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Old 17-09-2015, 11:21   #1
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High and Dry

In the continuing search for economy and self-reliance, and for cheaper ways to get at the underwater parts of my boat, I finally screwed up my courage yesterday and Ė dried out my boat against a wall.
Itís not something often done with boats this size, to say the least. They were amazed at the Royal Air Force Yacht Club, who leant me their wall. Theretofore the largest boat which had used the wall was a 45 footer. But it seemed to be suitable according to depth, width, and so forth, so Ė on I decided to go for it.
The bottom of the drying wall dries 2 meters above chart datum, so that means I need at least 4.3 meters rise of tide without margin for error. The prognosis for yesterday was 4.4 meters. So it was cutting it pretty close, and possible only at the very top of the tide, and getting stuck half way would have been a disaster.
In the event, I got the boat in all right, although I had to perform a davitectomy on the spot under time pressure.
I rousted practically all of the long ropes on board out of the lazarette, and tied off in 12 different ways Ė towards the wall to keep the boat from tipping over sideways, and towards the stern to keep the boat from tipping over forward (God forbid). After the keel touched down, I hauled the boat towards the quay to give a slight lean towards the wall.
As the water went down, the boat settled forward alarmingly. Finally stopping at 3.8 degrees. It was pouring rain and so water pooled in my cockpit (the drains are aft). But she seemed perfectly stable.
When the water had receded completely, I took the RAF pressure washer and did the bottom. Changed my anodes. Found out to my disappointment that my prop bearings are shot. Also discovered that if you use the pressure washer from too close, it will take all your antifoul right off Ė duh
Then went to have a drink in the lovely bar of the RAF Yacht Club Ė double G&T for 3.50 and a friendly welcome.
When the water came back up, I took all the lines off, and just at the top of the tide, I nosed back out and headed back to my mooring, arriving about 02:30. The RAF guys invited me to stay until the next tide the next day, but I didnít want to go through the drying out and refloating cycle all over again, especially not while sleeping. Although the boat seemed rock stable, it made me nervous.

Was it worth it? Well, I saved over $300 on a liftout, and I think itís easier on the boat then being craned around. On the other hand, it was a whole day of really hard labor. All those ropes are heavy, and seem to weigh twice as much when sopping wet under the driving rain.
Also, the bow of my boat hangs far beyond the sill and canít be reached, so I couldnít scrub that part (Iíll bring a dinghy the next time).

But I guess the best part is that it is a traditional, natural way to get at the bottom of your boat. Seamanship and your own honest labor instead of a crane and gang of hired workers. It was somehow satisfying.


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Old 17-09-2015, 11:35   #2
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Re: High and Dry

You have bigger "stuff" then me. Don't think I'd have the courage to try it
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Old 17-09-2015, 11:35   #3
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Re: High and Dry

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dockhead View Post
In the continuing search for economy and self-reliance, and for cheaper ways to get at the underwater parts of my boat, I finally screwed up my courage yesterday and Ė dried out my boat against a wall.
Itís not something often done with boats this size, to say the least. They were amazed at the Royal Air Force Yacht Club, who leant me their wall. Theretofore the largest boat which had used the wall was a 45 footer. But it seemed to be suitable according to depth, width, and so forth, so Ė on I decided to go for it.
The bottom of the drying wall dries 2 meters above chart datum, so that means I need at least 4.3 meters rise of tide without margin for error. The prognosis for yesterday was 4.4 meters. So it was cutting it pretty close, and possible only at the very top of the tide, and getting stuck half way would have been a disaster.
In the event, I got the boat in all right, although I had to perform a davitectomy on the spot under time pressure.
I rousted practically all of the long ropes on board out of the lazarette, and tied off in 12 different ways Ė towards the wall to keep the boat from tipping over sideways, and towards the stern to keep the boat from tipping over forward (God forbid). After the keel touched down, I hauled the boat towards the quay to give a slight lean towards the wall.
As the water went down, the boat settled forward alarmingly. Finally stopping at 3.8 degrees. It was pouring rain and so water pooled in my cockpit (the drains are aft). But she seemed perfectly stable.
When the water had receded completely, I took the RAF pressure washer and did the bottom. Changed my anodes. Found out to my disappointment that my prop bearings are shot. Also discovered that if you use the pressure washer from too close, it will take all your antifoul right off Ė duh
Then went to have a drink in the lovely bar of the RAF Yacht Club Ė double G&T for 3.50 and a friendly welcome.
When the water came back up, I took all the lines off, and just at the top of the tide, I nosed back out and headed back to my mooring, arriving about 02:30. The RAF guys invited me to stay until the next tide the next day, but I didnít want to go through the drying out and refloating cycle all over again, especially not while sleeping. Although the boat seemed rock stable, it made me nervous.

Was it worth it? Well, I saved over $300 on a liftout, and I think itís easier on the boat then being craned around. On the other hand, it was a whole day of really hard labor. All those ropes are heavy, and seem to weigh twice as much when sopping wet under the driving rain.
Also, the bow of my boat hangs far beyond the sill and canít be reached, so I couldnít scrub that part (Iíll bring a dinghy the next time).

But I guess the best part is that it is a traditional, natural way to get at the bottom of your boat. Seamanship and your own honest labor instead of a crane and gang of hired workers. It was somehow satisfying.


Attachment 109223
Dockhead - good for you

No offense - but I'm happy I wasn't with you doing all this (well, maybe the G&T part would ahve been OK if they had The Botanist..........................)

Just finished installing the radar on my boat - now I have to figure out how to use it
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Old 17-09-2015, 11:37   #4
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Re: High and Dry

Here in the US you would be fined most heavily for pressure washing a bottom essentially in the water. Here you can only pressure wash where all runoff goes through an expensive filtration system; ie, in a boatyard.
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Old 17-09-2015, 11:43   #5
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Re: High and Dry

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Here in the US you would be fined most heavily for pressure washing a bottom essentially in the water. Here you can only pressure wash where all runoff goes through an expensive filtration system; ie, in a boatyard.
Indeed. We think of ourselves as the land of the free. But in the UK you can do this, and you can also discharge directly overboard.

And you're not required to register any boat under 20 meters. And you don't pay any tax at all -- zero -- other than VAT on the initial purchase.
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Old 17-09-2015, 11:55   #6
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Re: High and Dry

Dockhead, another great adventure for you. Congratulations. However, if I understand correctly you still have to do the haul out to take care of the bearings and to repainted the anti-foul paint you blew off with the pressure washer. With the labor you expended was the $300 saving worthwhile?


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Old 17-09-2015, 12:13   #7
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Re: High and Dry

Dockhead: Very cool that you gave drying out try. With your very short keel, that must have been more than a little nerve racking as the bow started to settle. Can you tell us where your fore/aft center of gravity falls with respect to the bottom of your keel?

Drying wall? We don't need no stinking drying wall!

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Old 17-09-2015, 12:20   #8
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Re: High and Dry

Why didn't you simply short haul it?
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Old 17-09-2015, 13:40   #9
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Re: High and Dry

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Here in the US you would be fined most heavily for pressure washing a bottom essentially in the water. Here you can only pressure wash where all runoff goes through an expensive filtration system; ie, in a boatyard.
Hmmmmm......show me that system in south texas All the boatyards here pressure wash next to the haul out slip.
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Old 17-09-2015, 13:48   #10
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Re: High and Dry

Panope - is that Sliver in the background?


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Old 17-09-2015, 13:58   #11
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Re: High and Dry

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Hmmmmm......show me that system in south texas All the boatyards here pressure wash next to the haul out slip.
The newer rules will apply when they pull a permit to change/enlarge their slip. Existing marinas are grandfathered in on the old rules, anything new requires big $$ filtration.
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Old 17-09-2015, 14:06   #12
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Re: High and Dry

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The newer rules will apply when they pull a permit to change/enlarge their slip. Existing marinas are grandfathered in on the old rules, anything new requires big $$ filtration.

I've got a sneaking hunch new won't happen here for quite a while then. This just isn't the same market as the Pacific Northwest or Florida.


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Old 17-09-2015, 14:20   #13
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Re: High and Dry

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Hmmmmm......show me that system in south texas All the boatyards here pressure wash next to the haul out slip.
He said in the US
Actually it is more a West Coast US restriction. East coast seems much more lax. In the Chesapeake you can see boat yards power washing into the bay in sight of commercial oyster beds.
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Old 17-09-2015, 14:25   #14
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Re: High and Dry

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Panope - is that Sliver in the background?


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Old 17-09-2015, 14:41   #15
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Re: High and Dry

Well done Dockhead.
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