Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 22-02-2010, 10:37   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Miami, Florida
Boat: 1976 Hudson Force 50
Posts: 49
Chain Plate Repair / Replacement for a Force 50

My starboard aft chainplate has a crack in it at one of the 45 degree bends. My rigger recommended removing it and repaired. No doubt after seeing the crack it needed work.

After removing it last night, I saw that it had already been repaired on the inside of the plate at the stress/cracked location. This is one large\heavy chainplate with lots of stainless steel in it. It has three spots at the top for the rigging to attach to. It is approximately 2' long and probably weighs 40 lbs. It fastens to the outside of the hull.

Originally we were thinking that an extra plate would be welded on top of the original plate, once the crack was repaired, effectively doubling the thickness of the plate. When completed from about where the wood rail meets the plate down to atleast the first bolt hole would be doubled thickness.

Here is the question, I am doing all the R&R for each plate so would it be better to just have new one's made up or better to repair these and double the thickness as described?

Has anyone else replaced the aft set of chainplates yet? How much were they? Any thoughts or opinions from a welder or someone who has done this before?
__________________

__________________
yacht_planb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-02-2010, 10:56   #2
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 84
I was dis-masted a few years back by an inattentive bridge tender in Ft. Lauderdale. My standing rigging held up very well, but 3 chainplates snapped when the mast came down. Upon examination, all 3 were corroded from the inside out. There was no way to tell their condition short of having them x-rayed.

To make a long story short, I replaced all the chainplates, standing, and running rigging on my 1981 Hunter 30. As they say, "In for a penny, in for a pound". The guys at the boatyard made up the new chainplates in their machine shop and the cost was affordable. Bedding them properly was the hard part.

My vote is for replacing them, not beefing them up.
__________________

__________________
Alan Brown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-02-2010, 11:03   #3
Registered User
 
Stillraining's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Puget Sound
Boat: Irwin 41 CC Ketch
Posts: 2,876
I second that.
__________________
"Go simple, go large!".

Relationships are everything to me...everything else in life is just a tool to enhance them.
Stillraining is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-02-2010, 12:24   #4
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: between the devil and the deep blue sea
Boat: a sailing boat
Posts: 17,314
I replaced chainplates in our boat while the old ones still looked great. The boat was 25 y.o. then. Upon inspection, the old ch-plates were found to have some pitting on the undersides.

The price of new plates was way below my expectations - I think because the place we had them made had excellent tools and there was very little man-hours involved in machining (plates cut from a flat bar).

So, from my experience - replace, do not fix.

b.
__________________
barnakiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-02-2010, 13:06   #5
Registered User
 
swagman's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Winter land based UK New Forest. Summer months away. Making the transition from sail to power this year - scary stuff.
Boat: Super Van Craft 1320 Power Yacht
Posts: 2,175
Images: 10
Send a message via Skype™ to swagman
I'll be the fifth to suggest manufacture of new chainplates.
Go for it.
JOHN
__________________
Don't take life too seriously. No ones going to make it out alive......Go see our blog at http://www.sailblogs.com/member/yachtswagman/
swagman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-02-2010, 13:48   #6
Senior Cruiser
 
Sailmonkey's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Houston
Boat: '76 Allied Seawind II, 32'
Posts: 5,787
While our chainplates are small and simple compared to yours, I made ours in the garage for less than $100 in materials. Too me not to replace, even at twice the cost for one doesnt make sense when compared to the mast.
__________________
Sailmonkey is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 22-02-2010, 17:53   #7
Registered User
 
jrd22's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: San Juan Islands, WA
Boat: 1988 Brewer Three Seas 40' Pilothouse
Posts: 251
Definitely replace, do not repair.

We replaced all of our chainplates at 20 years of age. We made our own out of 316SS flat bar that we bought at Alaskan Copper and Brass in Seattle. Hopefully yours will be a standard thickness and width, ours had to be milled down from 2" wide to 1 3/4" which added expense. We had a machine shop drill all the holes exactly matching the old plates, if you have access to a good drill press you can do this yourself. Having everything polished to a mirror finish was more expensive than I expected, and it was difficult to find a place that would do it, but we finally found a shop in Auburn, WA that did a great job.
__________________
John Davidson
S/V Laurie Anne
1988 40' Brewer Pilothouse
jrd22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-02-2010, 20:07   #8
Do… or do not
 
s/v Jedi's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: in paradise
Boat: Sundeer 64
Posts: 9,198
When the new plates are finished, have them electro-polished. I am wondering why not electro-polish the bolts and nuts?

cheers,
Nick.
__________________
s/v Jedi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-02-2010, 10:40   #9
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Miami, Florida
Boat: 1976 Hudson Force 50
Posts: 49
Thanks for all the quick feedback. Anyone know a good metal fabrication shop in South Florida they would recommend?
__________________
yacht_planb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-02-2010, 15:31   #10
Do… or do not
 
s/v Jedi's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: in paradise
Boat: Sundeer 64
Posts: 9,198
Quote:
Originally Posted by yacht_planb View Post
Thanks for all the quick feedback. Anyone know a good metal fabrication shop in South Florida they would recommend?
I have used Metalworkx in Ft Lauderdale who delivered top quality. Ask for a quote.
They will not electro-polish automatically so ask or bring the plates elsewhere after manufacture for that.

cheers,
Nick.
__________________
s/v Jedi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2010, 08:57   #11
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 9
Chain Plates Replacement

I am looking at redoing the chain plates of a Spindrift 43. The chainplates are all encapsulated in fiber glass, so replacing them will be a major job. One alternative is to leave the existing plates as backing plates, and add new plates outside of the hull. Even that is not simple, as the extensive teak rails will need to be notched out etc. Has anyone done something like this? Any idea what it might cost?

Ben
__________________
bh100014 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2010, 10:02   #12
cat herder, extreme blacksheep
 
zeehag's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: furycame alley , tropics, mexico for now
Boat: 1976 FORMOSA yankee clipper 41
Posts: 17,777
Images: 56
Send a message via Yahoo to zeehag Send a message via Skype™ to zeehag
yacht [planb--you have a taiwanese built boat ..>lol...like mine--the 2 aft doubles are cracked on my boast--there is no way i would consider having them welded as that is a weakspot crying out for problems---please have new ones made--is a lot easier and cheaper in the long run---the fasteners are also a factor---as yours truly is a taiwanese boat--then the ss is not as good as should be and requires replacement--if not---well....what can i say--this is a problem inherent in the taiwanese boats---i know is in mine--i have researched with leaky teaky yacht club, formerly formosa owners group in yahoo groups---there is a lot of info there...goood luck--please post what you have decided to do-----spindrifts have similar problems--also try the leaky teaky yacht club!!
zeehag is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2010, 08:56   #13
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 9
Thanks for the advice!
I would like to know typically what's the cost (labour & material) for changing the chain plates for such boats...any idea?

Ben
__________________
bh100014 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2010, 09:13   #14
cat herder, extreme blacksheep
 
zeehag's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: furycame alley , tropics, mexico for now
Boat: 1976 FORMOSA yankee clipper 41
Posts: 17,777
Images: 56
Send a message via Yahoo to zeehag Send a message via Skype™ to zeehag
depends on the fabricator you find--shop around and look for salvaged boats lol--used parts are always cheaper lol sometimes even just as good if the chainplates were changed out before the reason for the salvage happened---look in kemah tx--there are many of our kind there lol...see our site--the leaky teaky yacht club on yahoo groups and in facebook...someone has done it and knows--i am still pending....gooodluck and keep posted!!!! i found the forward ones off a wooden garden design 41---happens!!! only ones i need are the doubles for main backstays and mizzen shroud.....oops--also factor in the fasteners....forgot that part lol--they are probably rusty also...
zeehag is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2010, 17:36   #15
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Miami, Florida
Boat: 1976 Hudson Force 50
Posts: 49
Port Chainplate crack...

Well I took a long look at my four aft chain plates (My boat has 5 per side).. and finally came to the conclusion for the reason it cracked. As it turns out the chainplates do an abrupt 45 degree angle about 8 inches below the toe rail to clear the mahagony railing. On all the chainplates that were ok, there is a trianglular block of wood that sits between the chain plate and the hull. This keeps the chainplate from flexing. On the one chainplate that was cracked there was no block of wood. Apparently the PO didn't think it was important, and I never thought much about it until recently. ;-(

With the block missing, it allows the chain plate to flex back and forth (mind you that these chainplates are like 3/8" thick and abot 22" long.

Anyway the price for new chainplates like these to be made up are $1200. each. I will post some pic's later..
__________________

__________________
yacht_planb is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
chain plate

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help identifying chain plate bolts Bradley Deck hardware: Rigging, Sails & Hoisting 2 20-10-2008 09:21
chain plate placement ksmith Construction, Maintenance & Refit 3 24-04-2008 09:55
Anchor/Chain replacement Gulfislander Anchoring & Mooring 9 18-03-2008 11:35
chain plate question rleslie Construction, Maintenance & Refit 5 07-09-2005 17:36
Chain plate failure, dismasting in the Southern Ocean GrayGoose Construction, Maintenance & Refit 1 27-03-2005 08:19



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 18:32.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.