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Old 05-08-2009, 14:06   #16
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It's abrasion resistance is said to be very high. What is the price comparison? I did one once but cant remember. (had a customer who needed closer spacing on his rails for charter use) UV is a concern. If you replace it every 3 years which is better? Add in the Jerry rigged appearance vs the wire and make your decision I guess.
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Old 05-08-2009, 14:40   #17
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We have had our 1/4 inch amsteel lifelines for almost a year now. All four have simple double eyesplices on the ends. THe forward ends are shackled, the rear are lightened with 1/8 inch lashings.
I did one first, and then based on that, I ended up putting shrinkwrap tubing, the non-adhesive kind, over each splice, and about four inches where each passes through the stantions. I got this in a grey color, and so far it still looks great. There is some very slight fraying on some sections, nothing that would degrade the strength. I have hopes that they will last 4-5 years?

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Old 05-08-2009, 14:50   #18
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Can Amsteel be cut with a knife?? Or any sharp object?? If yes, then I'd be real reluctant to use as a lifeline...but maybe that's just me....
Actually that is an advantage of Amsteel over wire. In an MOB situation you can quickly clear the lifelines, making it easier to bring the MOB over the rail at any part of the boat.

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Old 05-08-2009, 16:58   #19
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Hard to beat

5mm Dynex Dux and the small eyes from Colligo make a very nice life line set up. Easy to DIY. With 5mm Dux you get 10,500 lbs. breaking strength. Line Terminator End Fittings | Colligo Synthetic Systems | Colligo Marine

It is not easy to cut, not by a long shot. The base material, Dynex is used for butchers gloves....:-)
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Old 05-08-2009, 17:09   #20
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Why would you need to go to Dynex Dux over Amsteel for this application? Seems like an overkill and more expensive.

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Old 05-08-2009, 19:42   #21
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One of the differences in the Dux vs Amsteel Blue is that every fiber of the Dux is coated to prevent UV as compared to just the finished line for Amsteel. This goes a long way to preventing all but the very surface layer of the line from being damaged by UV.
It is also the only line that is certified by Lloyds.
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Old 05-08-2009, 20:12   #22
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However, the preference would be to cut the lashings, if used.

Chris


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Actually that is an advantage of Amsteel over wire. In an MOB situation you can quickly clear the lifelines, making it easier to bring the MOB over the rail at any part of the boat.

Paul L
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Old 06-08-2009, 10:27   #23
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However, the preference would be to cut the lashings, if used.

Chris
Yep, although under the heat of the moment who knows.

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Old 06-08-2009, 10:30   #24
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One of the differences in the Dux vs Amsteel Blue is that every fiber of the Dux is coated to prevent UV as compared to just the finished line for Amsteel. This goes a long way to preventing all but the very surface layer of the line from being damaged by UV.
It is also the only line that is certified by Lloyds.
Hay, I like Dynex Dux. I use it for my inner stay. I just think that it is an overkill for this application. It is something like 3 times the cost of gray amsteel and the added strength or reduced stretch isn't needed in a lifeline application.

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Old 06-08-2009, 14:34   #25
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amsteel

I recently replaced my lifelines with amsteel that I purchased from a commercial fishing supply house in Washington state. I did the brummell splice on each end. I found that by leaving the tails for bury in the standing part long and then varying the amount that you bury you can adjust the total length. I was able to to make the lines any length I wanted to within a 1/4 inch. I used turnbuckles but getting the right length exactly was appealing .
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Old 07-08-2009, 08:36   #26
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I have new ¼” SS and really like them but have several friends that are happy with amsteel (my running backs are amsteel & I like it) based on a study done by the naval academy the strength of the lifeline material is probably not as important as the structure that supports them. A PDF is available here www.usna.edu/Users/naome/phmiller/Lifeline.ppt but bottom line the stanchions on the academy mockup started were failing at about 1000# well below the strength of the wire or line.
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Old 07-08-2009, 11:31   #27
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No, that is not a shock absorber.

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Originally Posted by GordMay View Post
Your home made webbing tethers won’t be just as functional as the one I pictured. The “self coiling” feature is actually a built-in shock absorber, now mandatory on all construction safety belts.
They will, however, be “fairly” functional, just as the old 3-strand nylon rope lanyards of bygone days were.

It is just for space.

Shock absorbers consist of webbing sewn in a specific manner that will rip and extend when a pre-determined stress level - typically about 800 pounds - is exceded. Remove the cover from one and you will see what I mean. Rock climbers invented the method.

Sailing tethers generally are static webbing and rely on jackline stretch.
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Old 07-08-2009, 11:35   #28
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New Sensation: how long have you had your Tanton? what color is it? Cutter? (former Tanton owner)
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Old 09-01-2012, 22:41   #29
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Re: Amsteel for Lifelines, and...

Replaced our old, rusty, vinyl covered lines last summer, feel much happier about them now - here's how we terminated the lines on Audrey - we chose to eliminate the gate as we hadn't used it in years - made for total of 4 splices on all lifelines - very happy with the result, comfort and security.
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Old 15-05-2012, 13:19   #30
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Re: Amsteel for Lifelines, and...

What is a lifeline supposed to be? It is primarily to have something to grab on the way forward (or aft); to keep you in the boat; and to HAVE SOMETHING TO HANG ON TO IF YOU ARE SWEPT OVERBOARD. Try hanging on to a stainless wire -- it would cut your fingers off.

Colored Amsteel grey/blue are advertised as having UV resistance. There is so much strength in the Amsteel and it is so exposed that I have no problem using it for lifelines and inspecting it regularly along with the other regular items that get inspected.

My opinion is that Amsteel both looks better and works better for a lifeline. No reason not to use a covered line, either.
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