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Old 26-07-2005, 01:59   #1
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What spares should a cruising yacht carry?

Reading the thread on hand cranks for motors and no wishing to “drift” the thread I was wondering what spares should I carry for my diesel motor. Going back to the other thread the question arises does this mean that I should carry a spare starter motor and what other spares should I carry?

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Old 26-07-2005, 03:54   #2
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Engine spares

3 spare water pump">raw water pump impellers and one spare endplate for same, perhaps bearing as well depending upon engine. If the raw water pump is not integral with the engine manufactured carry a complete spare pump. Two spare fresh water impellers.

Spare injectors already set up by an injection shop for proper spray.

You may be able to get a "kit" from engine distributor with head gasket, various other gaskets, "O" rings, rings, bearings, etc. which a mechanic can use to rebuild your engine.

Case of fuel filters for first filter, several for engine vacuum sealed.
Many oil filters vacuum sealed. Consider switching to a parasynthetic (compatible with regular oil) oil for engine and transmission oil changes giving you a 3X longer time between changes and, therefore, you don't have to carry as much engine oil.

Set of engine mounts (note that Yanmar has different part #s for port vs. stbd mounts for torque reasons and the rubber stiffness is different).

Two spare sets of alternator belts and water pump belts.

If you add a large case alternator to charge your house batteries leaving the stock alternator merely to drive the engine electrics the belt it will last for more than a year and alternator bearings for the engine will last for around 5000 to 8000 hours perhaps, otherwise carry spare alternator. You can get spare bearings and brushes and diodes for large case alternators which you can rebuild yourself with a little knowhow AND if you carry this small kit you probably woun't have to use it!

If you use a "high voltage" start battery (like the Optima) and have low resistance cabling to the starter you should not need to replace the starter or its solenoid for 8000 hours or more!. Most starter failures are due to corrosion or abuse by cranking with a low voltage which may double or quadruple the wear and heating. Keep in mind that owners of diesel engines who keep care of them get years and thousands of trouble-free miles. Only yachties, in general, have troubles due to neglect and poor installations.

Check on line for others with your exact engine model number for specifically related spares required beyond the usual as mentioned above.

People with engines that have raw water heat exchangers for cooling the transmission oil should carry a spare heat exchanger.'

Don't forget the zincs if you have engine zincs Spart throttle and shift cables. Spare "bulk" fuel line long enough to replace all of your flexible fuel lines. Spare "bulk" water hose. Spare multiple hose clamps--hich quality....see Gord's recommendation.

Many people should consider carrying a spare pressure plate (there are other names) which absorb the shock of putting the transmittion in gear KNOW how to realign one, and have the necessare special devices to properly keep it concentric with the engine when reassemblig or else you will scatter the springs out of the new one in short order. Not all mechanics pay sufficient attention to this detail.

For long trips carry a spare exhause elbow if yours is the type that is where the raw water enters the exhaust system. If you spend the extra money on the high-tech silicone-type exhaust hose you can store it easily because it bends WAY better that the normal stiffies. They also take much higher temperatures before exhausting themselves.

I'm sure the others here will find what I"ve missed (I hope).

Regards,
Rick
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Old 26-07-2005, 08:16   #3
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That covers most of it Rick. Not sure I would have considered injectors. What is your reasoning for those??? I would consider if the injectors are damaged to replacement, you are going to need a few other major parts as well.
To add to the list
While on the subject of the injectors, either a spare or the means of fixing, the injector fuel rail and return rail. These are commonly prone to cracking. A few spare copper washers for the "banjo" fittings. If the engine requires glow plugs to start, then glow plugs should be carried.
Corrosion inhibitor for engine cooling and spare coupling hoses from exhanger to engine. A spare engine thermostat. Common to failure, seldom thought about.
An assortment of some brass hose tails and adaptors for water pump and it's plumbing.
Thread tape and some epoxy putty like Emerkit or Sellys Need It. Spare oil pressure sender. Temp senders are rugged and I wouldn't bother with that.
WD40 or the like and grease.
ENGINE MANUALS
TOOLS. firstly are fastenings metric or imperial. You will need tools to suit which. You will need,
Set of ring spanners,
Socket set including deep sockets AND sockets with hex drives, like Allen keys. Common to find bolts with these head types on engine heads etc now. You will never remove an engine head bolt with a standard Allen key.
Torgue wrench.
Feeler gauge.
Multigrips
Set of 6" 8" 12" adjustable spanner
Allen keys
Screw drivers. several ranges of Philips, Pozi and slotted.
A MAGNETIC EXTENSION for picking up a droped nut out of the bilge.
Battery Drill and bits with some spare common size bits.
Set of taps and dies.
Easyouts for removing a broken bolt
Means of cracking a frozen nut. Used to be a cold chisel but you can get some nifty devices called nut splitters now.
A range of Spare nuts and bolts and spring washers
HAMMER
A SST metric and imperial rule.

Arrr what the heck, you may as well just tow around a spare boat behind you
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Old 26-07-2005, 08:20   #4
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Oh nearly forgot.
Gasket sealant and locktight
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Old 26-07-2005, 08:48   #5
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Thanks , i think!!!

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Old 26-07-2005, 12:01   #6
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Dear Boredinthecity,

You may use all of those items if you will be away from civilization for the next 30 years, 25% if you are cruising the Caribbean for the next 10 years, perhaps ten percent if you are coastal cruising and only one or two of those items if you are day sailing from a local marina. I would carry most of those spares were I to cruise the world, but for most of us we only need a spare raw water impeller, a spare racor filter, a drive belt and the tools necessary to change them.
The greatest determination is where are you going to sail. Oh, did I mention sail. Well, there is an idea........sail. You could sail the boat and wouldn't need all those other things. Spare sails, some sail cloth for repairs, needles and a palm, spare halyard line, spare sheets, ss wire rope and clamps, a couple gallons of bottom paint and sun tan lotion. All else can be purchased wherever you land.
Jim
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Old 26-07-2005, 13:26   #7
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Jentine wispered in the wind

Quote:
The greatest determination is where are you going to sail. Oh, did I mention sail. Well, there is an idea........sail.
You dont mean, you can not mean that those white things are not bed sheets.

Note to self" now must buy bed sheets

What do you mean: 2 gallons of bottom paint, I know i have a big butt that thats getting a bit personal

Is the lotion for the sails or fiberglass

Note to self must change my reading material

Just joking Jim but while you on the subject of sail how much spare sail cloath. Before you ask i have 10 years to fill in but probably untill i scare the freckel out of my self. Queensland, Islands, Pacific and where ever my navagation mistakes take me.

Paul
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Old 26-07-2005, 15:27   #8
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I reckon the best list of spares was that carried by "Exposure" when she was for sale. cant find the link now, but her owner posts on these forums so may be able to pm hime for the data (remembering to clear out your message box beforehand cause its full again)
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Old 26-07-2005, 16:29   #9
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To answer Wheels question regarding the need for spare injectors which are previously set up for proper spray pattern; True, this is not to replace damaged ones (they shouldn't get damaged). After 4 or 5000 hours the tips are getting eroded and perhaps slightly clogged and the resulting poor spray pattern causes rough running and slightly poor starting.

The sailing "purists" claim that you can just sail your way out of trouble yet the facts are: No matter how much ANYONE sails they spend considerably more time near some form of land or in anchorages than out at sea. A functioning engine RADICALLY improves your chances of not going aground and INCREASES your independence from others (read this Lynn and Larry Pardey....who sometimes call and ask for tows in or out of areas from those who HAVE engines or outboard motors-independence?). In short, having a functioning engine is a SAFETY feature not to be snubbed anymore than having spare anchors and sails, etc. Sailors today just don't realize how dangerous it used to be EVEN without heavy coastal and entrance traffic.

If one carries a lot of fuel then there is the additional option of motoring quickly directly to windward from far out to sea to escape an impending storm given sufficient warning. Wouldn't you want the option given a choice?
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Old 26-07-2005, 19:26   #10
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No Spares on your boat

If you are going to want spares for everything on your boat while cruising you don't need to carry anything. Just buy a second boat and load it up and tow it.

Just kidding.

The spares you carry above the basic maintence and cosumables, like oil, filters, etc should be dependent on where you cruise or sail. If you are a coastal cruiser or even a Caribbean sailor you don't need one of everything. They have some very good sources (ie Budget Marine) that can get you major parts and minor parts.

We have been in the Caribbean for a year and a half and we have been able to get just about everything we need.

In Marina Bahia Redonda once a month there is a swap meet. Many of the cruisers who have been out for years are selling un-used spares. Or in the case of one boat they tossed out a RO membrance becasue it had gone bad in the orginal package.

Point of my rambling is that spares can be had and sometimes buying thing you think you just might need leads to a waste of money and an overloaded boat. If your paticular boat goes through clucht plates quickily, for example, than a spare may be worth the money. Otherwise buying one adds weight to your boat and ties up you money which could be used for rum!
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Old 26-07-2005, 19:41   #11
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Toolz & Manuals

Engine Shop Manuals & Parts Catalogue’s are an important part of your maintenance/repair inventory.
When it comes time to effect repairs, you may find the Shop Manual indispensable; or if you don’t have all the requisite skills, someone else in the anchorage may be able to help (especially with the assistance of a complete manual). This also applies to having the right tools.
Likewise, it’s much easier to accurately order the “right” parts if you can refer to the catalogue part number (and page). Remember, your parts may be coming 1000 miles by airplane. You cannot always just show him the old one, asking for another "just like it".
FWIW,
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Old 26-07-2005, 20:57   #12
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OK lets summerise all this.
First off guy's, Paul is down here in Australia. If no one know's where that is, it's a little Island just off our West coast of NZ. We hope to claim it as part of NZ one day, but that's another story
Firstly, were Paul and I sail, especially if away from our home lands, we are out in the middle of some mighty wild blue yonder, with sometimes several weeks before we will sight land again and that's if we DID do a good job navigating. So independance is of major importance to us. Even if we do sail close to our home shores, we both have some "interesting" coast lines to say the least. Those reading the bumfuzzle saga will have read about crossing bars. So engines are important to us. Spares at sea are very important to us.
Another aspect, especially for us Kiwi's. Our dollar is very low at times. So we often are paying 3 times what US sailors pay for things. For those circumnavigating on a showstring, being able to carry out ones own repairs and have the tools and spares onboard to do so, is of great importance. May I dredgte up Bumfuzzle again. The fuel return hose splits. It is a hose under no pressure. It shouldn't split. So it must be the wrong material. He should have the correct one on board.

OK, so there is a limit to what we can carry. The lists Rick and I have put up are ultimate cover everything lists. Possibly extreme in a lot of situations and not enough in others. That's what Paul is going to have to work out. And ones like paul don't need to go out and buy the whole kit'n'kaboodle first off, when much of his sailing is going to be perhaps coastal training and short island hopes. It's years of hunting and collecting that will grow that inventory.
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Old 27-07-2005, 04:36   #13
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Thanks Wheels that pretty much sums up the situation but can you help me some specific advice, I found that lanolin is real good grease near salt water.

Is it better to use the spray, a jar or should I make like a Kiwi and just take the sheep along for company

Paul
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Old 27-07-2005, 06:39   #14
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Well that depends on what your wife/partner looks like. Besides, it looks pretty weird rubbing a sheep up and down the rigging screw's.
I didn't know you could get a spray version. I use the grease product called lanocote, on rigging threads. Love the smell, it reminds me of the ole farm days as a kid, pressing down the wool in the press.
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Old 27-07-2005, 14:58   #15
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link to the company showing product range for lanoli products
http://www.nrrbs.com.au/lanoguard3000.htm



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