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Old 13-01-2014, 19:52   #16
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Re: chimney hole angst!

Why are they called Charlie Nobles
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Old 13-01-2014, 19:57   #17
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Re: chimney hole angst!

Charlie Noble from wikipedia:

"Charlie Noble is the smoke stack on a ship's galley.
Around 1850, a British merchant service captain, Charles Noble, upon discovering that the stack of his ship's galley was made of copper, ordered that it be kept bright. Then onwards, the ship's crew then started referring to the galley smokestack as the "Charlie Noble"."

It is on the internet, guess it must be true
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Old 13-01-2014, 23:01   #18
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Re: chimney hole angst!

Quote:
Originally Posted by foojin View Post
Okay, I am going to put a five-inch chimney hole into my cabin roof. I am. I mean it this time. I have a jigsaw, removed the headliner and drawn a circle on the fibreglass... I am...

But if anyone can anyone suggest a website to give me more confidence in what I am about to do it would be appreciated.
A holesaw is the best tool to use. As posted you will need a long pilot bit in the holesaw. You might drill a hole in the center with a drill bit the same size as the saw's pilot bit first to stop the saw wandering.

You can rent tools at Home Depot.
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Old 13-01-2014, 23:33   #19
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Re: chimney hole angst!

I have a 5" hole I wish I could send you (no longer a stove there).

The results with a hole saw are very pleasing, but be sure your large drill has a lateral extension handle to help concentrate the torque- otherwise you'll be spinning on your coach roof. It's definitely a two-handle operation and starting with the clutch set soft and slowly tightening the clutch helps.
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Old 14-01-2014, 00:18   #20
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Re: chimney hole angst!

If you use a regular hole saw as opposed to a carbide abrasive, start the cut in reverse on the finish side to prevent gelcoat chipping. Finish the cut from the opposite side if possible to prevent blow out.
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Old 14-01-2014, 02:15   #21
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Re: chimney hole angst!

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Originally Posted by a64pilot View Post
I triple the hole saw, best way to get an absolutely round / square hole!
I have yet to see a hole saw that will cut a square hole.
I could use one though.
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Old 14-01-2014, 07:45   #22
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Re: chimney hole angst!

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Originally Posted by Strait Shooter View Post
I have yet to see a hole saw that will cut a square hole.
I could use one though.


It's called a mortising machine.





Mortising Machine from Sears.com
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Old 14-01-2014, 08:57   #23
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Re: chimney hole angst!

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Originally Posted by minaret View Post
It's called a mortising machine.





Mortising Machine from Sears.com
As a cabinet/furniture maker, I'm familiar with mortising techniques. I just didn't realize there was a hole saw to do it with.

It was a tongue in cheek comment. I forgot you were in this conversation. Silly me!
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Old 14-01-2014, 09:09   #24
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Re: chimney hole angst!

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Originally Posted by Strait Shooter View Post
As a cabinet/furniture maker, I'm familiar with mortising techniques. I just didn't realize there was a hole saw to do it with.

It was a tongue in cheek comment. I forgot you were in this conversation. Silly me!



Yeah, it's definitely not a hole saw. Wouldn't work here anyway. Just trying to inform and entertain!
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Old 14-01-2014, 09:15   #25
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Re: chimney hole angst!

Damn, I drilled that hole three times now and its still too big...... LOL
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Old 14-01-2014, 11:06   #26
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Re: chimney hole angst!

As minaret stated drill down through the deck, but stop short of breaking through. Go below and use the center hole to drill up from the bottom. Be wary that when it meets the upper cut the drill will have a tendency to bind. Go slow. Save the plug, you never know you or a future owner may want to lose the stove. Although I can't see that happening. I have a Cole Stove, burns wood and/or charcoal.
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Old 14-01-2014, 11:24   #27
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Re: chimney hole angst!

Quote:
Originally Posted by mitiempo View Post
A holesaw is the best tool to use. As posted you will need a long pilot bit in the holesaw. You might drill a hole in the center with a drill bit the same size as the saw's pilot bit first to stop the saw wandering...
Quote:
Originally Posted by minaret View Post
If you use a regular hole saw as opposed to a carbide abrasive, start the cut in reverse on the finish side to prevent gelcoat chipping. Finish the cut from the opposite side if possible to prevent blow out.
Looks like you have everything now, all need is to go buy some courage....

+ 1 on the long pilot bit and starting in reverse for a few revolutions. The technique is to start with the hole saw vertical, so you will start cutting on only one side and as it goes down, the hole saw will progressively bite the other side and start to cut so you'll need to reverse and forward until the saw bites the entire cut. I hope you understand this very important point.

One thing no one touched on is how did you get to the 5 inches diameter?
It may be obvious but remember that you'll need the pipe diameter plus the heat shield plus insulation plus the sealing of the fiberglass and core. Once you cut, its hard to enlarge and still look pretty.
So plan and measure 3 times and cut once.

Also, after the cut, plan how you will be able to keep the water out, so use the appropriate heat-tolerant seal and epoxy the screws holding the flange to the deck.

Good luck.
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Old 14-01-2014, 13:02   #28
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Re: chimney hole angst!

Quote:
Originally Posted by SVTatia View Post
Looks like you have everything now, all need is to go buy some courage....

+ 1 on the long pilot bit and starting in reverse for a few revolutions. The technique is to start with the hole saw vertical, so you will start cutting on only one side and as it goes down, the hole saw will progressively bite the other side and start to cut so you'll need to reverse and forward until the saw bites the entire cut. I hope you understand this very important point.

One thing no one touched on is how did you get to the 5 inches diameter?
It may be obvious but remember that you'll need the pipe diameter plus the heat shield plus insulation plus the sealing of the fiberglass and core. Once you cut, its hard to enlarge and still look pretty.
So plan and measure 3 times and cut once.

Also, after the cut, plan how you will be able to keep the water out, so use the appropriate heat-tolerant seal and epoxy the screws holding the flange to the deck.

Good luck.

I bet this poor guy just THOUGHT he had "chimney hole angst" before he asked us! Now it's for real...
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Old 14-01-2014, 13:07   #29
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Re: chimney hole angst!

You don't have to drill multiple pilot holes, making the job way more complicated than it needs to be. Once you've sited were the opening needs to be use a compass and draw the size circle you need, drill a pilot hole the size of the blade you will be using and cut the hole. A little trick I used was to tape a garbage bag under the area I was cutting to catch all the saw dust so it doesn't end up all over the cabin interior. The opening doesn't have to be a perfect circle as more than likely an oversized fairing block and the trim ring will go over it and hide a less than perfect circle. To make the heat shield I rolled up aluminum foil and put that into sides of the cutout.

Hole saws of the size described here and are very expensive compared to a blade for the jig or sawsall, and would require a fairly powerful drill and could cause other complications. I cut my opening with a sawsall with a long course toothed flexable blade, a jig saw would work just as well. The installation came out absolutely beautiful and made winter living onboard possible. I understand your anxiety, measure where the opening needs to go multiple times, then measure again. I installed the heater before installing the flu and then ran the interior flu to site exactly were the opening in the cabin top had to be cut. Good luck
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Old 14-01-2014, 13:24   #30
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Re: chimney hole angst!

I agree with the jig saw method and used it myself recently. I had the same angst as the OP, and was laughing about it later. It really is easy.

I did use an abrasive edged saw blade and had no issue with chipping the gel coat or tear out damage.

The comment is correct about the cost of a hole saw that big, it's what deterred me originally. The expensive jig saw blade will get used more than the even more expensive rather large hole saw.
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