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Old 19-05-2008, 12:25   #1
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engine mount bolt problem

The forward port mount of my Yanmar had a coach bolt through one of it's holes into the glassed in timber bearer and it has become so loose in the hole it doesn't hold. I thought of making a steel sleeve with an internal thread and epoxying that in the hole so I can bolt the mount down.
Any ideas welcome

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Old 19-05-2008, 15:17   #2
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Do you mean a lag bolt?

What you have in mind might work but it would be better to through bolt your engine mounts. West System has information on epoxying bolts into wood.


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Old 19-05-2008, 16:00   #3

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In the States we call it a "carriage bolt". There's a rounded head, with no slot, no nothing, and the shank has been squared up underneath the head so that as is pulls into a piece of wood, the square shank cuts in and locks the head from turning. The head just looks like a rounded rivet head, ornamental for "coach work".

All the turning is down from the nut alone.

You could turn this around: Use another coach bolt, or ANY bolt, and epoxy the head of the bolt into the timber, so it sticks up through the mounting foot. After the epoxy dries, just add a regular locking nut and tighten down as needed.

Incidentally, engine mounts, like all rubber parts, "should" be replaced after five years. The new mounts will be more supple and absorb more vibration, and of course be less likely to fail. Since one is already unbolted...[g]....
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Old 21-05-2008, 04:42   #4
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Would Tee Nuts (pictured), or Threaded Inserts work for you?
Drill to tight fit, epoxy hole, & drive in.
As noted, carriage & coach bolts are the same thing.
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