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Old 02-05-2013, 19:14   #1
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Filling old timber

Hi All,
I have an old timber boat which has some rot dry rot which I have cleaned out. The problem I have is in the past I have filled large holes with epoxy fillers but after a time cracks appear between the wood and the filler due to expansion as I am in the tropics. Does anyone know of a flexible type of filler or another way of repairing large holes which have full sun on them other than cutting out sections and replacing them with new timber. Any advise would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 02-05-2013, 19:28   #2
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Re: Filling old timber

The standard way seems to be to replace the rotted wood with a 'dutchman'--a little piece of new wood glued tightly in. There is a WEST brand epoxy called G-flex which is supposed to move with the wood and stay flexible. The best way to keep wood protected is with paint, but the tropics spells death to wooden boats. Even in cooler climates, the amount of maintenance that goes into keeping wooden boats afloat is staggering.
Good luck.
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Old 02-05-2013, 20:27   #3
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Re: Filling old timber

Quote:
Originally Posted by Benz View Post
The standard way seems to be to replace the rotted wood with a 'dutchman'--a little piece of new wood glued tightly in. There is a WEST brand epoxy called G-flex which is supposed to move with the wood and stay flexible. The best way to keep wood protected is with paint, but the tropics spells death to wooden boats. Even in cooler climates, the amount of maintenance that goes into keeping wooden boats afloat is staggering.
Good luck.
That's not true at all. They require much more maintenance but it's hardly working in the coal mines. A few weeks every year focusing on some projects and things stay in ship shape.

And honestly I think having so much wood (decks, cabin top, cockpit, rudder, spars) has motivated me to keep the rest of my boat simple. I do just as much maintenance as the next guy but he's futzing with his AGM batteries while I'm caulking a seam.
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Old 03-05-2013, 22:52   #4
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Re: Filling old timber

Well said, rebel heart. I too am happily joined at the hip to a wooden boat, and what gives me the most satisfaction is learning new wood tricks and applying them to the boat and realizing that you don't have to be perfect. I feel like I can fix a wood boat better than a fiberglass boat, and I'm not much of a carpenter.
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Old 04-05-2013, 02:53   #5
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Re: Filling old timber

What's wrong with cutting out and replacing with new timber? If you rough shape before fitting can finish off / fair when in place......not to say can't use epoxy as a filler to cover up a few blemishes / help acheive the initial fit......results might not be cabinet maker quality of finish, but where paint is involved that don't really matter.
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Old 04-05-2013, 03:46   #6
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Re: Filling old timber

pouring in hot bitumen is quite common in colder climates.

portland cement is a great filler! and cheap!

the greek and turkish fishermen used to use pine resin with sawdust added,but these days sikaflex is so much easier.

in east africa coconut coir,limestone powder ,coconut oil and water is used for caulking,then overcoated with tar.

in the carbbean,polystyrene melted with petrol makes a paste that can be used as a filler,

also in west africa,but with fibers from baobab tree seed pods crushed added
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Old 04-05-2013, 09:44   #7
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Re: Filling old timber

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That's not true at all.
There's a big difference between an old wooden boat and a FRP one with a lot of wood trim.
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Old 05-05-2013, 14:24   #8
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Re: Filling old timber

Hi Rebel Heart,
If your hull were made of wood instead of fiberglass, you'd spend a lot more time maintaining it or it would quickly disintegrate. Unless it were Burmese Teak, which the OP likely does not have, since he's discussing dry rot. But I'm glad that you can rejoice in keeping your trim and spars tidy--one should enjoy his boat maintenance duties.
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Old 05-05-2013, 16:40   #9
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Re: Filling old timber

I've been using concentrated ethylene glycol (not propylene glycol) where ever I find a bit of rot. Yes, I have used a bit of wood on Boracay.

It seems to soak in very well and the wood round it goes hard.

I've only found a few small patches so haven't needed to fill, but if I did I'd cut a piece of wood to about the right size and epoxy it in after the ethylene glycol had dried out.

I'm sure everyone knows that ethylene glycol is very poisonous but has a sweetish smell so great caution is needed for it's storage and use.
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