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Old 01-03-2013, 18:44   #31
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Re: Drilling SS question.

Whenever posibile use a drill press with a feed system and use semi slow speed and a semi fast down feed ! and lots of fluid of some sort, I like water and soluble oil mixture. SS is really no different then drilling any steel, if ya want a round hole start small and use a second pass with the right size. always worked for me
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Old 01-03-2013, 18:53   #32
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Re: Drilling SS question.

I always sharpen my own drills. Its really not that hard to do with a little practice.
Drilling SS will give you a bit of that practice.

I always have my Dremel with the reinforced cut off wheels handy for this.
No generator needed as a 12 volt 100 watt inverter works just fine with the Dremel.
With and extention cord you can sharpen drills anywhere on the boat you choose.
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Old 01-03-2013, 18:58   #33
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Re: Drilling SS question.

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Originally Posted by Blue Crab View Post
Wot?

I tried this inadvertently with a shirt tail once. Too bad it's not on video.

Next time just use a small part of the shirt tail

A long time ago a mate tried it using his hair, didn't start off so good but once the hair was ripped from his scalp, it worked a lot better. We laughed back then but now... perhaps we now would be concerned for his health and feelings ... no perhaps we would just smile and get him a cap to wear for a short while
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Old 01-03-2013, 19:44   #34
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Re: Drilling SS question.

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Originally Posted by boden36 View Post
The best drilling and tapping fluid I have ever used is called "Tap Magic" . You should be able to get on eBay or large engineering supply shops. I have quite a few cutting lubricants in the workshop, and nothing comes close.

Regards,
Richard.
I have a whole gallon unopened. Ya want to buy it? $50. It's good for small drills and taps but it would be costly to use it on anything bigger then 1/2".
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Old 01-03-2013, 20:05   #35
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Re: Drilling SS question.

Try not to use those cemical cutting and tapping fluids in a inclosed area ! the fumes from them can be really bad if ya inhale to much of them !! be careful ! just my 2 cents
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Old 01-03-2013, 20:38   #36
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Re: Drilling SS question.

To make it clear, heat is bad. That's what hardens the stainless steel. Use lots of oil, I use cutting oil (from the pipe section), and keep the bit cool. I take frequent rests to let the bit cool. When going slowly, you can feel when the bit bites. I don't think it requires huge pressure, more "touch". You can feel the difference when the bit gets dull, then start up with a new bit.
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Old 01-03-2013, 21:21   #37
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Re: Drilling SS question.

Someone posted this earlier but it seems to lost in the mass of replies

You want to aim for having two spirals of the waste metal curling off the bit - no shavings, no fine metal dust, no chips - just a long spiral.

Then you know you have the speed and pressure right

While heat is a killer - for the bit and the stock, SS unlike like mild steel (or Al) does not transfer heat quickly; therefore if you can keep the bit cutting into fresh stock (thus producing the spirals), you are by default cutting into cooler metal (relatively speaking). Once you stop doing this (and so start making chips etc), the heat has just enough time to penetrate further and work hardening the remainder of the stock below the hole.
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Old 01-03-2013, 21:44   #38
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I knew this machinist he was really really old. Very experienced. The old men you guys know are nothing compared to this guy, I bet you don't know him. Anyways, he is so good with stainless steel that he can just bite a hole in it with his bare teeth! Cobalt, hah!

Okay, here is the tool you need.. and yes it is battery powered!
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Old 02-03-2013, 05:35   #39
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Re: Drilling SS question.

This thread can be defined as a collection of mostly bad information. So, I may as well throw my opinion in too. The types of work that we do can be seen at Stampede Die Corp

-Clamp the bow roller in place with high quality C-clamps and drill through the mounting holes. This will prevent drill from wandering around and your holes will end up where you want them.

-304 stainless has a "surface footage" for machining of 60. This number is needed to calculate the proper RPM. The technically correct RPM and feed rate for a .375" drill is 610 RPM at about 3 inches per minute. These numbers would be used if you had access to a CNC type machine or drill press. With a hand drill you will be significantly slower. I would use 180-200 RPM.

-Push as hard as you can! You won't be able to provide enough force to maximize the capabilities of the tooling no matter what you do.

-Flood the work area with water. Literally open up a garden hose on the drill point when cutting. The reason is to keep the area as cool as possible. There isn't any reason to use any type of oil. Oil is most often used for the lubrication properties. Save the oil for threading operations.

-Use a standard high speed steel drill bit from Morse or Precision Twist. A split point drill has a longer cutting edge by design. A longer cutting edge will require more power to drill the hole. They are great in machines. They don't have any place in a hand drill.

-Don't drill a pilot hole. You will be tempted. Drilling a .375" hole, by hand, through stainless is going to suck. A pilot hole is only going to give the larger drills something to grab. Your wrists will not appreciate the pilot holes and you will be resharpening drills much more often. Also, using a split point in a pilot hole situation completely defeats the purpose of the grind on the drill.

-Bring a hand full of drills. When the drill breaks through the back side of the work piece there is a good chance of the tool chipping or cracking. I would bring six drills to drill four holes. Or bring a pedestal grinder and resharpen often.
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Old 02-03-2013, 08:21   #40
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Re: Drilling SS question.

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Originally Posted by s/v Jedi View Post
I knew this machinist he was really really old. Very experienced. The old men you guys know are nothing compared to this guy, I bet you don't know him. Anyways, he is so good with stainless steel that he can just bite a hole in it with his bare teeth! Cobalt, hah!

Okay, here is the tool you need.. and yes it is battery powered!
A mag drill on SS or a boat other then steel?



I'm going to need my foul weather boots now, it's getting deep in here.
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Old 02-03-2013, 09:04   #41
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Re: Drilling SS question.

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Originally Posted by Anonymous7500 View Post
This thread can be defined as a collection of mostly bad information. So, I may as well throw my opinion in too. The types of work that we do can be seen at Stampede Die Corp

Gotta disagree here - IMO most of the info is pretty good

-Clamp the bow roller in place with high quality C-clamps and drill through the mounting holes. This will prevent drill from wandering around and your holes will end up where you want them.

Agreed

-304 stainless has a "surface footage" for machining of 60. This number is needed to calculate the proper RPM. The technically correct RPM and feed rate for a .375" drill is 610 RPM at about 3 inches per minute. These numbers would be used if you had access to a CNC type machine or drill press. With a hand drill you will be significantly slower. I would use 180-200 RPM.

Perhaps for .375" but much slower for the final hole size (IMO)

-Push as hard as you can! You won't be able to provide enough force to maximize the capabilities of the tooling no matter what you do.

Agreed

-Flood the work area with water. Literally open up a garden hose on the drill point when cutting. The reason is to keep the area as cool as possible. There isn't any reason to use any type of oil. Oil is most often used for the lubrication properties. Save the oil for threading operations.

Hmm... sort of agree but I hate freely flowing water around a mains powered hand tool - might be OK for 110 V but not so much for our 240 V. If you can achieve enough pressure to ensure a decent feed rate to create spiralling swarf, then you don't need so much cooling - but I guess it can't hurt if you can manage to keep the water out of the drill.

-Use a standard high speed steel drill bit from Morse or Precision Twist. A split point drill has a longer cutting edge by design. A longer cutting edge will require more power to drill the hole. They are great in machines. They don't have any place in a hand drill.

Partially agree

-Don't drill a pilot hole. You will be tempted. Drilling a .375" hole, by hand, through stainless is going to suck. A pilot hole is only going to give the larger drills something to grab. Your wrists will not appreciate the pilot holes and you will be resharpening drills much more often. Also, using a split point in a pilot hole situation completely defeats the purpose of the grind on the drill.

Disagree, pilot hole (IMHO) is almost a must. Grabbing will not occur if using a cloth swatch as described in one of earlier posts in this thread. It is always possible to get some grabbing when you are approaching the final breakthrough but this will happen pilot hole or not. If one can't drill a pilot hole successfully, then one shouldn't try drilling the final hole. Remember we are talking hand held tooling here.

-Bring a hand full of drills. When the drill breaks through the back side of the work piece there is a good chance of the tool chipping or cracking. I would bring six drills to drill four holes. Or bring a pedestal grinder and resharpen often.
You are kidding right. 2 drills each of pilot and final size should be ample if you reasonable skill at drilling SS, 3 if you are getting up to speed; anymore shows (IMO), that you should get someone else to do it for you. OK I accept that a rank novice could use dozens but to suggest that 6 is required for 4 holes is (again IMO) pure nonsense. I am assuming that quality USA bits are at least as good as quality Aussie bits

I o agree that resharpening is a good idea but I would just use an angle grinder if at the dock rather than managing a pedstal grinder
Mate, I am sure you guys turn out very good work but the OP's work here isn't a major issue if he follows the general advice running through the entire thread.
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Old 02-03-2013, 09:32   #42
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I use 'Rapid Tap' heavy duty cutting fluid, it is a small yellow can 4fl oz or 118ml.It has worked well for me , drilling or cutting threads. Cheers
Use the cutting fluid, new cobalt bit, punch a starting spot and go for it. As said before let the drill do the work.
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Old 02-03-2013, 09:47   #43
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Re: Drilling SS question.

Huge difference drilling stainless with a drill bit and handheld, especially if the holes are horizontal. Good cobalt bits, drilling fluid, very slow, all the pressure you can muster - and lots of patience.
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Old 02-03-2013, 09:49   #44
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pirate Re: Drilling SS question.

Wonder what happened to the titanium guy? He'd have something to add.
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Old 02-03-2013, 10:51   #45
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Re: Drilling SS question.

I like to fashion a drill press of sorts by taking a pipe or something similiar and a piece of line lashed to a cleat or something to hold the outboard end stationary This will allow you to get the required point pressure to get the consistent curly cues coming off the bit. Dont know about a drill bit for each hole. Me and a friend once drilled all his chainplates in 304 with one bit. cutting oil and consistent correct point pressure was the key.
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