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Old 22-11-2005, 19:48   #16
Kai Nui
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A thrifty suggestion. Find a commercial body shop as close as possible to a yard. These shops usually have at least a 60' booth. Use the yard crane to unstep your mast, (usually about $120 an hour)(VERY IMPORTANT). Photograph all of the fittings, and label them. Then remove them. Have the spars trucked to the truck shop, and supply the paint you want used. The length of your spars should not be too expensive to truck within 50 miles. My guess would be about $2000 to prep and paint the spars professionally plus materials, and if the shop can obtain the materials you want directly, you can probably get a long term warranty. My guess would be about a week, and under $5000. This includes new hardware to bed the fittings. PM me if you want a list of truck shops in a specific area. A good conversation with the shop's estimater should get you a solid price, and most shops will negotiate, especially if you catch them during a slow period.
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Old 01-02-2006, 20:22   #17
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I had my mast pulled this winter for a detailed rig survey. Among other work the rigger has recommended is re-painting the mast (~51') and boom (~12.5') (after other repairs). This includes stripping and bead blasting to remove corrosion from mutliple areas, which in turn facilitates further inspection of these parts. Then primer and paint. The discounted quote for just this is $3,500.

So I guess my options are (1) pay them to paint it this winter, or (2) try to paint it myself next winter, after I've delivered the boat north and got it home.

Advantages of (1): (a) Professional paint job done in a controlled environment, (b) all corroded areas cleaned up and inspected, (c) repairs (fresh welds, etc...) covered and protected from corrosion, (d) saves time and hassle, e.g. I don't have to deal with toxic chemicals myself.

Disadvantages of (1): spend $$$$

Advantages of (2): (a) save $$$$, (b) pride in a job well done (assuming it comes out OK without too much hassle).

Disadvantages of (2): (a) corroded areas not cleaned up and inspected before delivery voyage, (b) repairs not covered and protected from corrosion before delivery voyage, (c) uncertainty about my amatuer results (not having Awlgripped aluminum before), (d) have to deal with toxic chemicals, and (e) I've got plenty of other projects to fill my time.

What do you think you would do?

FWIW, the major repair involves putting in a doubler sleeve from below deck up to the halyard exit blocks (which I think are above the boom gooseneck), to repair a large crack at the vang attachment point just above the partners. I'm definitely going to have the rigger's spar shop repair the mast -- that's not in question, just whether to have them paint it now, or me try to DIY later...

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Old 01-02-2006, 20:30   #18
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In your position, considering you will already have the masts unstepped, and they wil have to strip whatever coating is on the section you are repairing, I would pay the $3500. THat is not a bad price considering the cost of materials. That's my opinion.
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Old 01-02-2006, 21:20   #19
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Hey Catamount

Save yourself from a further headache. And just spend the $3,500.

At least it'll get bead blasted. Inspected. If something wrong. Fix it. And paint it to specs. You can't go wrong at that price.

I say go with it man!!
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Old 01-02-2006, 22:17   #20
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Painting

I am in the middle of building a spinnaker pole for the small boat.
Decided that the pole should be painted for no particularly good reason. The aluminium ( aluminum ) tube was easy to sand and the primer paint stuck very well. I know the green marine paint sticks to the primer from painting other pieces. So I am usually a do it yourself kind of operation with these things.
$3500- is more than I paid for this small boat. Yikes.
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Old 01-02-2006, 22:37   #21
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Damn Micheal!!

How much did you pay for that boat?
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Old 02-02-2006, 06:52   #22
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I followed along with the question of why did "they" start awlgripping spars. The answer I received from a few reps that were in the business at that time was it was strictly for marketing and specifically for the boat shows. Brand X would have it's boats with aluminum mast in slip #1, and Brand Y (Sabre for one) would have it's boats with shiny while masts right next door. The tactic was successful. Those that have to renew the awlgrip in 15 years pay the price. There was no initial cost savings between the two options.

Larry
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Old 02-02-2006, 07:29   #23
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So I guess a third option would be to have the riggers go ahead and strip and bead blast the mast, but skip the primer and paint, leaving it as bare aluminum (at least in parts). Paint could be applied at some point in the future if desired.
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Old 02-02-2006, 08:38   #24
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Boat cost

$2750- US 1975 Tanzer 22 in good condition, new standing rigging wyres and turnbuckles, main, storm jib, 100% jib, 140% jib, all older, cruising spinnaker near new. Also 6hp Evinrude.
To get it to Canada cost 19% exchange and $411- in taxes, plus my own shipping costs. Total about $3685.50- I have built a new rudder and purchased a used 170% headsail, $200-, and ordered a new spinnaker that will cost $1098.75. Will need about $400- for deck hardware, and $300- to seal and paint the bottom.
This is what I would suggest for anyone that wanted to start sailing. If they do not like it they can sell the boat. There is a class association with info on anything anybody could want to know. I race PHRF and have broken a couple of class rules.
My rudder is not approved, my 175 headsail is mylar and I do not have four 6 foot long cushions inside. Easy fixes if I want to fleet race.
There is a T22 on ebay with a buy it now price of $1750-. It needs a rudder and motor. Not sure what sails are included.
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Old 02-02-2006, 15:45   #25
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Tim - I get varying opinions on aluminum without anodizing. Some say aluminum will create the protective barrier anyway - some say they would not have an untreated spar. I guess you could try it, watch it, and see if there is deterioration. one season will not make the difference. I still assume the labor is more in the handling, removal and reinstallation of hardware. Once the stick is prepped - paint part is quick, so you really want to be right the first time. You mentioned areas of corrosion. Is this dissimilar metals and fasteners ?

Larry
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Old 02-02-2006, 17:58   #26
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Myths!!!

Paint is not always paint. What paint can withstand the erosion on the leading edge of an airplane wing at 550 kts. Awlgrip. That is their claim to fame. Other paints try to match it but fall short. It is very durable and were it not for corrosion that has occured on your mast, the original Awlgrip would still be intact.
While we are dispelling myths, Awlgrip application is not rocket science. You will not need an advanced degree from a high tech university to apply it. You only need to be able to read and follow simple instructions.
To do the job you will need a couple of foam rollers, a high quality brush (badger hair), time, effort and paint. I believe you can do the entire job for around $700 for all materials. You don't have to spray it. If you do decide to spray it, you will need an airless sprayer (HPLV) but you can do just as well or better with a roller and brush. I have a copy of the Awlgrip specifications, procedures and practices that you will need should you choose to do it yourself. PM me and I will email them to you.
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Old 02-02-2006, 18:38   #27
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Very true, paint comes in a wide variety of qualities, and costs. Applying it with a foam brush will work fine, and will last fine. As for an untreated aluminum spar, I would not hesitate to go that route. The most important thing is to make sure you have perfect bedding on all fittings, and the doubler is sealed completely. Any area that would allow sea water to get trapped will corrode very quickly. As I mentioned in an earlier post, I have seen a number of bare aluminum spars on older neglected boats that showed no sign of deterioration. Of course, the real issue is will you be happy with bare aluminum? The cost and effort to unstep a mast makes it well worth the minor additional cost to paint them now. If you are going to have them bead blasted, the majority of the cost will be in this prep, and the cost savings will be minimal.
As for DIYS, if you have the tools, if you have the space, if you have the weather, and if you have the time, yes, you can do it yourself, and no it is not rocket science, but I can very rarely put all of those if's together, so I would seriously consider paying the $3500.
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Old 03-02-2006, 12:17   #28
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I would like to thank everyone for their comments and advice.

My wife has pointed out to me that she's the one who does all the painting around our house.

Not that I couldn't do this job! But I don't have the mast sitting at home right now -- it's 450 miles away! And there are good reasons for getting the painting done now rather than waiting until I do have the mast at home.

As discussed in another thread, I've decided to go with the "complete package" in the Rigger's proposal, which includes full prep and painting of both mast and boom with Awlgrip.

Thanks again,
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Old 03-02-2006, 14:33   #29
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Black anodized spar

I would like to jump in here with a question about my black anodized mast, boom and rub rails.

Structurlaly they all look fine to my eyes, but they definately look their age, (26 yrs)

Is there any thoughts about what process might bring back a bit of shine?

I had heard once that there is a 3m protectant product that when wiped on will give nice results, and last a year or 2. That would be very manageable if true.

Any help from the collective would be appreciated, and let me know if this should be reposted in a different thread.

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