Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 22-08-2005, 23:39   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 41
Hatchcovers

I have 3 hatchcovers in the cockpit that need replacing.I want to make them out of teak,what is the best approach?thanks
__________________

__________________
Dman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-08-2005, 08:00   #2
Senior Cruiser
 
Alan Wheeler's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Marlborough Sounds. New Zealand
Boat: Hartley Tahitian 45ft. Leisure Lady
Posts: 8,038
Images: 102
Buy some teak?
Woodwork skills is not something that could be described in words. First question, do you have some practicle skills?? Second question, do you have some tools? OK, now I suggest you go to a library or buy a book on woodworking. Marine woodworking wood be even better, but I don't know if anything exists that would explain details like a hatch. Maybe someone knows of something.
Or you can copy the original hatches and see how the builder made them.
Teak is expensive, so be prepared. It is selling for NZ$9500,00 per cubic metre(yrd) here in NZ at present. To reduce the amount of material, some make a thin veneer about 5-12mm 1/4-1/2" and laminate this to a substrate of something like ply.
__________________

__________________
Wheels

For God so loved the world..........He didn't send a committee.
Alan Wheeler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-08-2005, 08:07   #3
Moderator
 
Boracay's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Pelican Bay, Great Sandy National Park
Boat: Steel Roberts Offshore 44
Posts: 5,175
Images: 18
How much money do you have...

In Sydney we have a mob called Capcorns who do lovely custom teak joinery for $A90 per hour.
There is probably someone like that near you.
My understanding is that teak dulls lesser blades because of the silicon embeded in it, and it does need very sharp blades.
__________________
Boracay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-08-2005, 01:51   #4
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 41
I have 1x6 teak boards and it is going to take 3 wide to join them together to get the dimensions right.What kind of joint should I be using or what would be the best way to put them together for good strength,durability and cosmetics.
__________________
Dman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-08-2005, 04:27   #5
Kai Nui
Guest

Posts: n/a
The only way to learn wood work is to do it. You night want to rip the boards you have, as wider boards tend to cup, even teak. If you are really nervous about how to build it, get some pine, and build a pine one first. Then, when you have figured out how you want the pine hatch, and made the changes to your $10 worth of wood, you can copy it in teak, and either toss the pine one, or paint it with a good epoxy, or maybe frame it as your first success.
As for a design, find a boat with a hatch you like, and take some pictures. Draw patterns on paper, until you like the shape, and as my old shop teacher used to say, measure twice, cut once.
Now for the piece de resistance, enjoy yourself! If you do not enjoy making that first hatch from pine, take your pictures, your measurements and your teak to the local boatwright, or cabinet shop, and hand him some cash.
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 24-08-2005, 04:38   #6
Registered User
 
capt lar's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Cape Cod
Boat: currently "on the beach"
Posts: 729
Images: 12
while i think it is great that you want to work wood, you will probably end up with leaky warped hatches. alan is correct that by taking apart the old hatch, you will understand the construction, but not the reasons. any cabinet maker or boat carpenter would give you the time to explain why you need to do things a specific way. find someone to share know-how ( and probably some real cool planers, joiners and bench space ) so you learn it right the first time. if you are near boston - send me an email and we will hook you up. capt. lar
__________________
Larry

We have met the enemy and he is us. - Walt Kelly
capt lar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-08-2005, 05:17   #7
Kai Nui
Guest

Posts: n/a
The problem with asking a boat carpenter how to build something, is that you will get an answer. Of course, you wil get a different answer from the next one, and another answer from the next one and so on. There are some established books out there, that will tell you how, and why. I still say try this on your own. A hatch can be quite complicated, but the tools required are pretty basic. Joiner/planers, miter saws and all the things that make the job easier, do just that. For a one off project like this, take your time.
I do agree with taking apart the old hatch, but try building the cheap hatch first, than you have a temp hatch while you take apart the original and make changes to your final version accordingly.
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 24-08-2005, 07:21   #8
Senior Cruiser
 
Alan Wheeler's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Marlborough Sounds. New Zealand
Boat: Hartley Tahitian 45ft. Leisure Lady
Posts: 8,038
Images: 102
Just to add another couple of points. Firstly you will want to be in keeping with the rest of the boat. i.e. is it old traditional or newer design etc etc. Personally, I like to have a slight curve in the hatch so as water runs off and doesn't pool. Often teak is cut inot smaller widths and then a thin laminate is fitted between each joint. I think you US guy's use Holy. could be wrong. But anyway, it is a light colored timber. If you have 1" timber, then a Solid teak hatch will be reasonably easy to do. Just probably not possible to explain here.
__________________
Wheels

For God so loved the world..........He didn't send a committee.
Alan Wheeler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-08-2005, 23:21   #9
Registered User
 
Thermal's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Honolulu
Boat: S2 11.0C 36' Puka Wai
Posts: 157
Images: 1
You should take a look at your local community college, they often have adult ed evening "classes" in their wood shops. These are not really structured classes, but more more of a do-your-own thing where you can use their expensive machinery for an evening a week for a couple of months. Usually about $50 or so, which is pocket change when you are working with teak. I have done this a few times and found the instructors to be helpful, enthusiastic, and knowlegeable if you are not sure how to proceed.
__________________
In theory, Practice and Theory are the same. In practice, they are not.
Thermal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-08-2005, 02:56   #10
Kai Nui
Guest

Posts: n/a
Hey DMAN? You still with us? What did you decide to do?
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 25-08-2005, 13:57   #11
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 41
Well I put a tongue and grove edge on the boards and put an X bracing on the backside and put a lip around the bottom of it.I am giving it an antique look and on a 35 year old boat it probably should be.I also rounded the top as well.The next project is tackling a teak toe rail.I am a machinist by trade and have worked in metal all my life since my father owned a machineshop.I fear no metal project but am out of my element when it comes to fine joinery work,however I am not to bad when I get pointed in the right direction. A machinist works in thousands a carpenter to 32nds and a boatbuilder by eye.
__________________
Dman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-08-2005, 21:17   #12
Kai Nui
Guest

Posts: n/a
Sounds like success to me.
If you have the patience to work metal, wood should be a breeze. Good luck on the toe rail. I have worked on two vessels around that age that required I remove the toe rail. Both had laminated toe rails, and each layer had it's own hardware, so beware! Hope yours is easier.
__________________

__________________
  Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:56.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.