Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 21-10-2008, 19:41   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 51
A Better Cable Tie ?

We've all been sliced by cable ties. Is there a better design out there than the old standard cable tie? One that is still easily adjustable, still easy to cut off the excess, one that still comes in a variety of sizes, but that won't leave a sharp edge to bite at you?
__________________

__________________
Michael Jones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-10-2008, 19:48   #2
Moderator Emeritus
 
David M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: research vessel
Posts: 10,150
Take a lighter to the sharp part...just for a second. It eliminates the sharp edge. Or trim off some of the excess but not all of it...that helps too. I dont think there is a perfect solution.
__________________

__________________
David

Life begins where land ends.
David M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-10-2008, 20:15   #3
Marine Service Provider
 
AnchorageGuy's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Wherever the boat is!
Boat: Marine Trader 34DC
Posts: 4,618
Yes there are and they are called safety ties and Anchor makes them. But try and find them anywhere, go figure. Use a pair of large fingernail clippers to cut the ties and be sure to cut them close and no sharp edges.
__________________
Chesapeake Bay, ICW Hampton Roads To Key West, The Gulf Coast, The Bahamas

The Trawler Beach House
Voyages Of Sea Trek
AnchorageGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-10-2008, 20:29   #4
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: North Carolina
Boat: 44 footer
Posts: 923
Zip Ties don't have to be painful.

Take a razor blade and act like you are going to cut the tail off perfectly flush to the locking square shaped end of the zip tie. Push against the plastic with the razor blade. Then grab the tail and bend it in the direction of the cut. (Or pull towards you whichever is more comfortable... I find pulling away to be easier.)

A stress riser is formed on the plastic by the razor blade. The tail is then sheared off flush leaving nothing exposed to cut you. Bonus... makes for a neater looking installation.

Ta-da...

Zach
__________________
Zach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-10-2008, 20:35   #5
Registered User
 
Viking Sailor's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: Fantasia 35 - s/v Feeling Good
Posts: 1,074
FYI, I was over at Home Depot a couple of days ago and they now stock all stainless steel cable ties.

__________________
Viking Sailor is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 21-10-2008, 20:48   #6
Registered User
 
Jesse's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Oro Bay Puget Sound
Boat: Irwin sloop
Posts: 374
How do they work? Jesse
__________________
Jesse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-10-2008, 21:47   #7
Senior Cruiser
 
delmarrey's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Now in Blaine, WA
Boat: Modified Choate 40
Posts: 10,702
Images: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Jones View Post
We've all been sliced by cable ties. Is there a better design out there than the old standard cable tie? One that is still easily adjustable, still easy to cut off the excess, one that still comes in a variety of sizes, but that won't leave a sharp edge to bite at you?
It's called "Assumption of Risk". Anytime one does any kind of work they have to be aware of dangerous situations present on the job. And necessity has always been the Mother of invention.

Even just walking down a city street one can get cut by objects sticking out of a wall or equipment.

In the old days , in some societies (I was told long ago), the hands were regarded as one of the most valuable parts of the body. They protected them from as much as possible, it was their lively hood in most cases. (Carpenters, weavers, blacksmiths, farmers and so on)

In my trade I donate a little blood each week just due to the high risk.
__________________
Faithful are the Wounds of a Friend, but the Kisses of the Enemy are Deceitful! ........
A nation of sheep breeds a government of wolves!

Unprepared boaters, end up as floatsum!.......
delmarrey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-10-2008, 22:35   #8
Registered User
 
NW Craig's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Bremerton, WA
Boat: it doesn't have a sail so it doesn't count!
Posts: 93
I have "cable gun" that cuts the cable flush so there is no sharp end sticking out. You can also adjust the tension depending what you putting the cable around (tubing vs something solid). Can't remember where I got it but will do some checking and let you know.

craig
__________________
NW Craig is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-10-2008, 01:46   #9
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Vancouver, Can.
Boat: Woods 40' catamaran
Posts: 277
Nail clippers work very nicely on the tails if you get them close enough.
__________________
Evan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-10-2008, 02:46   #10
Certifiable Refitter/Senior Wannbe
 
Wotname's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: South of 43 S, Australia
Boat: Van DeStat Super Dogger 31'
Posts: 7,330
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Jones View Post
We've all been sliced by cable ties. Is there a better design out there than the old standard cable tie? One that is still easily adjustable, still easy to cut off the excess, one that still comes in a variety of sizes, but that won't leave a sharp edge to bite at you?
I hate people who don't cut the cable ties ends properly. I get cut by them every week.

We use a lot of cable ties here, properly a couple of hundred per week and one of the first things I teach new staff is how to cut them flush leaving no sharps edges or points.

Most of the time I see them thinking "What's the big deal". After a couple weeks and many cuts and nicks later, I notice them cutting the ties correctly.

We use small high quality sharp flush side cutters and carefully hold the cutters against the tie end to ensure there is no tail left sticking out to catch the arm of the next guy who has to work on the equipment.

Often the location of the ties precludes the use of cable tie guns etc.
__________________
All men dream: but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangereous men, for they may act their dreams with open eyes, to make it possible. T.E. Lawrence
Wotname is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-10-2008, 02:47   #11
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,573
Images: 240
I’ve never found the cheaper* cable tie “guns” (tensioning & cutting tools) to be much improvement over the traditional pull (tension), twist & snip (simultaneously) method, using diagonal cutting pliers.

* Cheaper cable-tie tools can be had for $10 - $25, whilst newer, more expensive “ergonomic” manual guns cost around $200 and more.

When installing cable ties, do not over tighten the tie. Pulling the cable tie too tightly against the insulation of the cable can cause damage to the cable. Also, use a cable tie with appropriate width. Large, heavy cables should not be secured with narrow width ties.

When installing cable ties, be careful to cut the plastic tie as close as possible to the lock mechanism, so that the remaining material is square and flush with the lock. I apply a slight twisting motion as I cut the tie.
Cutting cable ties on an angle and leaving a small portion protruding results in the creation of a small plastic knife. Reaching into a bundle of wiring with cable ties improperly trimmed can result in having one's hand cut from the small plastic knives created.

If a cable tie has to be removed, it is best to cut the tie on the input side of the locking ratchet mechanism. This will allow the tie to be re-used. The portion of the cable tie in the locking mechanism can be pushed out, and the cable tie can be used again, albeit that it must be tightened to a smaller loop diameter.

Cable ties which will be installed so that they are exposed to sunlight and weather should be of high quality and made of plastic designed to tolerate UV exposure. The garden-variety white-translucent nylon cable tie does not hold up well if exposed to sunlight for long periods.

Other methods of bundling cable together securely and semi-permanently include cable lacing, binding knots such as the surgeon's knot or constrictor knot, Velcro type hook-and-loop strips, etc.

Although the judicious application of heat can soften the trimmed end of a nylon tie, easing the sharp edges, great care must be taken to not overheat the tie, or the cable it’s securing. I don’t generally recommend the practice.

Thomas & Betts Ty-Rap Cable Tie Installation Tools:
http://www.tnb-canada.com/en/catalog...20Tools_en.pdf

Panduit Cable Tie Installation Tools:
http://www.brownbear.ru/upload/1_120...9311%20GTS.pdf
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-10-2008, 02:52   #12
Certifiable Refitter/Senior Wannbe
 
Wotname's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: South of 43 S, Australia
Boat: Van DeStat Super Dogger 31'
Posts: 7,330
And what Gord said
__________________
All men dream: but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangereous men, for they may act their dreams with open eyes, to make it possible. T.E. Lawrence
Wotname is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-10-2008, 10:42   #13
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 51
Thanks all!

Based on everyone's response I will continue using cable ties but practice the fine art of snipping them properly. Thanks for all the ideas!
__________________
Michael Jones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-10-2008, 13:20   #14
Registered User
 
john540's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Paradise Cay
Boat: Hylas 47
Posts: 167
If you want them to last a long time, you can use the mil-spec type that have a metal locking tab instead of a plastic one. They are also made from better quality plastic. I prefer to use the waxed thread and tie a square knot in it. I think it's sold under the name, "Koroseal tape".
__________________
john540 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-10-2008, 13:38   #15
Marine Service Provider
 
AnchorageGuy's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Wherever the boat is!
Boat: Marine Trader 34DC
Posts: 4,618
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan View Post
Nail clippers work very nicely on the tails if you get them close enough.

I believe I said that.
__________________

__________________
Chesapeake Bay, ICW Hampton Roads To Key West, The Gulf Coast, The Bahamas

The Trawler Beach House
Voyages Of Sea Trek
AnchorageGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Teleflex 6400 Series Cable (10') for Atomic 4 Shifter Chief Engineer Commercial Posts 0 16-10-2011 17:43
Want To Buy: Icom 710 RT Connection Cable Alecadi Classifieds Archive 5 12-10-2011 19:06
Want To Buy: Raytheon Radar Cable HoboTrek Classifieds Archive 2 06-10-2011 21:43
Ship-to-Shore Power Cable Revelations Electrical: Batteries, Generators & Solar 16 28-08-2011 20:26
US Practice of Deposit with Boat Purchase ErikFinn Our Community 277 19-07-2011 16:45



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 11:03.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.