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Old 06-01-2014, 20:54   #181
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Re: Happiness is a Warm Spool Gun

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Originally Posted by Paul Elliott View Post
Steve, that does look nice. Please keep us updated here -- you've got a lot of interested people following your progress.

Have I mentioned that you are making me want to learn how to weld?
You Bet Paul,

I plan to keep posting to this thread until launch time in late April. I will have all the "big stuff" wrapped up and will then proclaim that the project is compete (of course the reality is that I will NEVER stop fiddling around with this boat).

I highly recommend the welding skills. It sure has opened up a lot of possibilities for me.

Steve
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Old 07-01-2014, 08:31   #182
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Re: Happiness is a Warm Spool Gun

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Port Settee.

Pic #1,2 - Cutouts along bottom of backrest allow seat storage lids to be removed without lifting backrest.


Steve
OK.... How did you get the neat cutouts in the plywood? Did you make a guide for a jigsaw or what?
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Old 07-01-2014, 09:16   #183
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Re: Happiness is a Warm Spool Gun

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OK.... How did you get the neat cutouts in the plywood? Did you make a guide for a jigsaw or what?

I do the strait portions with a worm drive skill-saw (plunge) and the curves with a jig saw. No guides, just git yer face right down in there don't mess up! A little sanding afterward and it is all good.

For the cut-outs that need a lid, I use a thin kerf skill-saw blade so the cut-out can be used as the lid without it being too small.

Steve
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Old 09-01-2014, 22:42   #184
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Re: Happiness is a Warm Spool Gun

Starboard settee.

Furnace day-tank re installed on new settee backrest shelf. Notch in backrest allows fuel quantity to be observed visually.

Steve
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Old 12-01-2014, 15:48   #185
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Re: Happiness is a Warm Spool Gun

Pic #1 - Ground out the welds and lightly sanded whole leg for uniformity.

Pic #2 - Welded plate on end with a 1 inch diameter rod.

Pic #3 - Rod fits into hole in cabin sole.

Steve
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Old 12-01-2014, 16:29   #186
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Re: Happiness is a Warm Spool Gun

Beautiful, Steve

Great way to resolve the bottom end

Classic simplicity and superb function

Clean looks and easy to clean around
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Old 12-01-2014, 18:27   #187
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Re: Happiness is a Warm Spool Gun

Thanks Andrew,

Pic #1 - The pivot pad warped during welding to pipe. Machined flat.

Pic #2 - Aluminum on aluminum provided too much friction and galling. Pad covered with Formica.

Pic #3,4 - Pivot pad shape mortised into wall. Table bolted from inside head.

Steve
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Old 17-01-2014, 21:11   #188
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Re: Happiness is a Warm Spool Gun

Starboard Galley counter top torn out. The old icebox was a stand alone unit that lived behind the companionway steps where the engine is now located.

New icebox will have a minimum of 4" of insulation. The lid will be 2" or so.

I have not decided how to create a liner for the box. I would like the surface to be impervious to moisture, smooth and no inside corners for easy cleanup. Durable enough that a dropped block of ice does not damage. I would prefer that no wood (or other material that absorbs water) be used.

Some sort of epoxy based, pre-manufactured panel would be great. Thickened epoxy coves in the corners, sand and paint.

I have never done one of these before. Any suggestions appreciated.

Steve
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Old 17-01-2014, 21:44   #189
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Re: Happiness is a Warm Spool Gun

I did one in ABS once, 2.5mm or 3mm thick IIRC, with outward folds in the end panel so the lengthways trough (which was a single folding) could run past the end panels and be butt glued

If you want to fold it yourself you have to make a strip heater by screwing strips of stainless sheetmetal to mask all but a slit of the output from a long radiant heater - but it's easier to go to a plastic fabricator. (google "line bending" and ABS)

It worked out OK and stood the test of time, but I'd be tempted to get one welded up out of high density polyethylene, maybe 5mm or even 6mm, if I did it again, especially if it was a bigger one, like yours.
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Old 17-01-2014, 21:54   #190
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Re: Happiness is a Warm Spool Gun

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I have not decided how to create a liner for the box. I would like the surface to be impervious to moisture, smooth and no inside corners for easy cleanup. Durable enough that a dropped block of ice does not damage. I would prefer that no wood (or other material that absorbs water) be used.

Some sort of epoxy based, pre-manufactured panel would be great. Thickened epoxy coves in the corners, sand and paint.

I have never done one of these before. Any suggestions appreciated.

Steve
I know you stated you would prefer no wood, but I have a suggestion that meets all your criteria otherwise. Build a ply box and cover it in fibreglass fabric coated with epoxy. It is a solution we used on our old boat when we needed an icebox insert after adding more insulation. It was totally impervious to water, smooth and very durable. You could thicken the inside corners if you want easy clean up.

Ours simply lifted out for easy removal of melted ice and for cleaning.
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Old 19-01-2014, 18:42   #191
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Re: Happiness is a Warm Spool Gun

duh....Aluminum or stainless for the icebox
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Old 22-01-2014, 21:16   #192
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Re: Happiness is a Warm Spool Gun

Thanks, Andrew, Seaworthy, and funjohnson.

All three of your very good suggestions are for liners that are removable. A great feature but unfortunately an overhead clearance restriction makes this impossible for my situation.

I have decided to go head and glass (with epoxy resin) the liner in place. Using prefabricated panels would save time, but there is a detail around the rim/opening that will work much better if a lay-up is done in place.

While I have been thinking about the liner, I have been working on the carpentry part of the project.

Steve
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Old 04-02-2014, 16:17   #193
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Re: Happiness is a Warm Spool Gun

The wrapping up of these changes to the galley mark the end of the "modifications" that I will make to this boat. From now on, the work will consist of finish/detail work and the finalizing of some systems.

Pic #1 - Overview of Saloon and galley.

Pic #2 - Starboard side showing cook stove in the lowered, non gimbal position.

Pic #3 - Starboard side showing cook stove in the raised, gimbal position. The new stove, being much smaller than the old unit, needed a much smaller counter-top cut-out. A new draw in the open postion.

Pic #4 - Port side of galley is basically unchanged except for new formica, a new edge fiddle and new white paint inside and out.

PIc #5 - The louvered doors are original and they do need a good sanding and refinishing. A job that will have to wait until I am looking for something to do while anchored in nowhere land.

Steve
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Old 04-02-2014, 17:22   #194
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Re: Happiness is a Warm Spool Gun

Looks great, Steve. (As, of course, we've long come to expect!)

Idle question: What do you plan for retention of the drawer?

If you haven't come up with something yet, I gently urge you to consider making it ultra-positive, strong and self-latching; I've been involved with several beautiful sailing boats, thoughtfully built and fitted out by their genius owners, which sustained serious damage to the interior joinery from an instance when a drawer latch failed to hold, or was defeated (for instance by the contents sliding against the internal woodpecker latch, and opening it)*

The traditional "notch drops over a lip" solution seems to work well when new and carefully close-fitting -- but not too close -- but once it gets a bit of play, it can be defeated by the boat dropping and then taking a sideways hit.
It's in any case difficult to combine with roller tracks: I can think of a couple of ways of doing it, but they destroy the simplicity which is the chief advantage of the idea.

In one case I experienced, none of the usual factors were involved.

We had come to anchor in a landlocked anchorage in a remote corner of the world, in settled weather. Not planning to stay for longer than it took to boil the billy and have a bite), and struggling with a chain mismatched to the vertical windlass, we didn't realise we had dropped the anchor on top of a pinnacle.

We neglected to do a proper check of the anchor when, after lunch, we gradually realised what a great spot we'd found, and by a process of creeping increments extended our stay, eventually deciding to stay the night.

An unexpected breeze arrived for an hour or two in the middle of the night, not enough to wake us, but enough to pull the anchor off the summit and waft us into a shallow pool at the head of the anchorage.

We were woken by the boat starting to heel, in a wind didn't anything like sound strong enough to explain even the couple of degrees we were lying off-plumb.

Unfortunately we had arrived fairly near the top of the tide which was now dropping fast, and with over 2m draft we were not quick enough to escape our pool.

In the ensuing gentle laydown, the only damage was from an athwartships cutlery drawer. These had been thoughtfully provided with strong turnbuttons which were routinely locked before doing any sailing, but left unlatched at anchor, or when tied alongside.

We were busy in the engineroom unbolting batteries and transferring tank contents and suchlike, and had overlooked securing the drawers.

They all had a backup, self-latching feature, (a springloaded ramp/hump in the roller tracks, IIRC) but in this one case it was insufficient to cope with the heavy load combined with a 45 degree (or more) heel, particularly given the rollers were free-running.

In the special case we encountered, these turned from an asset to a liability (as assets are sometimes prone to do!)

With the additional factors of being big and heavy-laden, and the considerable delay to its opening due to the self-latching feature, this drawer packed a serious punch and did a fair bit of damage when it eventually did crash open, busting the fallback provision which would normally catch it when fully open and flying across the cabin, and it was sobering to think what it could have done to the youngest crewmember, whose head was at about the exactly wrong height. Luckily he was safely tucked "in his bunk" aft. Actually he was nowhere near his bunk, he was half way up the hull, given the angle of heel ...

So I guess I'm saying, it's not solely big seas and strong winds a joiner/builder/owner has to take into consideration when thinking about retention systems for athwartship drawers.

And I'm by no means assuming you need to be told this, Steve, (looking at the positive catches on the parts of the boats you've grown up with, I'm thinking probably not) but perhaps someone else reading this at some future date might benefit from considering situations outside the usual box. (I'm sure lots of people will be downloading this epic thread of Steve's for future study and dissemination).

I find the easiest way -- which saves having to try to conjure up every conceivable challenging situation in detail -- is to get into the habit, before "signing off" the design for any addition to an ocean-going boat, of doing this:

I visualise the finished boat, fully stowed, being picked up in slings by a crane, rotated to arbitrary random angles (up to and including upside-down), and shaken thoroughly.

Anyone who thinks this is unnecessarily gloomy might want to take a peek at the Yachting Monthly youTube clip showing stuff hurtling around the interior of a yacht rigged with interior cameras which is gently turned over in the sheltered water of a harbour. Luckily the batteries and engine mounts and stove gimbals and other usual culprits stand up to this (relatively easy) test, but there are unexpectedly severe outcomes from lighter items, such as one of the floorboards hitting the saloon table hard enough to bust one of the hinging leaves free.

My personal bete noire is kitchen knives. I have no desire to wake up with one still quivering with its tip buried in the hull lining beside my head - I forget who this happened to.

_ _ _ _

*In this case, the woodpecker latch lined up with a wood-trimmed hole in the drawer front. This is a solution I personally dislike - when sailing in such vessels in bad conditions, it can be scary inserting a finger and lifting your elbow to the required odd angle, while hanging on for grim death with your one free hand (assuming there are strong handholds everywhere, which is usually not the case) and hoping like hell the boat will not choose that moment to fall off a wave and snap your finger like a proverbial fresh carrot.

However it wasn't my boat, but I did suggest and implement a minimal solution to the problem of the contents defeating the woodpecker latch, and that was simply to glue one of those shiny white uPVC 90 degree elbows into a plywood flange with a hole in it, which in turn was screwed down surrounding the woodpecker latch, shrouding it from the contents, and as a fringe benefit making it easier for the unseeing finger to find the catch.
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Old 04-02-2014, 19:16   #195
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Re: Happiness is a Warm Spool Gun

Andrew,

I am definitely planing on something more than the very weak "catches" that are built in to those residential home drawer slides.

The old drawers on the port side are very small and have done well for years and years with little oak wedges glued to the bottom to create the "notch drops over a lip" arrangement that your describe. I believe that this technique will not work for the new drawer because the "slides" do not allow the drawer to be lifted enough to pass over the wedge/notch.

I am thinking that I will make up a flap of springy sheet metal - say about an inch and a half wide. The flap will mount to the inside of the cabinet and stick out of the gap just above the drawer. It will have two bends that will make a Z shaped catch/hook. The last segment will function as the ramp that the drawer face slides under and also the tab that the user will lift (with a finger) to unhook the drawer for opening. It will probably take two hands to open the drawer and that is fine by me.

This solution will be a little crude and clunky for most. But I think it will match the character of many other elements of this project

Steve
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