sounds so much like mine - although mine was only sitting in a yard and never finished
My work is easier, out of all the boats I have refitted - mostly timber
to have the inside cleared to start was great, afterall this work is still required either way
I have a very detailed list of what is needed to get it on the water, and the mast and rigging is one of the last
a motor will do for a while
I have to buy some winches first, although may step the mast as it only needs new rigging, and I can fit everything to it first

On that thought, what is everyones feeling on what should be fitted to the mast head, and what should be fitted to an arch. Ie radios, other aerials, wind generator and other wind equipment etc.

cheers all
we all have similar death wishes on water, isnt it fun
I get a kick out of finishing part of it

hooked
__________________
hooked on water is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2008, 05:37   #12
Armchair Bucketeer
 
David_Old_Jersey's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 10,013
Images: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by drew.ward View Post
Thanks guys, I'll post some pics soon.
Cool

A 58 Foot doer upper?.......well outside my experiance / imagination.....but I hope things go well and more than interested in hearing how things develop.
David_Old_Jersey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2008, 10:24   #13
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Prince Rupert
Boat: samson c-mist 32
Posts: 98
Images: 5
Cheers Hooked on Water, My'n is a samson C-mist. THe hull was done right and is very fair. Much of the work is in the wooden house & cockpit. If time & money permitted I would replace both with light wieght, low maintinence Aluminum, which may be phase 5....??
On a 32' I can see an end, although sometimes distant. I would definately not attempt a 58' on my own.

I look forward to seeing progress pics from others.
I will post my pics on my thread "emeraldsea refit"
__________________
emeraldsea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2008, 10:29   #14
Eternal Member
 
imagine2frolic's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Las Brisas Panama AGAIN!
Boat: Simpson, Catamaran, 46ft. IMAGINE
Posts: 4,508
Images: 123
They say that idle hands are the Devil's workshop. Looks like you won't be hanging out with him/her?
__________________
imagine2frolic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2008, 19:26   #15
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Hobart Australia
Boat: Hartley RORC 32
Posts: 119
Dear Emerald

I had not seen it was a 58 till it was said just here
I would not attempt that either until retired, too much work
a 32 is enough
although I nearly took on a 53 a few years ago, ferro
glad i didnt just too much work
good luck
I am doing ply cockpit to match the cabin, but alot work to ensure water is kept out
to keep it good
good luck
cheers
hooked
__________________

__________________
hooked on water is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Greetings from Puget Sound Jesse Holden Meets & Greets 10 11-04-2007 21:34
What did you take / plan for and didn't need to? David_Old_Jersey Liveaboard's Forum 15 24-12-2006 06:09
What did you take / plan for and didn't need to? David_Old_Jersey Liveaboard's Forum 0 20-12-2006 15:12
Pamlico Sound rleslie Navigation 2 29-06-2005 01:59
My plan irwinsailor Boat Ownership & Making a Living 9 23-06-2003 14:07



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:59.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.