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Old 04-11-2005, 12:32   #1
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emergency repair

i am curious to know what people would include in their (short) list of out-of-the-ordinary tools and materials good for making emergency repairs.
i thought this thread might give me ideas on how others plan, or goodies they now carry due to a past problem.
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Old 04-11-2005, 13:32   #2
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One of those tootsie rolls of epoxy. Cut off what you need, knead it to mix and apply. Cures underwater. (at least that's what the manufacturer says). Sink strainer assembly, had one rust out , luckily I had a couple in the basement from a kitchen reno. Bicycle inner tubes. Hinges and pins for Lewmar hatches. Anything shiny that I find on the ground in a boatyard.
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Old 04-11-2005, 14:00   #3
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i know this is kind of like the "1001 things to do with a coathanger" bit. whats with the innertube ?
ever heard the "condom over the valve of spare propane bottle" bit ?
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Old 04-11-2005, 14:56   #4
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capt lar,

Use the inner tube rubber to stop water coming in when repacking the stuffing box. Just wrap around the shaft log. Also useful for protecting stainless when putting clamps on. Used to clamp crutches onto my stern rail with u bolts to hold the mast when going through the N.Y. State Canals. Have used it to stop chafe on some parts of the engine hoses where runs are tight. Have made a shroud to cover electrical shore plug with it. (not approved by any electrical authority). A thousand and one uses.
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Old 04-11-2005, 19:31   #5
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Jury-rigging stuff

I've always carried a box of various pieces of metals. Steel, aluminum and stainless. Angles, flats, boxes, channels and I-beam cross sections. They may not exceed 12 inches long yet can be cut up and formed to solve problems only you might visualize when challenged to do when it comes to doing or dieing (forget the dieing).

In conjunction with that are various files, hacksaw blades, a sabersaw and a battery operated radial saw, which with a thin carbide blade will cut all of the metals up to 1/2 inch thick if you are patient. Yes, you also need taps and dies along with various lengths of bolts at least to 1/2 inch in diameter. Forget not to include 6 inch, or longer, 1/4 inch diameter fasteners (you don't yet know what for). Carry the biggest vice that you can. If you are limited carry at least 1/4 X 20, 3/8 X 16, and 1/2 X 13 taps along with fasteners (don't forget to do the same in metric common sizes...others might give advice here).

One of the most difficult problems is drilling holes to accommodate those big fasteners. You need an inverter capable of driving the largest 1/2 inch chuck drill having a very low spindle speed (forget the battery operated drills, they don't have enough horsepower). Why? The sea is an unforgiving place which requires STRONG fixes to temporarly let you survive those inadequate materials which failed in the first place. You can't fix things on the boat with 1/8 inch fasteners that require a strength to survive temporarily the sea shoving a 40 foot boat around like it is a sausage in a toilet.

High quality pieces of wood of various lengths and sizes can be stored under matresses and against bulkheads in areas not otherwise thought of if you imagine it. The bigger and longer the better. Try to have at least some 8 foot pieces of 2inch by 2 inch wood (or larger) and, if possible, metal, somewhere.
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Old 04-11-2005, 19:38   #6
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Splash Zone. (underwater curing epoxy).
Duct tape
Bailing wire (stainless)
Misc. metal/wood, including some sheet metal for sleeves
shave head rivets, and rivet tool
Lots of fasteners
A vice, and files.
Not much you can not fix or fabricate with these items and some basic hand tools.
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Old 06-11-2005, 17:51   #7
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I heard this somwhere....and always thought it was a good idea...a one gallon bucket of roofing plastick...the black sticky stuff used on house roofs for repairs...........a double hand full of that stuff buttered on a flat board shoved up against a crack in the hull.....a couple of bolts too hold it in place........................or a brace on the inside of a hull holding a patch in place....
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Old 07-11-2005, 17:57   #8
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Hey! You guys forgot to mention scraps of Starboard! You know, "plastic lumber" !!! Wouldn't think of leaving without it.

Bob & Lynn

L S/V Sew Good
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Old 07-11-2005, 18:07   #9
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i am doing my first small project with starboard. interesting stuff. i actuall went to the marina to scrounge a scrap of teak for new keel on dink. my garage has better pickings than their shop. sign of the times.
they say the problem is nothing sticks to it, so bedding will be interesting.
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Old 18-03-2007, 15:55   #10
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We were headed down the Kennebec River (Maine) to my ocean mooring one spring on my 25' Hunter, using the 10 h.p. outboard. I went below and was completely surprized and very concerned to find water sloshing around an inch deep everywhere.

The bilge pump quickly helped, but the water was still coming in. We finally tracked it to one of the cockpit drain hoses, it had failed with age. When using the motor, the stern settled enough to put the thru-hull below water level. What to do?

My friend's teenage son found my "storm" candles and asked if one of them would help. It was a perfect fit! I simply lowered myself over the stern and shoved the tapered 1/2" candle into the tru-hull; it sealed perfectly.

I always keep tapered candles on board and a couple of those toilet flange beeswax rings you get at the hardware store for a dollar. You never know...
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Old 18-03-2007, 16:57   #11
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you need tape!

We carry several rolls of Holt Allen “Sail Repair Bandage” – West Marine model 229750. We used this to repair a Genoa that was in the process of ripping, while we were under passage. No sewing required! It can be applied to wet canvas and you can sew right through it when the time comes to make a more permanent repair. It really sticks and in our experience, was murder to remove when we finally reached a sail repair shop.

We also carry self-vulcanizing rubber tape. This can be used to make a temporary repair to an engine hose and is also great for sealing electrical connections.

Ed
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Old 18-03-2007, 18:49   #12
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I've fabricated a fan belt out of my wifes pantyhose, does that count?
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Old 18-03-2007, 18:57   #13
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Dana - Actually, I tried that ... didn't work worth a damn (Kai Nui will attest to that). If you have a small engine... maybe it would work.

To add to the list ... cable cutters ... able to handle the largest diameter rigging you have.
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Old 19-03-2007, 03:09   #14
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I would suggest a hand operated drill,just incase the power goes down.Drill bits should be the new titanium coated ones.I would also like to know what sort of stockings Kai Nui's wearing and what Thomas was doing at the time with his big engine.<GR>Mudnut.
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Old 19-03-2007, 04:09   #15
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In no particular order:

- Threaded Rod (1/4" Dia x 36" L, & 3/8" Dia - Redi-Rod, All-Thread, etc) c/w Nuts, Washers (regular flat, large fender, & locking)

- Tie Wraps (Large & Smaller, Black)

- Seizing Wire (Monel or S/S)

- 3M “5200" (or 4100 for the fainthearted)

- U-Bolt Cable Clips (sized to your rigging wires)

- Tapes (Vinyl Electrical, Self-Fusing)

- Hose Clamps (sized to your hoses, AND assorted, small through very large)

- Small Stuff Line (3/16" Flag Halyard)

There are certain items that I consider foreseeable expendables*, for which we should inventory specific replacements. Items, in this category, should never require delving into emergency repair kits (they are in routine maintenance inventory), and shouldn’t require applying McGyver-like ingenuity (like the infamous panty-hose alternator/pump belt).
Ie: BELTS (engine, pump, autopilot, etc), IMPELLERS (pump), FILTRES & FLUIDS (fuel & filtres, oil & filtres, air-filtres, anti-freeze), et al.
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