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Old 21-07-2010, 11:11   #16
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Whats the next project?
He's gonna rebuild his engine.

Using only Molegrips
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Old 21-07-2010, 13:16   #17
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LOL.....The first one I ever did at 14 that was just about right too..

Well first off I want to apologise for not getting shots of the first coat going on...I thought the camera was on, but it was on pause...Bummer!...so you missed out on the coolest part of wood working for me, which is watching the awesome spectacle of transformation from raw wood, come to life with the depth and luster of an applied finish right before your eyes.

Any way It turned out as expected, so I am very pleased...This will be a vast improvement over original and match the rest of the boat's sole very well.


Thanks for watching all these videos.... and stay tuned for the last one, which will be the install into the boat.

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Old 04-08-2010, 16:38   #18
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The yard finally got the engine enclosure buttoned up enough for me to install the galley sole.

So here it is....a vast improvement over the linoleum...Total cost of new Galley sole less then 20 bucks..

Please excuse the rest of the boat...its been through heck....but I'll bring her back in time....
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Old 04-08-2010, 16:43   #19
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Please excuse the rest of the boat...
That's the annoying thing about doing a nice job - makes other stuff look worse
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Old 04-08-2010, 16:52   #20
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Looks great!!! Keep up the good work.
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Old 05-08-2010, 11:14   #21
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Thanks Guys:

Again the whole purpose of me spending so much time doing theses videos was to hopefully inspire some people who have never done any wood working to give it a go....and those that have done some to stretch into something they maybe haven't tried....You don't need a fancy shop..all this could be done on a set of saw horses under a tarp somewhere.

Hopefully using the clock in the videos and showing how little time it really did take will also help convince some to try it. ..I haven't gone back and tallied the time all up but Im guessing around 10 hours total including install....at 90.00 per hour yard rates + 30 to 100 % mark up on materials that's easily a 1000.00 savings with the added reward and satisfaction of knowing you did it yourself....My wife has already lavished me with praise and kisses...I would not have gotten that for writing a check for it..

Let me repeat here that the only power tool you really need for this project if you purchase dimensioned lumber is a table saw.... and a cheap one at that with a good blade in it... every single other process can be done by hand ....that and a few good clamps will give you the same results I did....

Thanks to those whom took the time to post a remark or questions and comments...that means a lot to me, and keeps me going...I always have fun sharing what little I know about something and picking up other tips and tricks along the way....and always hope it truly helps someone else.

Scott
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Old 05-08-2010, 12:11   #22
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Let me repeat here that the only power tool you really need for this project if you purchase dimensioned lumber is a table saw.... and a cheap one at that with a good blade in it... every single other process can be done by hand ....that and a few good clamps will give you the same results I did....
I must confess have been pondering a bit about some new toys Was looking lustfully at a router......but for that I would need a better workbench.........but a table saw would also be nice ....could use to make the workbench

Quote:
Thanks to those whom took the time to post a remark or questions and comments...that means a lot to me, and keeps me going...I always have fun sharing what little I know about something and picking up other tips and tricks along the way....and always hope it truly helps someone else.

Scott
Appreciated very clear and also encouraging - whether that is a good thing (for me) only time will tell..........
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Old 05-08-2010, 15:21   #23
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Thanks for the info about the Mas epoxy, StillRaining. Knowing what sorts of products give good results is a big plus! I have to seal a countertop.

We are local to you but our new-to-us boat (a 1982 Prout) is not, incidentally. The boat is where we move once we PCS to FL.

Would the same sort of thing (as the Mas epoxy) work on vertical surfaces, though? Can't pour it on for sure, so how to get rid of the bubbles... I have to basically strip and redo the interior teak bulkheads, doors and some other woodwork on the boat, in many if not all locations. Some surfaces have been painted (in various colors) and some have been treated badly (big water rings from drinks at parties and God knows what else - not from the previous owner, from a woman who stayed on his boat as a "caretaker" before she was kicked off for not being a good caretaker), and other bulkheads simply seem to have been recoated badly (cloudy?!) or covered with decals.

Since I will have to do the work in situ and with just a few power tools, I would really appreciate your advice: is chemical stripper best (as I suspect)? What kind of sander is best for smoothing things out after the stripping? I have the little triangular-headed one for getting into corners (heck, I even have a Dremel), but what about the larger flat expanses? Your deft touch in the videos is inspirational, but a belt sander would scare the heck out of me, here; I need something forgiving.

Thanks so much for the thread and the videos! Very lovely, and useful to see your techniques on the finishing.
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Old 05-08-2010, 20:38   #24
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Thanks for the info about the Mas epoxy, StillRaining. Knowing what sorts of products give good results is a big plus! I have to seal a countertop.

We are local to you but our new-to-us boat (a 1982 Prout) is not, incidentally. The boat is where we move once we PCS to FL.

Would the same sort of thing (as the Mas epoxy) work on vertical surfaces, though? Can't pour it on for sure, so how to get rid of the bubbles... I have to basically strip and redo the interior teak bulkheads, doors and some other woodwork on the boat, in many if not all locations. Some surfaces have been painted (in various colors) and some have been treated badly (big water rings from drinks at parties and God knows what else - not from the previous owner, from a woman who stayed on his boat as a "caretaker" before she was kicked off for not being a good caretaker), and other bulkheads simply seem to have been re-coated badly (cloudy?!) or covered with decals.

Since I will have to do the work in situ and with just a few power tools, I would really appreciate your advice: is chemical stripper best (as I suspect)? What kind of sander is best for smoothing things out after the stripping? I have the little triangular-headed one for getting into corners (heck, I even have a Dremel), but what about the larger flat expanses? Your deft touch in the videos is inspirational, but a belt sander would scare the heck out of me, here; I need something forgiving.

Thanks so much for the thread and the videos! Very lovely, and useful to see your techniques on the finishing.
Thanks for the kind words AquatiCat....they are greatly appreciated.

I am really no Guru of wood finishing but I would not use epoxy in your situation...the only reason I used it at all is I knew the choice of wood I chose needed encapsulated in it to prevent any water damage and to stabilize it.

It may be an OK choice for your counter tops but personally I would use a spar varnish...Epoxy seems to have some gripe to it...meaning it never seems to get slick to the touch...I don't think that would be a good characteristic for a counter top and certainly not a bulk head.

I personally like a mate finish for the interior of a boat not a high gloss....so believe it or not, I took 000 steel wool to the cured Galley sole finish to dull its brilliance before I installed it..

I do and would use something Like Interlux Gold Spar satin for your interior...and as far as sanding you are correct a belt sander has no place on thin veneers such as mahogany or teak ply wood.

There are many chemical strippers to choose from and heavily painted areas may benefit from them but I would first attempt a heat gun and scraping and then hand sanding using an orbital or in-line auto body sander before trying a striper and your triangle head is ideal for tight areas as you all ready know.....Strippers are great for some things but a real pain in the butt for others, give a small area a try with one and see how it works out...it may be the easier way.

I have use Citrus-Strip with OK results...it is very nice smelling and easy on the lungs/brain for indoors or tight confined areas like a boat but it is really a gooey mess to deal with as all strippers are ...it is not very soluble with anything I have found yet either so it is all about tons of paper towels and scraping.

Hope this helps
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