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Old 13-10-2013, 17:01   #1
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Water in Cylinders

Hi, I tried to start my yanmar today and after a few minutes that Icould not start it, the engine began to throw salt water through the air intake. Then I realized that my water separation filter was half empty. I closed the water intake, and open the decompression valves on my engine, but by then my battery was out. I understand that the water got into the engine due to my excessive starting, but ow should I get the remaining water out of the cylinders?
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Old 13-10-2013, 17:18   #2
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Re: Water in Cylinders

If their is water in cylinder I would remove glow plugs or injectors.. I am not a boat mechanic but that's what I would for cars. The Diesel engine has very high compression if u were able to crank the engine over till battery died.. I don't think u had water in cylinder
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Old 13-10-2013, 17:20   #3
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Yikes. Pull the exhaust discharge manifold. Suck out the water with wet dry vac. Pull the injectors suck the water out. Change the oil. Turn the engine with a hand crank. Spray mystery oil into the cylinders from the open injector ports. Hand crank some more. That's about all I can come up with. Good luck.
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Old 13-10-2013, 17:39   #4
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Re: Water in Cylinders

there is no water in the oil, it was sucked from the exhaust. My question is how to get the remaining water out of the cylindersor or if i should bleed it and try to start it as is.
If I remove the injectors and turn the engine over with the starter I should get the remaining water out, is this correct?
is there a better way to get rid of the water?
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Old 13-10-2013, 17:45   #5
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Re: Water in Cylinders

As Sabray said. Do it as quickly as possible. No doubt you flooded the engine with seawater because you cranked too much with the seawater intake valve open. It's happened to me too and luckily was able to start it the very next day after getting the water out of everywhere. Check your oil. If no water there then you may skip the oil change until after you fire it up again.

Get your battery up to fully charged before cranking anymore on the engine. Don't open your cooling water intake again until the engine fires. Don't run the engine without that valve open.
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Old 13-10-2013, 17:52   #6
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Don't crank it anymore without pulling the injectors. Your choice on which way you proceed. I would go the route I described. If you don't have any water in your oil I would be amazed. Change the oil. Lube the cylinder walks before cranking you can turn it over by hand with injectors pulled . That will force most if the water out. Suck it dry with a wet dry vac.
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Old 13-10-2013, 18:08   #7
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Re: Water in Cylinders

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As Sabray said. Do it as quickly as possible. No doubt you flooded the engine with seawater because you cranked too much with the seawater intake valve open. It's happened to me too and luckily was able to start it the very next day after getting the water out of everywhere. Check your oil. If no water there then you may skip the oil change until after you fire it up again.

Get your battery up to fully charged before cranking anymore on the engine. Don't open your cooling water intake again until the engine fires. Don't run the engine without that valve open.
please tell me how you got all the water out
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Old 13-10-2013, 18:09   #8
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Re: Water in Cylinders

Since you have decompression devices , spin it with a new battery . No need to pull injectors ,fuel coming in will act as a lubricant . You gotta figure out why it did not start and cure that . Spinning but not starting will many times fill cylinders with water as the exhaust pressure is not enough to blow water out . I have done it this way many , many times . Decompression devise will hold exhaust valves open allowing water to blow out but you must get it running . Only time that I pull injectors is when I have no decompression devise .
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Old 13-10-2013, 18:19   #9
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Re: Water in Cylinders

pistackle, that sounds too good to be true but was the answer I was hoping!
The reason that it would not start is an empty diesel tank! (ihave 2 tanks and the tank selector on the wrong one).
So if I got it right, I will spin it with the decompression open and spin it for a while and then close the decompression levers and try to start it, right?
another question, this happened today. would it be too bad if I can't get to the boat tomorrow and I wait till tuesday?? Is that too long?
thanks to all of you guys!
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Old 13-10-2013, 18:34   #10
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Re: Water in Cylinders

another q, assuming it runs, should I change the oil? even if it is not milky?
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Old 13-10-2013, 18:42   #11
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Re: Water in Cylinders

Don't start the engine until you get all the water out. Water does not compress and water in the cylinders can result in bent rods, sheared crankcase bolts and worse, if anything can be worse.

If a diesel doesn't start with a few cranks it is advisable to shut the raw water intake.
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Old 13-10-2013, 18:43   #12
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Re: Water in Cylinders

Do it ASAP. You can probably get by without changing the oil, but why? Changing oil is a good thing, so I'd do it.
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Old 13-10-2013, 18:49   #13
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Re: Water in Cylinders

On my hydrolift muffler, down at the bottom, I drilled a hole and inserted a 3/8" hose barb with epoxy. I attached a four foot length of clear vinyl tubing to it and attached a small valve at the other end, which I located lower than the muffler. If I have to run the engine more than thirty seconds to get it started, I simply open the valve and let the muffler pot drain into the bilge. Once the engine is up and running, I close the valve. The valves don't last long so I'm going to convert to a simple screw on cap to a nipple.

On my old Volvo engine, in heavy seas I got a "water hammer" that drove water up the exhaust hose. Now, I have installed a large ball valve on the exhaust hose. When things get dicey, I hang the ignition key on the valve handle. Have to open it before starting the engine.
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Old 13-10-2013, 19:49   #14
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Re: Water in Cylinders

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Originally Posted by Roy M View Post
On my hydrolift muffler, down at the bottom, I drilled a hole and inserted a 3/8" hose barb with epoxy. I attached a four foot length of clear vinyl tubing to it and attached a small valve at the other end, which I located lower than the muffler. If I have to run the engine more than thirty seconds to get it started, I simply open the valve and let the muffler pot drain into the bilge. Once the engine is up and running, I close the valve. The valves don't last long so I'm going to convert to a simple screw on cap to a nipple.

On my old Volvo engine, in heavy seas I got a "water hammer" that drove water up the exhaust hose. Now, I have installed a large ball valve on the exhaust hose. When things get dicey, I hang the ignition key on the valve handle. Have to open it before starting the engine.
That's a great idea...thanx for the tip.
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Old 13-10-2013, 21:16   #15
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Re: Water in Cylinders

As I have said several times on this forum, If you pull the injectors, make sure you put rags or an old towel over the open holes or you will have oily water all over the side of your engine room. Since you said that you were trying to start on an empty tank, you will need to bleed it before it will kick off. Even though you cant detect water in the oil, some will have surely leaked past the rings. Change the oil, run it for a little while, and then change it again. That is much cheaper than a rusted cam or some other important part. I actually doubt that you will need to pull the injectors. After you have the water out of the muffler/exhaust system, turn the engine over by hand with the decompression levers lifted, and then use the battery to turn it over. With the exhaust valves open, you wont bend rods or break things. Then bleed it and fire it up. Good Luck with it, and change the oil. ____Grant.
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