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Old 27-06-2010, 16:03   #1
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Frozen Mast Roller

My head sail mast roller is frozen and would like to know what has worked for others with roller furling and have not moved there roller often. The roller is on a Morgan 382 and is recessed into the mast. I have moved the roller pin back and forth with a hammer. Lubed up with corrosion X , let set one week, relubed with blaster penetrating fluid. Still frozen. If I drive the roller pin out I will only be able to drive the roller into the mast. I have thought about driving it in a small amount and try pulling back out with a pre-ran rope around the roller but I am afraid I wont be able to pull it back out. Whats the best penetrating fluid for the job? The mast is up and all work being done from a bosun's chair. Thanks
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Old 28-06-2010, 08:51   #2
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Are you talking about a roller-furler on the jib/genny or an in-mast furling system for the mainsail? What is the brand? That will determine if you can disassemble the problem unit, clean it, lubricate it and then re-install.
- - If the "frozen" parts are aluminum on aluminum you have probably got aluminum corrosion growth (the white stuff) and the part is history and needs replacing. If that is the case then you can destructively remove the part and replace it with a new one.
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Old 28-06-2010, 10:07   #3
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Its the halyard roller. I dont know the mast maker. Its what Morgan put on at the factory.
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Old 28-06-2010, 10:36   #4
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I think you must be talking about your masthead sheave.
The only good way of fixing a corroded masthead sheave is to remove it completely and clean it up. A good wire wheel and some sandpaper will usually do the job. Make sure to clean the corrosion from the mast where the pin goes in with a round file and then use neverseize or lanacote on everything.
Sometimes you can get them moving by prying it with a screwdriver, but that will usually scar the sheave and lead to chafe on the halyard.
You really need to take it off and either clean it up or replace it with a new one.
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Old 28-06-2010, 11:13   #5
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I would love to pull it off but I can only drive it deeper into the mast. I was told that ''fluid film'' works good so I will give that a go. Anyway, frozen or not the sails are going up this week. Thanks for you ideas.
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Old 28-06-2010, 12:00   #6
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I have had the same problem and solved it using Moovit by Lloyds. I have used this product to clean and recondition starters, once you get it to move just a little you have it beat. This can be found at some marine stores but always at industrial supply stores. I never leave the dock without a can of this stuff. I am not connected with this organization and learned about it many years ago having having been a commercial fisherman in my past life.
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Old 28-06-2010, 12:09   #7
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Thanks for the ideas. If I knew how to change the thread title to frozen masthead sheave, I would. A sheave (pronounced "shiv") is a wheel or roller with a groove along its edge for holding a belt, rope or cable. ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheaves - Definition in context
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Old 28-06-2010, 13:12   #8
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Does your mast have a "cap piece?" that is a whole casting that is mounted on top of the mast tube and contains the various sheaves for your halyards.
- - If so there is normally a large stainless pin that goes through the masthead cap and the sheave. There are sometimes cotter pins holding the Pin from coming out. If so, remove one or both of the cotter pins and use a socket wrench extension bar or similar type round bar to pound the pin out of the masthead cap.
- - If the sheave is mounted in a slot/hole cut into the face of the mast tube then there is normally a stainless steel metal "box" (sometimes a whole casting) that is bolted/riveted to the face of the mast tube. The box holds the sheave and its mounting pin/arbor. You remove the bolts/rivets and pry the whole box containing the sheave from the mast tube. Then disassemble the sheave and repair or replace it.
- - On the bulk of boats the masthead halyard sheaves are metal with a "oilite" bearing. This is a solid bronze short length of tube which has been impregnated with oil and is the "bearing" that the sheave rotates on the pin/arbor. It is normal for these "oilite" bearings to loose their impregnated oil and then bind or freeze on the pin. After you get the sheave out you can have a new oilite bearing press-fit into it - or - find a "ball-bearing" sheave of the same size - diameter, width, arbor hole - and use it instead of an oilite bearing sheave. I did that on my primary halyard sheaves for the main and jib.
- - Basically remove the whole sheave from the masthead cap piece by pounding out the bearing pin or removing the whole sheave mounting box from the mast tube face is the normal process. Then repair or replace the binding sheave.
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Old 28-06-2010, 20:34   #9
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Every once in a while it may be necessary to hire a professional. This may be one of those times.
I recommend that you ask around and find a reputable rigger in your area and have him/her address the sheave problem.
You might be well advised to have an inspection done at the same time.
Chances are if you have frozen sheaves, you have other issues that you might want to know about.
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Old 28-06-2010, 23:17   #10
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The last professional that was hired didnít find the frozen shive. I will work on my own boat and get to know it better in the process. Thank you.
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