Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 09-02-2011, 15:56   #31
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Coastal VA
Posts: 130
For making hard spots at through-bolts and "crushable" hardware attachment areas, I like to use a "high-density fiber-filled bog" to create what would then be a fiber-filled cast-in-place hard spot. Drill bolt holes last...

This is made from epoxy (resin/hardener mix) with 1/4" milled glass fibers mixed in till its "full" (fibers standing up from surface of mix), then mix in enough silica (Cab-o-Sil or generic) to make a relatively non-sagging bog. Wood flour can be substituted for the silica, but donít use any micro-balloons or quartz spheres as these will lower the density of the mix.

This stuff will get hot in thick applications so use slow hardener...
__________________

__________________
Whimsy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2011, 17:10   #32
Mooderator
 
capngeo's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Key West & Sarasota
Boat: Cal 28 "Happy Days"
Posts: 4,211
Images: 12
Send a message via Yahoo to capngeo Send a message via Skype™ to capngeo
I use a Twin-Saw
__________________

__________________
Any fool with a big enough checkbook can BUY a boat; it takes a SPECIAL type of fool to build his own! -Capngeo
capngeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2011, 17:43   #33
Senior Cruiser
 
Minggat's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Hawaii, South Pacific bound
Boat: Islander 36
Posts: 1,221
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWatchman View Post

Router bits will last about 2-4 feet.
I use the carbide tipped router bits in my Rotozip.Difficult to find. I did find some at Sears. Knowing they exist is one thing. Finding them can make you crazy. But I agree, the easy to find bits are "consumables".

No bit is any good if allowed to get hot. Instant trash.
__________________
Minggat
Minggat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2011, 17:43   #34
Registered User
 
TheWatchman's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Channel Islands, CA
Boat: Spencer 53 Ketch
Posts: 42
Images: 2
Sorry Sail Monkey, had to work!

I wear a fresh air hood system 3M, Tyvek chem suit, Nitrile gloves and definatley ear protection.

On a budget, minimum: dust mask, Tyvek dust suit, ear plugs, eye protection.

You use a sawzall and you are gonna make a mess, not neat work, but suit yourself. You can purchase a Mag 77 used for about $50.
__________________
TheWatchman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2011, 17:47   #35
Senior Cruiser
 
Minggat's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Hawaii, South Pacific bound
Boat: Islander 36
Posts: 1,221
Quote:
Originally Posted by capngeo View Post

I use a Twin-Saw
Com'on, Share more.

The commercials I've seen for those things are great. Is the product just as great?
__________________
Minggat
Minggat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2011, 17:52   #36
Mooderator
 
capngeo's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Key West & Sarasota
Boat: Cal 28 "Happy Days"
Posts: 4,211
Images: 12
Send a message via Yahoo to capngeo Send a message via Skype™ to capngeo
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minggat View Post
Com'on, Share more.

The commercials I've seen for those things are great. Is the product just as great?
Yes.... Imagine using a circular saw blade on a grinder to make a plunge cut... scary huh? Now imagine the same set-up with ZERO kickback or "feed walking". Cuts like a laser beam. Depth control can be a pain, but a shoe could be made easily. I have one that I use a LOT. Cuts metal, wood, plastic, and yes, fiberglass. The cut is smooth edged and easy to control.

Oh and did I tell you I like it?

Here's a video.... (Not mine)
__________________
Any fool with a big enough checkbook can BUY a boat; it takes a SPECIAL type of fool to build his own! -Capngeo
capngeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2011, 18:03   #37
Senior Cruiser
 
Minggat's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Hawaii, South Pacific bound
Boat: Islander 36
Posts: 1,221
Quote:
Originally Posted by capngeo View Post
Yes....
Oh and did I tell you I like it?
Thanks for that. I'm going to be looking for one.

I get a lot of miles out of my Rotozip. The right angle adapter is of course not as good as a.. right angle grinder. But when you're trying to cut down how much you haul around it's worth considering.


I also have a Harbor Freight Fien knockoff that I have not tried yet. If it's any good for cutting, the fact that it cuts down on dust would be a HUGE plus.

I keep my Stinger vac hose as close to the work as possible. Really helps, but less dust would be much better.
__________________
Minggat
Minggat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2011, 18:09   #38
Mooderator
 
capngeo's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Key West & Sarasota
Boat: Cal 28 "Happy Days"
Posts: 4,211
Images: 12
Send a message via Yahoo to capngeo Send a message via Skype™ to capngeo
FWIW, in my experience HF tools suck (excepting the big cast iron shop tools). I know Craftsman is probably made in the same Chinese factory right alongside HF, BUT you can't beat Sears' dedication to spare parts availability. So far, I'd rate the Craftsman Twin-Saw an 8 out of 10 with only the lack of an adjustable depth shoe knocking it out of a "10"
__________________
Any fool with a big enough checkbook can BUY a boat; it takes a SPECIAL type of fool to build his own! -Capngeo
capngeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2011, 18:28   #39
Senior Cruiser
 
Minggat's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Hawaii, South Pacific bound
Boat: Islander 36
Posts: 1,221
Quote:
Originally Posted by capngeo View Post

FWIW, in my experience HF tools suck...
Yes, there is an obvious difference in quality. It's the HUGE price diff that makes "suck" seem a touch strong. It's easy to get spoiled by the quality of the good stuff. But if you don't make a living off of your tools (as in using everyday), then you have to justify the price diff. That is why Harbor Freight does so well. If you find that you need a more robust tool, the learning curve wasn't too expensive.

I bought some stepped drill bits at Costco. Costco is already a good deal. Saw a set with more in it later at FH for le$$. Took my Costco set back and saved a few bucks getting more. Couldn't be happier.

If you aren't familiar with stepped bits, just know that I don't have to carry so many drill bits anymore. They really shine when it comes to makeing a small hole in metal bigger. No grabbing.

Sorry fo rthe thread drift.
Attached Images
 
__________________
Minggat
Minggat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2011, 06:03   #40
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Coastal VA
Posts: 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by capngeo View Post
...HF tools suck...you can't beat Sears' dedication to spare parts availability...

That twin looks like a great tool! Are the blades carbide? Standard (cheap) or dedicated? How long will they hold up cutting glass?

I've bought maybe a half dozen HF power tools (mostly to save my "better" tools from the abuse of hired semi-skilled helpers) and many more HF hand tools and other items over the years. All in all, they are a very good value for the money spent, and their quality seems to be steadily improving over time.

As for parts availability, I used a 10 gallon, 14 amp (110V) compressor (as a spare to my mobile unit, which in turn is a spare to my shop unit) to power an air tool and totally ran it far past the listed duty cycle without allowing it to cool (needing to complete essential-but-stubborn task as paid help was $tanding idle waiting to get on with the job...). The compressor did the job like a champ, but about a week later, overused again by a worker, the regulator unit smoked and quit.

I called HF, and they told me it was months out of warranty. I said no prob, it was my fault anyway. I just want the part, how much? They said don’t worry about paying, it'll ship today and you should get it in a few days. Worked out well, and that little unit stands ready as a spare, for further abuse.
__________________
Whimsy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2011, 06:17   #41
Senior Cruiser
 
Minggat's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Hawaii, South Pacific bound
Boat: Islander 36
Posts: 1,221
One thing I noticed in the Twin Blade video is the dust is thrown in 2 directions. That can be a big negative to me in cutting fibergass, inside of boat a cabin. Seems that's where I've done most of my FRP cutting.

Getting a shop vac to be in the right place to suck up dust off of a runing machine would be of limited effectiveness.
__________________
Minggat
Minggat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2011, 13:26   #42
Senior Cruiser
 
Sailmonkey's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Houston
Boat: '76 Allied Seawind II, 32'
Posts: 5,781
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWatchman View Post
I wear a fresh air hood system 3M, Tyvek chem suit, Nitrile gloves and definatley ear protection.

On a budget, minimum: dust mask, Tyvek dust suit, ear plugs, eye protection.

.
That's why I've always hated this type of job....I've used the suit, mask (good one, not dust) goggles, but the lack of hood has meant I've still got glass dust on my face and eyes!! Unfortunatly I can't afford the hood for my amatuer hobby work
__________________
Sailmonkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2011, 14:19   #43
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Coastal VA
Posts: 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailmonkey View Post
That's why I've always hated this type of job....I've used the suit, mask (good one, not dust) goggles, but the lack of hood has meant I've still got glass dust on my face and eyes!! Unfortunatly I can't afford the hood for my amatuer hobby work
On the topic of affordable full face air-supply masks, and costs:

In summer, 1991, I was doing extensive repair to a Pearson 39 center cockpit, up on stands in a marina yard, that had been damaged in FL in hurricane Hugo and bought for salvage value from insurance company. About 30' of the starboard side had rubbed up and down against a concrete pier for more than a day in that storm and the hull/deck joint and maybe as much as 9" inboard of both hull and deck was damaged extensively.

Was using my 4x4 Toyota truck, with a camper cap on it as a tool shed, was living on a boat in a slip, and had put a piece of plywood on top of the camper cap to use the truck as mobile scaffolding while repairing the side of the boat.

It was summer, maybe in the upper 90s with very high humidity during the day, and I had to cut and grind out an amount of glass from that boat that took 80# of epoxy, glass and core material to replace. All scarphs were 15:1. A hot itchy job.

I had scrounged a 20'+ vacuum cleaner hose somewhere, and had a white plastic hardhat. A piece of Plexiglas maybe 7" wide x 4" tall was attached to hang close under the bill of the hardhat with maybe 3 loops of wire, through some drilled holes to make a clear face shield.

An old yellow raincoat was cut to make a hood that was then taped with duct tape all around the hat and clear face shield to make a hood that came down over the shoulders.

A 1.25" or 1.5" PVC plumbing elbow, a "street ell" (threaded on one side, female slip fitting on the other) was attached through a hole in the top of the hardhat and fastened with a nut (a cut piece of another PVC fitting) inside the hat. The elbow faced aft on the top of the hat, and a close nipple was glued into the female end of the ell, to which was then clamped the end of the 20" vac hose.

A rope was tied with a clove hitch around the hose in the correct place so that when the rope was tied around the waist, the hose came down off the back of the hat and was supported nicely at waist level from pulling backwards on the hat.

The long end of the hose was attached to the blowing side of a smallish shop vac of maybe 6 gallons that had been well-cleaned for the purpose.

So when the wearing a Tyvek suit, and the hooded air-supply facemask/hardhat, the vac, on the ground, would blow air up the hose, down over my face and head, and also some of the air would blow down through the neck of the suit and semi-inflate it, thus providing welcome ventilation in the heat, and also positive air flow out the cuffs at wrists and ankles so no dust could enter.

But wait! That's not all! Each morning I would drive up to the store and buy a 50# bag of crushed ice and put half in the vac and leave half in the cooler. So, the resulting flow of ice-cooled air through the hose, hat and suit made it possible to be comfortably cool and clean while doing one of the nastiest jobs ever - grinding lots of glass, for days, in sweltering heat and high humidity.

When the air would start warming up, the ice was melted, it was lunch time. The the other half of the ice went into the vac for the afternoon session.

For the rest of that summer, I was called Captain Nemo at that marina.
__________________
Whimsy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2011, 14:22   #44
Registered User
 
Fishman_Tx's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Beeville, Tx.
Boat: 1969 Morgan 40 Cruising Ketch "Lady Catherine II", 1973 Bristol 34 - "Our Baby"(RIP), Catalina 22
Posts: 876
Images: 12


Amazon.com: Makita 5090DW 9.6-Volt 3-3/8-Inch Cordless Circular Saw Kit: Home Improvement

And there it is...3-3/8 cordless circular Makita. Works like a dream and a Harbor Freight "Fein" knock-off for the tight spots and detail work. The "Fein" also can use scrapers for taking core off the lower skin without trashing it. JMHO.
__________________
Fish
"Behind every great man there is a woman, rolling her eyes."
But not for long! Now she's gone!
and peace and tranquility reign forever!
1969 Morgan 40 Cruising Ketch
Fishman_Tx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2011, 15:02   #45
Senior Cruiser
 
Sailmonkey's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Houston
Boat: '76 Allied Seawind II, 32'
Posts: 5,781
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whimsy View Post
On the topic of affordable full face air-supply masks, and costs:


For the rest of that summer, I was called Captain Nemo at that marina.
I love it, If I ever had more than a cockpit sole to do I'd be all over this!!
__________________

__________________
Sailmonkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
fiberglass

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cutting My Fiberglass Fuel Tank zds Construction, Maintenance & Refit 7 07-02-2011 14:25
Joining Hull-to-Deck Joint Permanently with Fiberglass Redbeard33 Construction, Maintenance & Refit 7 10-09-2010 18:39
Fiberglass Hull with Wood Deck? PreppieNerd Monohull Sailboats 12 05-10-2009 13:27
Cutting a hole in my deck hatch Waterborn Monohull Sailboats 15 26-04-2009 21:11
teak oil on fiberglass deck turkish6 Construction, Maintenance & Refit 0 26-08-2008 00:00



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 13:56.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.