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Old 21-03-2015, 09:14   #46
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Re: Can a propane camp stove be safe on a boat?

I have a switch that turns on and off my tank but you could just as easy manually turn it off and leave the stove on til it goes our if your that worried about the lines.

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Old 21-03-2015, 13:40   #47
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Re: Can a propane camp stove be safe on a boat?

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Originally Posted by Reefmagnet View Post
No intention in hijacking this thread, but does anyone have any idea how long those green Coleman canisters will stand up for in a marine environment? I've got an adaptor and a couple of these cylinders stored as temporary supplies so I can run the main cylinders to empty (it's a PITA to swap between the BBQ and stove cylinders so these little Coleman jobbies seemed like a good idea). I have wondered what the shelf life of them would be in a reasonably protected gas locker with regard to corrosion of the tank and valves.

I've found those little green propane canisters in many dark ,wet and rusty areas, upon discovering problems in boat systems.
People forget them sometimes.
Their not meant to be in a Marine Environment.


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Old 21-03-2015, 13:44   #48
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Can a propane camp stove be safe on a boat?

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Originally Posted by Don C L View Post
So am I right to assume that most folks are not concerned so much with the stove itself as the canisters? I have seen those gimbaled little stoves and I am assuming those folks do not disconnect their canisters when not in use. I know nothing is 100%, and everyone has their own risk tolerances, but it sounds like a camp stove isn't necessarily more dangerous than a marine propane stove as long as the canister is removed when not in use and stored in a properly vented locker. Actually, since nothing on a camp stove is hidden or buried, and that the whole system can be checked easily at one time, could be a point in favor of it. (?)

With regards to safety.
Properly, secured stoves are no problem.
If your underway, don't use them.
They can slide off the counter, hit the floor and break.
Then, well, I do have a story about that experience.
But, I'm very embarrassed to admit it happened to me.
NEVER again!!!


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Old 21-03-2015, 16:17   #49
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Re: Can a propane camp stove be safe on a boat?

Has anyone mentioned that all these cheap camp stoves don't have flame safety cutoff devices built in? It is very dangerous to use a stove inside a boat that isn't fitted with these devices.
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Old 21-03-2015, 17:05   #50
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Re: Can a propane camp stove be safe on a boat?

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Lol. 99 percent of the grills you see hanging off the back if boats are propane and use a green canister. And 99 percent of all stoves run on propane and run thru the boat with gas tubing.

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Here is how I see a distinct difference:

Those grills hanging off the back of boats are just that: "Hanging off the back of boats." In other words, NOT inside the boat cabin.

Consequently, with the Magma BBQ on the outside rail of the boat, the possible leaks of gas from fittings or small green canisters that are attached are in open air (i.e. not in the interior of the cabin).

As I see it: Properly maintained and used, those grills used OUTSIDE of the boat cabin should not pose the same or as high a risk that a typical "camp stove" would pose if used INSIDE the boat cabin.

My personal view: I would be happy to use a Magma (brand used here to identify the type of grill designed for use on a boat) on the back deck (rail mounted) of a sailboat to cook outside, but I would NOT feel a typical camp stove (using the same type of small green gas cylinders) used inside would be as safe as the rail (outside) mounted Magma type grill. Yes, they use the same gas cylinders, but there are distinctly different places of use (even if both are on a boat).
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Old 21-03-2015, 17:37   #51
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Re: Can a propane camp stove be safe on a boat?

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Originally Posted by Boatyarddog View Post
With regards to safety.
Properly, secured stoves are no problem.
If your underway, don't use them.
They can slide off the counter, hit the floor and break.

Then, well, I do have a story about that experience.
But, I'm very embarrassed to admit it happened to me.
NEVER again!!!


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I think this raises a good point.

If one is using a typical small lightweight "camp stove" (e.g. Coleman brand two burner stove), the stove is probably NOT securely/permanently attached to the boat while in use. I imagine most boaters would use it as a "portable" stove (as it comes) and so it would simply be on the counter near the sink in a galley.

IF that is the case, one of the risks might be that IF the boat suddenly lurches (pitch or roll) such as are sometimes caused by larger than average waves (e.g. boat wakes) and the stove may move or fall off the counter (if not secured while being used).

IF the stoves falls while used, the connection of the gas source to the stove may break, and IF that happens, the gas could possibly be released quickly and could cause a immediate flare up that could spread (ignite other things) or possibly burn the cook in a jet of flame.

While this may seem like a rare or unlikely event, it is those "unlikely" events that make accidents what they are by definition.
Accident = an unfortunate incident that happens unexpectedly and unintentionally.

While looking at the highly regarded MAGMA BBQ grills for boats site, I noticed the marine BBQ grills have a warning saying "DO NOT" use the unit on a boat while on legs (the unit is intended to be securely mounted on a pedestal/rail mount while on a boat). To quote the site (they put the following in ALL CAPS and in bold red letters: "DO NOT USE LEGS ON BOAT!"

I suspect it is because the unit is considered "more safe" while securely mounted, and "less safe" if the unit is solely resting (by gravity) on legs on a boat surface (while used on the water, not on land).
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Old 23-03-2015, 15:03   #52
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Re: Can a propane camp stove be safe on a boat?

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Originally Posted by Reefmagnet View Post
Has anyone mentioned that all these cheap camp stoves don't have flame safety cutoff devices built in? It is very dangerous to use a stove inside a boat that isn't fitted with these devices.
Forgive my ignorance, what is the flame safety cutoff device? And I really don't want to flog a dead horse here, but what other safety devices do marine propane stoves/ovens themselves have that a camp stove does not have? By the way, I have no stock in Coleman, nor a death wish... just curious about all forms of fire makers on a boat! I've only had alcohol on my own boats, but the 6 boats I chartered years ago had propane systems exclusively. I never dissected the marine propane stoves to compare them to camp stoves.
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Old 23-03-2015, 15:09   #53
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Re: Can a propane camp stove be safe on a boat?

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Not to hijack this thread but I've thought about trying to make some kind of T in my propane line to my oven so that I can use the main propane system for the heater. Because I rarely use the heater I would need to be able to disconnect it. Is there a way to safely do that?
No. According to the ABYC, propane lines cannot have any connections inside the boat except at the appliance itself. You could make a "T" in the propane locker and run a separate propane line to the heater but you would want a shutoff valve and solenoid outside of the boat.

You shouldn't have to disconnect the heater, just turn it off and also turn off the solenoid.
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Old 23-03-2015, 15:14   #54
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Re: Can a propane camp stove be safe on a boat?

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Originally Posted by Reefmagnet View Post
Has anyone mentioned that all these cheap camp stoves don't have flame safety cutoff devices built in? It is very dangerous to use a stove inside a boat that isn't fitted with these devices.
That is an important point. While some folks might claim that they would shut off the gas if the flame went out, the truth is, they might get distracted and miss this.
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Old 23-03-2015, 15:20   #55
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Re: Can a propane camp stove be safe on a boat?

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Forgive my ignorance, what is the flame safety cutoff device? And I really don't want to flog a dead horse here, but what other safety devices do marine propane stoves/ovens themselves have that a camp stove does not have? .
The safety cutoff is a thermocouple that shuts off the gas to a burner if the flame goes out. It is installed near enough to the flame that when the burner is on, the heat from the burner heats the thermocouple which generates electricity to keep the gas valve open. Your gas water heater at home has the same safety feature.

The marine propane stove is fed from a tank mounted outside the boat with several safety features.

A camp stove is just that, a camp stove. Not a boat stove.

The folks at the various safety agencies have done a lot of studies on these appliances and analyzed accident reports. It would be unwise to ignore their requirements or recommendations. They are trying to save your butt.
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Old 23-03-2015, 15:52   #56
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Re: Can a propane camp stove be safe on a boat?

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The safety cutoff is a thermocouple that shuts off the gas to a burner if the flame goes out. It is installed near enough to the flame that when the burner is on, the heat from the burner heats the thermocouple which generates electricity to keep the gas valve open. Your gas water heater at home has the same safety feature.

The marine propane stove is fed from a tank mounted outside the boat with several safety features.

A camp stove is just that, a camp stove. Not a boat stove.

The folks at the various safety agencies have done a lot of studies on these appliances and analyzed accident reports. It would be unwise to ignore their requirements or recommendations. They are trying to save your butt.
How recent a device is this? AFAIK, none of my boats '85- 44ft, '86 -47 ft, '92- 42 ft had this. Ie: If you shut off the solenoid to let the flame burn out under a pot, and then forgot to turn the stove knob off. Next time you turned the solenoid back on for the next meal... gas poured out the burner unlit.
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Old 23-03-2015, 15:57   #57
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Re: Can a propane camp stove be safe on a boat?

Hi Ron, These same people also write so much legislation that they made many of us run off to sea to get away from all the PC.
Unfortunately, they have a way of coercing many people to believe that all their diatribe is actually critical when its not. Recall reading about having a person walking in front of the early motor car carrying a red flag as the vehicles were so dangerous? My wife never leaves the cooker unattended unless its flat calm and we also have sniffers in the bilges. There is nothing wrong with using a camp stove within the boat as long as a few sensible precautions are taken. Typically, you could place the stove inside your stainless steel sink. You can, pretty easily, make up a multiway gimbal. You could knock up a six sided folding steel box.....but at the end of the day its how you use anything on your boat that creates the danger or safety. Most of us keep cans of petrol on our boats - the next bit of legislation shall be that you must not, and then the insurance companies shall have another excuse not to pay out despite the actual causes.
That also means that if someone is using a camp stove they must be aware of the insurance implications. As has already been pointed out many a barbeque is plumbed into the main gas cylinder, sometimes with lengthy gas lines. These hoses can also fail and that is why solenoids are a good idea, but we really do not need to get overly paranoid. Use a camp stove by all means - just lets be careful about how.
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Old 23-03-2015, 16:01   #58
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Re: Can a propane camp stove be safe on a boat?

You dont need to hold the gas button down or in? If so, you have flame safety, or a thermocouple. Always carry a few thermocouples as spares - they are easy to fit.
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Old 23-03-2015, 16:51   #59
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Re: Can a propane camp stove be safe on a boat?

I have a fitted stove on my Centaur, but sometimes its easier to use portable BUTANE cylinder burners. Now..... I use it on top of the gimballed oven AND have then strapped to the cooker with jubilee clips. The hatch is open when cooking and so are vents. Ive done this on various boats for a lot of years.

I have guards for pans so nothing moves. I regularly check for heat under the burner and never leave it unattended. I only ever use it on the gimbal when the boat is underway and Ive run out of propane for the oven. There is no gas smell and the BUTANE bottles are self sealing when ejected from the connection to the burner. I usually carry 6-8 bottles of butane in the Gas locker in a box. Butane stinks if it leaks and Ive never ever smelled it.

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Old 23-03-2015, 17:19   #60
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Re: Can a propane camp stove be safe on a boat?

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How recent a device is this? AFAIK, none of my boats '85- 44ft, '86 -47 ft, '92- 42 ft had this. Ie: If you shut off the solenoid to let the flame burn out under a pot, and then forgot to turn the stove knob off. Next time you turned the solenoid back on for the next meal... gas poured out the burner unlit.
I don't know how long they've been around for, but you may have had cheaper RV stoves fitted. These are the same as marine stoves in many cases, but lack the safety cut off feature.
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