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Old 12-05-2007, 19:07   #16
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Dude!!! what the heck is wrong with you. Epoxy tar is Epoxy tar. It is not Epoxy resin. It is not Epoxy undercoat. It is like Cheese. You can have Swiss cheese and Blue vain and colby and so on. But the only comminality is that they are cheeses. They all tast different. Epoxy is the same. They are all different. The only similarity is the fact that they are thermosetting plastics. Mate, NOTHING will stick to Epoxy tar. It has nothing to do with the Epoxy. It is the Tar that is the issue.
No better way to make a fool of yourself than to not give all the facts in the very beginning.
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Old 12-05-2007, 23:05   #17
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mate thats a bit harsh there alan, brent has played with steel boats, he just needs to meet a nice person building a cat with epoxy to convince him of the error of his ways, i must be very new as i havent even heard of epoxy tar, it doesnt doound very nice though( asphalt of the ocean is what comes to mind
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Old 13-05-2007, 02:57   #18
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Coal Tar Epoxies are essentially a catalyzed mix of bituminous coal tar and epoxy resins.
I successfully used Interlux “VC-Tar”, on 10 y/o “sanded, but not stripped” hull, and successfully overcoat with an anti-fouling paint, in the late 70's.
I suspect the CTE’s have been superceded by more modern epoxy formulations.
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Old 13-05-2007, 23:24   #19
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Yeah I suppose I was a little. It was a tuff day at the war. I have modified my post and I apoligise.

There is an important point to make here. When discussing Epoxies, it is important to understand what is being discussed. When I think of epoxy, I am presuming we are discussing pure epoxy, which would be pure laminating Resin. Anything else is modified and acts or behaves very differently. So clarity by saying exactly what coating we are discussing goes a long way to giving an accurate answer.
Epoxy tar is a very old paint system. Maybe one of the very earliest to be ever used that included epoxy. The stuff is increadible in it's ability to adhere, seal, and protect. The big problem is, it is a very difficult coating to get anything else to adhere to. Anti-foul paint would be OK, but any other paint can have problems. Even wet on wet can cause difficulties, as the tar can bleed through primers and top coats. Once the tar has bled through into another paint like the primer, you can not stop it. Any further coats will have the tar come though as the solvent readily and easily breaks the tar down and causes it to bleed very quickly.
The other issue is trying to remove it if you ever need/want. It is not easy.
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Old 14-05-2007, 13:06   #20
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Nothing will stick to epoxy tar? Total bullshit. Oil based enamel has been sticking to my epoxy tar for the last 23 years and 6 pacific crossings. It only sticks because I put it wet on wet. People who tried other methods had no such luck.
I have suggested that as there are many different types of epoxy, that one should try an experimental patch before doing a huge area. If it works for the particular epoxy you are using, then you have saved yourself a huge amount of labour and time. Go back and read my messages as many times as it takes for it to sink in( obviously many times in your case) .
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Old 14-05-2007, 13:07   #21
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Epoxy tar only bleeds thru for the first couple of weeks. After that it stops.
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Old 14-05-2007, 13:11   #22
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Once you have given the epoxy tar's colour enamel topcoat a couple of weeks to properly harden you can use whatever colour you want over it and it won't bleed thru.I have white paint over epoxy tar, and there is no bleed thru, at least not in the last 23 years.
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Old 14-05-2007, 19:00   #23
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EVIDENCE

Quote:
Originally Posted by Louis Riel
Once you have given the epoxy tar's colour enamel topcoat a couple of weeks to properly harden you can use whatever colour you want over it and it won't bleed thru.I have white paint over epoxy tar, and there is no bleed thru, at least not in the last 23 years.
Brent
Yo Brent,

remember "A picture's worth a thousand words."?

Being a photographer of one kind or another, it occurs to me that a good quality, well-lit, close-up photo of this 23-year-old finish would substantiate your claim, if you wished to do so.

Any aid can be helpful when passing along information regarding methods whose performance is claimed to be vastly superior to what some of us have grown to expect. Additionally, a few of us have been taught that fairing and filling and sanding and coating and sanding and recoating... is the way to achieve a proper finish on a yacht. The creative evolution of marine coating systems will set us free. Eventually. We hope.

Can we post photos here? Of course we must--I just haven't tried it. Maybe someone will jump in helpfully here.

best, andy
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Old 14-05-2007, 19:09   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terra Nova
Can we post photos here? Of course we must--I just haven't tried it. Maybe someone will jump in helpfully here.
It's easy. When you're replying to a thread in the advanced editor, not the quick reply you see on the thread, scroll down a bit and you'll see a button for "manage attachments". Clicking on that button will pop up a screen that'll allow you to browse for files on your hard drive or enter a URL to an existing image. Browsing and uploading files creates a linked thumbnail image in your message. Linking to a URL will upload the image automatically and tag it to your post.

Alternatively you can click the "insert image" icon on the second line of the toolbar above the box where you're typing. This will open a pop up to link to an image which will appear full sized in your post. The easies way is to try it. YOu can always correct it if you don't like the results.

The third way is to open your image gallery and upload images there. Below the picture in the gallery you'll find the bulletin board coding to insert that image in your post.
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Old 15-05-2007, 00:10   #25
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[quote=knottybuoyz]It's easy. . quote]

Yo Rick,

thanks, if you're right that it's easy, a photo of mine should appear here. This type shows off the fine finish on a racing Star.

best, andy

edit: Hey! It works!
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Old 25-05-2007, 15:56   #26
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Don't have a digital camera , nor scanner. Anyone who does is welcome to take and post the photo.
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Old 25-05-2007, 16:23   #27
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photo

Quote:
Originally Posted by Louis Riel
Don't have a digital camera , nor scanner. Anyone who does is welcome to take and post the photo.
Brent
Yo Brent,

you don't need a digital camera or a scanner. Take the roll of film from a disposable camera to your local 1-hour photo. Ask them for a CD. Simple, cheap, easy.

best, andy
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Old 25-05-2007, 19:15   #28
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Brent, next time you find yourself (and boat) anywhere in California, let me know, I would be more than happy to take a few pictures, and would enjoy debating the benefits/properties of epoxy with you as well. I might even spring for th beer One thing you and I seem to agree on is that anyone undertaking one of these methods should thoroughly test the options before investing the time and money to do a whole project with one method or the other.
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